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Introduction to English Literature Chankil Park.  Sir Patrick Spens  The King sits in Dunfermline town,  Drinking the blood-red wine;  "O where shall.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to English Literature Chankil Park.  Sir Patrick Spens  The King sits in Dunfermline town,  Drinking the blood-red wine;  "O where shall."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to English Literature Chankil Park

2  Sir Patrick Spens  The King sits in Dunfermline town,  Drinking the blood-red wine;  "O where shall I get a skeely(skilful) skipper  To sail this ship or mine?"   Then up and spake an eldern(elderly) knight,  Sat at the King's right knee:  "Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor  That ever sailed the sea."

3  The King has written a broad letter,  And sealed it with his hand,  And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens,  Was walking on the strand.   "To Noroway, to Noroway,  To Noroway o'er the foam;  The King's daughter of Noroway,  'Tis thou must fetch her home."

4  The first line that Sir Patrick read,  A loud laugh laughed he;  The next line that Sir Patrick read,  The tear blinded his ee.   "O who is this has done this deed,  Has told the King of me,  To send us out at this time of the year,  To sail upon the sea?

5  "Be it wind, be it wet, be it hail, be it sleet,  Our ship must sail the foam;  The king's daughter of Noroway,  'Tis we must fetch her home."   They hoisted their sails on Monenday morn,  With all the speed they may;  And they have landed in Noroway  Upon a Wodensday

6  They had not been a week, a week,  In Noroway but twae(two),  When that the lords of Noroway  Began aloud to say, -   "Ye Scottishmen spend all our King's gowd(go ld),  And all our Queenis fee."  "Ye lie, ye lie, ye liars loud!  So loud I hear ye lie

7  "For I brought as much of the white monie(m oney)  As gane(go) my men and me,  And a half-fou(full) of the good red gowd  Out o'er the sea with me.   "Make ready, make ready, my merry men all,  Our good ship sails the morn."  "Now, ever alack(alas), my master dear  I fear a deadly storm.

8  "I saw the new moon late yestreen(last night)  With the old moon in her arm;  And if we go to sea, master,  I fear we'll come to harm."   They had not sailed a league, a league,  A league but barely three,  When the lift grew dark, and the wind blew loud,  And gurly grew the sea. 

9  The ankers brake and the top-masts lap,  It was such a deadly storm;  And the waves came o'er the broken ship  Till all her sides were torn.   "O where will I get a good sailor  Will take my helm in hand,  Till I get up to the tall top-mast  To see if I can spy land?"

10  "O here am I, a sailor good,  Will take the helm in hand,  Till you go up to the tall top-mast,  But I fear you'll ne'er spy(espy, descry) land."   He had not gone a step, a step,  A step but barely ane(one),  When a bolt flew out of the good ship's side,  And the salt sea came in.

11  "Go fetch a web of the silken cloth,  Another of the twine,  And wap them into our good ship's side,  And let not the sea come in."   They fetched a web of the silken cloth,  Another of the twine,  And they wapp'd them into the good ship's si de,  But still the sea came in.

12  O loth(reluctant), both, were our good Scots l ords  To wet their cork-heel'd shoon,  But long ere all the play was play'd  They wet their hats aboon(above).   And many was the feather-bed  That fluttered on the foam;  And many was the good lord's son  That never more came home.

13  The ladies wrang(twisted) their fingers white,  The maidens tore their heair,  All for the sake of their true loves,  For them they'll see nae mair.   O lang(long), lang may the maidens sit  With their gold combs in their hair,  All waiting for their own dear loves,  For them they'll see nae(no) mair(more).

14  O forty miles of Aberdeen,  'Tis fifty fathoms deep;  And there lies good Sir Patrick Spens,  With the Scots lords at his feet.

15  "Oh where ha'e ye been, Lord Randall my son?  O where ha'e ye been, my handsome young man?"  "I ha'e been to the wild wood: mother, make my bed s oon,  For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."   "Where gat ye your dinner, Lord Randall my son?  Where gat ye your dinner, my handsome young man?"  "I dined wi' my true love; mother, make my bed soon,  For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."

16  "What gat ye to your dinner, Lord Randall my son?  What gat ye to your dinner, my handsome young man ?"  "I gat eels boiled in broo: mother, make my bed soon,  For I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."   "What became of your bloodhounds, Lord Randall my son?  What became of your bloodhounds, my handsome yo ung man?"  "O they swelled and they died: mother, make my bed soon,  for I'm weary wi' hunting, and fain wald lie down."

17  "O I fear ye are poisoned, Lord Randall my son!  O I fear ye are poisoned, my handsome young man! "  "O yes, I am poisoned: mother, make my bed soon,  For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wald lie down."

18  THERE lived a wife at Usher’s Well,  And a wealthy wife was she;  She had three stout and stalwart sons,  And sent them oer the sea.   They hadna been a week from her,  A week but barely ane,  Whan word came to the carline wife  That her three sons were gane.

19  They hadna been a week from her,  A week but barely three,  Whan word came to the carlin(an old) wife  That her sons she’d never see.   “I wish the wind may never cease,  Nor fashes(worries, bothers, annoys) in the  flood,  Till my three sons come hame to me,  In earthly flesh and blood.”

20  It fell about the Martinmass,  When nights are lang and mirk(dark).  The carlin wife’s three sons came hame,  And their hats were o the birk(birch).   It neither grew in syke nor ditch(small stream),  Nor yet in ony sheugh(ditch);  But at the gates o Paradise,  That birk grew fair eneugh.

21  “Blow up the fire, my maidens,  Bring water from the well;  For a’ my house shall feast this night,  Since my three sons are well.”   And she has made to them a bed,  She’s made it large and wide,  And she’s taen her mantle her about,  Sat down at the bed-side.

22  Up then crew the red, red cock,  And up and crew the gray;  The eldest to the youngest said,  “’Tis time we were away.”   The cock he hadna crawd but once,  And clappd his wings at a’,  When the youngest to the eldest said,  “Brother, we must awa(away).”

23  “The cock doth craw, the day doth daw(dawn),  The channerin(fretting) worm doth chide;  Gin(If) we be mist out o our place,  A sair(sore) pain we maun(must) bide(abide).   “Lie still, lie still but a little wee while,  Lie still but if we may;  Gin my mother should miss us when she wak es,  She’ll go mad ere it be day.”

24  “Faer ye weel, my mother dear!  Fareweel to barn and byre(cow house)!  And fare ye weel, the bonny lass  That kindles my mother’s fire!”


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