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Is the hearing aid always to blame when things get really noisy? Gitte Keidser 1, Elizabeth Convery 1, Jürgen Kiessling 2, and Ruth Bentler 3 1 National.

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Presentation on theme: "Is the hearing aid always to blame when things get really noisy? Gitte Keidser 1, Elizabeth Convery 1, Jürgen Kiessling 2, and Ruth Bentler 3 1 National."— Presentation transcript:

1 Is the hearing aid always to blame when things get really noisy? Gitte Keidser 1, Elizabeth Convery 1, Jürgen Kiessling 2, and Ruth Bentler 3 1 National Acoustic Laboratories (Australia) 2 University of Giessen (Germany) 3 University of Iowa (USA) ASA meeting May 2010, Sydney

2 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Background Of 56 randomly selected hearing aid users, 82% reported experiencing loudness discomfort in real life Mean: -4.9 dB re 65 Mean: dB re NALSSPL

3 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Is the hearing aid to blame or has our world become ‘uncomfortably’ noisy? Question

4 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Normally hearing mature adults Of 20 participants who passed the Telscreen hearing test, 85% reported experiencing loudness discomfort  11 F/9 M  60 years [50,67]

5 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Reportedly loud sounds Sound categoryHI (N = 46)NH (N = 17) People/groups (large gathering, crowds, screaming children) Entertainment (music, TV, movies) Transportation vehicles (traffic, engines) Tools/machines (road work, lawnmower) HF and/or sudden sounds (sirens, screeching birds) Wind noise Aircraft 50% 46% 30% 24% 26% 7% 29% 41% 29% 35% 12% -

6 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Some variation People/group (discussions with several people, specific voices)  Other negative aspects than loudness discomfort Sudden transient sounds (door slamming, rustling, cutlery)  Could be the hearing aid – try noise reduction that target transient non-speech sounds

7 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Reportedly loud sounds Sound categoryHI (N = 46)NH (N = 17) People/groups (large gathering, crowds, screaming children) Entertainment (music, TV, movies) Transportation vehicles (traffic, engines) Tools/machines (road work, lawnmower) HF and/or sudden sounds (sirens, screeching birds) Wind noise Aircraft 50% 46% 30% 24% 26% 7% 29% 41% 29% 35% 12% -

8 Loudness tests suggest that LDL > 90 dB SPL

9 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Clinical implications Don’t just reduce the output level  Too low output levels can distort speech  A narrow range of output levels likely unacceptable Understand the client’s complaints  Definition of loudness discomfort may be holistic  Reaction can depend on activity at the time of exposure, attitude toward the noise source, noise sensitivity, and controllability of the stressor (Berglund et al., 1996) Counsel/educate your client  Normal hearing listeners rate the same sounds too loud  Use VC, change program, turn HA off, use ear plugs

10 National Acoustic Laboratories, Sydney, Australia ASA 2010, Sydney Acknowledgement The study was partly funded by HörTech, Germany


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