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Fun With Poetry!. Literal Language Everyday writing and talking that says exactly what you mean. The car is red. It is cold. I am hungry. See John run.

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Presentation on theme: "Fun With Poetry!. Literal Language Everyday writing and talking that says exactly what you mean. The car is red. It is cold. I am hungry. See John run."— Presentation transcript:

1 Fun With Poetry!

2 Literal Language Everyday writing and talking that says exactly what you mean. The car is red. It is cold. I am hungry. See John run.

3 Poetry Vocabulary  FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE: A form of language use in which writers and speakers mean something other than the literal meaning of their words.  Simile, Metaphor, Hyperbole, Personification

4 Simile: A comparison of 2 UNLIKE things using “like” or “as” The sun sat in the sky like a dandelion in a pool of water.

5 Metaphor: A comparison of 2 UNLIKE things without the words “like” or “as” The sun was a dandelion in a pool of water.

6 Simile or Metaphor? I eat cheese like a mouse. simile He was an angry tiger ready to pounce. Metaphor Her smile was as bright as the sun. Simile He went fishing and liked being out on the lake. Neither

7 Hyperbole: An exaggeration of the truth. He had the strength of 1000 men.

8 Personification: Giving HUMAN qualities to something that is NON-HUMAN The daisies danced in the wind. U6qjDghttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7BTH U6qjDg

9 Poetry Vocabulary Imagery: words that use any one of the 5 senses to paint a picture for the reader. Visual: twisted, tan, wrinkled Auditory: thunder cracked, rumble Smell: sweet, perfumed, putrid Taste: bitter, salty, sour Touch: smooth, rough, wet, sandy, slimy

10 Poetry Vocabulary Alliteration: repetition of the first sound of a word. The slimy snake slithered slowly one the ground.

11 Poetry Vocabulary Onomatopoeia: words that imitate a sound Bang, swoosh, crackle, oink, hissed.

12 Poetry Vocabulary Rhyme: Multiple words having the same sound. Internal Rhyme, End Rhyme, Rhyme Scheme Cat & Hat Dog & Log Jackie & Wacky

13 Internal Rhyme Rhyme that occurs within the line of poetry. the cat in the hat went to bed, as the girl found the pearl in the oyster.

14 End Rhyme Rhyme that occurs at the end of a line of poetry “it was many and many a year ago, In a kingdom by the sea That a maiden there lived whom you may know By the name of Annabel Lee;”

15 Rhyme Scheme: The pattern that the end Rhymes follow (we use different letters of the alphabet to label the different rhymes, but use the same letter to label all the rhymes that sound the same) “It was many and many a year ago, (a) In a kingdom by the sea (b) That a maiden there lived whom you may know (a) By the name of Annabel Lee;” (b)

16 The Cat & The Fiddle Hey diddle, Diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon; The little dog laughed To see such sport, And the dish ran away with the spoon. By Mother GooseMother Goose

17 Once By The Pacific- Robert Frost 1 The shattered water made a misty din. Great waves looked over others coming in, And thought of doing something to the shore That water never did to land before. 5 The clouds were low and hairy in the skies, Like locks blown forward in the gleam of eyes. You could not tell, and yet it looked as if The shore was lucky in being backed by cliff, The cliff in being backed by continent; 10 It looked as if a night of dark intent Was coming, and not only a night, an age. Someone had better be prepared for rage. There would be more than ocean-water broken Before God's last 'Put out the Light' was spoken.

18 Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

19 Meter: The length of a line of poetry measured by syllables (stressed and unstressed) The cat in the hat (5 syllables)

20 Types of Meter: Iambic: and unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable (foot) In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, For they in thee a thousand errors note; But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise, Who in despite of view is pleased to dote sonnet 141 shakespeare

21 Meter and Rhythm Combined Iambic Pentameter: a line the is written using only iambs and uses 5 feet per line. In faith, I do not love thee with mine eyes, For they in thee a thousand errors note; But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise, Who in despite of view is pleased to dote;

22 Meter and Rhythm Combined Iambic Tetrameter: a line the is written using only iambs and uses 4 feet per line. Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow.

