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Week 3 AP Language. Bellringer: Sept 2/3 Consider… What techniques can we use to accurately situate a text in time and space? Answer the following: What.

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Presentation on theme: "Week 3 AP Language. Bellringer: Sept 2/3 Consider… What techniques can we use to accurately situate a text in time and space? Answer the following: What."— Presentation transcript:

1 Week 3 AP Language

2 Bellringer: Sept 2/3 Consider… What techniques can we use to accurately situate a text in time and space? Answer the following: What must a text’s creator consider and incorporate into a text to increase the likelihood of its being successful in achieving its purpose?

3 Rhetorical Triangle  logical appeals (logos) –  credibility (ethos) –  emotional appeal (pathos) -

4 Rhetorical Triangle  logical appeals (logos) - says he’ll build a bunch of new bridges, schools, roads, universities; example of man from the city trying to get government under their instruction/control; gives example of the collapsed school built using rotting bricks; if you don’t vote, you don’t matter  credibility (ethos) - mentions God; self identifies as a hick; wears nice clothes but rolling up his sleeves; speaks in vernacular; identifies as a fellow fooled person; saying the truth, not a prepared speech, indicates that these are his real feelings  emotional appeal (pathos) - talks about the kids a lot (“ignorant offspring,” “bigger schools,” “universities just like the rich kids,” school example he begins with); identifies with them as hicks, notes that no one helped a hick but a hick hisself; plans to visit his fellow hicks via roads and bridges he has helped to create

5 Rhetorical Triangle  logical appeals (logos) - told them what he was going to help build (schools, roads, bridges, universities), used the man from the city as an example (hypocrisy in taking from everyone else) and calls him a hog  credibility (ethos) - identifies with them; he too was fooled by politicians, he also identifies as a “hick”  emotional appeal (pathos) - describes the school falling down on the children, he’s going to be running on his own, he was a part of their environment--he was one who went to see rather than be seen

6 Rhetorical Triangle  logical appeals (logos) - politicians were stealing money from people, he will build train tracks and schools for the people  credibility (ethos) - introduces himself as a political outsider/common man; he has been tricked, just like them; not all dressed up “pinstripe pants”  emotional appeal (pathos) - school fell down, victims were “mangled”; if they don’t vote for him, they only have themselves to blame for their poverty; passionate about the topic

7 SOAPSTone  Speaker - the voice the author creates to address a particular audience  Occasion - whatever prompted the author to send out a message  Audience - the ones receiving the message  Purpose - why the author wanted to send out the message  Subject - what the speaker is talking about/discussing/addressing  Tone - the attitude of the speaker toward the subject/material

8 SOAPSTone  Speaker –  Occasion –  Audience –  Purpose –  Subject –  Tone –

9 SOAPSTone: All the King’s Men  Speaker - a self described “hick”; not really a politician, as he’s unlike the city politicians; thin middle aged male with dark hair, average in appearance; informed but perhaps not so educated; simple vocabulary, concise; genuine in saying what he needs to say  Occasion - running for governor after school disaster  Audience - increasing in size and allegiance; simpleminded; uneducated; dirty and sad; poor, working class, lacking funds; have to work hard for food, blue collar and redneck; wretched  Purpose - get them to vote for him and enrage them  Subject - the corruption of the government and the need to emend it  Tone - excited, vibrant, lively, passionate, truthful, angry, genuine

10 SOAPSTone: All the King’s Men ✤ Speaker - a self described “hick,” aggressive speaker, vivacious, man in his 40s, disgusted with the cities, born in Louisiana, casual in address, made a lot of promises, had the people’s interests in mind ✤ Occasion - Trying to inform people that he was going to run for governor in his own way; he wanted people to vote for him; fooled by the government and disagreed with it; the story of the schoolchildren prompted him to speak out; previous politicians might have made him want to change ✤ Audience - “hicks” of Louisiana, undecided voters, a class no one cared about, blue collar working class people, farmers, bayou boys, downtrodden people who were not welcomed by fancy society, parents of young children who were concerned about education as a means of upward mobility ✤ Purpose - he wanted people to vote for him; he wanted to make a change ✤ Subject - improvements he wants to make and running for governor ✤ Tone - angry, passionate, concerned, determined, aggravated, assertive, ecstatic