23 Dreams Hold fast to dreams For if dreams die Life is a broken-winged bird That cannot fly. Hold fast to dreams For when dreams go Life is a barren field Frozen with snow. Langston Hughes

24 Television Fire and Ice Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice. From what I've tasted of desire I hold with those who favor fire. But if it had to perish twice, I think I know enough of hate To say that for destruction ice Is also great And would suffice. Robert Frost

25 One Inch Tall- Shel Silverstein If you were only one inch tall, you'd ride a worm to school. The teardrop of a crying ant would be your swimming pool. A crumb of cake would be a feast And last you seven days at least, A flea would be a frightening beast If you were one inch tall. If you were only one inch tall, you'd walk beneath the door, And it would take about a month to get down to the store. A bit of fluff would be your bed, You'd swing upon a spider's thread, And wear a thimble on your head If you were one inch tall. You'd surf across the kitchen sink upon a stick of gum. You couldn't hug your mama, you'd just have to hug her thumb. You'd run from people's feet in fright, To move a pen would take all night, (This poem took fourteen years to write-- 'Cause I'm just one inch tall).

26 Television The most important thing we've learned, So far as children are concerned, Is never, NEVER, NEVER let Them near your television set -- Or better still, just don't install The idiotic thing at all. In almost every house we've been, We've watched them gaping at the screen. They loll and slop and lounge about, And stare until their eyes pop out. (Last week in someone's place we saw A dozen eyeballs on the floor.) They sit and stare and stare and sit Until they're hypnotised by it, Until they're absolutely drunk With all that shocking ghastly junk. Oh yes, we know it keeps them still, They don't climb out the window sill, They never fight or kick or punch, They leave you free to cook the lunch And wash the dishes in the sink -- But did you ever stop to think, To wonder just exactly what This does to your beloved tot? IT ROTS THE SENSE IN THE HEAD! IT KILLS IMAGINATION DEAD! IT CLOGS AND CLUTTERS UP THE MIND! IT MAKES A CHILD SO DULL AND BLIND HE CAN NO LONGER UNDERSTAND A FANTASY, A FAIRYLAND! HIS BRAIN BECOMES AS SOFT AS CHEESE! HIS POWERS OF THINKING RUST AND FREEZE!

27 HE CANNOT THINK -- HE ONLY SEES! 'All right!' you'll cry. 'All right!' you'll say, 'But if we take the set away, What shall we do to entertain Our darling children? Please explain!' We'll answer this by asking you, 'What used the darling ones to do? 'How used they keep themselves contented Before this monster was invented?' Have you forgotten? Don't you know? We'll say it very loud and slow: THEY... USED... TO... READ! They'd READ and READ, AND READ and READ, and then proceed To READ some more. Great Scott! Gadzooks! One half their lives was reading books! The nursery shelves held books galore! Books cluttered up the nursery floor! And in the bedroom, by the bed, More books were waiting to be read! Such wondrous, fine, fantastic tales Of dragons, gypsies, queens, and whales And treasure isles, and distant shores Where smugglers rowed with muffled oars, And pirates wearing purple pants, And sailing ships and elephants, And cannibals crouching 'round the pot, Stirring away at something hot. (It smells so good, what can it be? Good gracious, it's Penelope.) The younger ones had Beatrix Potter With Mr. Tod, the dirty rotter, And Squirrel Nutkin, Pigling Bland, And Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle and-

28 Just How The Camel Got His Hump, And How the Monkey Lost His Rump, And Mr. Toad, and bless my soul, There's Mr. Rate and Mr. Mole- Oh, books, what books they used to know, Those children living long ago! So please, oh please, we beg, we pray, Go throw your TV set away, And in its place you can install A lovely bookshelf on the wall. Then fill the shelves with lots of books, Ignoring all the dirty looks, The screams and yells, the bites and kicks, And children hitting you with sticks- Fear not, because we promise you That, in about a week or two Of having nothing else to do, They'll now begin to feel the need Of having something to read. And once they start -- oh boy, oh boy! You watch the slowly growing joy That fills their hearts. They'll grow so keen They'll wonder what they'd ever seen In that ridiculous machine, That nauseating, foul, unclean, Repulsive television screen! And later, each and every kid Will love you more for what you did. Roald Dahl


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