11 SOAPSTone - ✤ Speaker - a “hick,” an average person, someone who cares about the people’s needs, in touch with the people, one who knows what needs to be done, passionate, not your normal politician ✤ Occasion - running for office as governor, new construction/reform ✤ Audience - fellow “hicks” like him, poor people, ignorant, uneducated, powerless, taken advantage of by those city people, unsatisfied and in need of relief ✤ Purpose - he wants their vote, he wants to make a change, he was/is one of them, just with more education ✤ Subject - building new schools, building a university, building roads, building a bridge, the exploitation by politicians ✤ Tone - strong, powerful, intense, angry, purposeful, passionate

12 Lesson 21 Vocabulary - Review and Practice aggregate archipelagoboonbuffoonchi canerycontaminantcorrugat eddeleteriousdisputatiouse mendfettergiddy heterogeneity indomitable irresolute metaphorically panacea peruse prodigy rebuff resilient scapegoat spurious tractable vivacious

13 HOMEWORK 1.Create 13 original sentences using Lesson 21 vocabulary # The uniting subject to write those sentences about is “Civil Disobedience.” Example: Many have characterized Thoreau as a constant and indomitable force in American philosophy; indeed, his ideas clearly echo in the works of both Gandhi and Dr. King. 2. Bring “Civil Disobedience” to class. 3. SOAPSTone and examine for the rhetorical triangle the first paragraph of “Civil Disobedience.” Bring this completed work to class.

14 I HEARTILY ACCEPT the motto, — "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, — "That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.

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17 Bellringer: September 4/5 What techniques can we (the readers) use to accurately situate a text in time and space? Also… Grades Collect sentences Notebook check

18 I HEARTILY ACCEPT the motto, — "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe, — "That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure.

19 Rhetorical Triangle  logical appeals (logos) –  credibility (ethos) –  emotional appeal (pathos) –

20 SOAPSTone  Speaker - the voice the author creates to address a particular audience  Occasion - whatever prompted the author to send out a message  Audience - the ones receiving the message  Purpose - why the author wanted to send out the message  Subject - what the speaker is talking about/discussing/addressing  Tone - the attitude of the speaker toward the subject/material

21 SOAPSTone  Speaker –  Occasion –  Audience –  Purpose –  Subject –  Tone –

22 Parallel construction p LoC anaphora - repeat the beginning words antithesis - contrast in parallels antimetabole - identical (or nearly identical) phrasing reversed (Think ABBA aka chiasmus) zeugma - one part of speech (often a verb) “umbrellas” others epiphora - repeat the ending words

23 Antithesis – contrast in parallels Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice. Man proposes, God disposes. Love is an ideal thing, marriage a real thing. Speech is silver, but silence is gold. Patience is bitter, but it has a sweet fruit. Money is the root of all evils; poverty is the fruit of all goodness. You are easy on the eyes but hard on the heart.

24 Antithesis – contrast in parallels “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”

25 Create Your Own You have 10 minutes to create one example for each of the five forms of parallelism about one of the following topics: 1. Safe driving practices 2. Your current favorite song 3. This creature The olinguito is the smallest member of the raccoon family. It has thick, woolly fur that is denser and more colorful (orange or reddish brown) than its closest relatives, the olingos. Its head and body length is 14 inches long (355 mm), plus a tail inches in length ( mm), and it weighs 2 pounds (900 grams). Males and females are similar in size. The olinguito mainly eats fruit, but may also eat some insects and nectar. These solitary animals live in trees and are mostly nocturnal. It is an adept jumper that can leap from tree to tree in the forest canopy. Mothers raise a single baby at a time. The olinguito is found only in cloud forests of the northern Andes Mountains. Its range includes Ecuador and Colombia, at high elevations (5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level).

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27 People that drive need to practice because practice helps people drive. Click it or ticket! He knowingly led and we blindly followed. That creature stares at you and your soul. I lost my keys and my hope. The sky will fall, but love will remain. The stars will burn out, but love will remain. Beauty will fade, but love will remain.

28 Parallel construction p LoC …successive verbal constructions that correspond in grammatical structure, sound, meter, meaning, etc.  Words - an individual part of speech (noun, verb, adjective, adverb, preposition)  Phrases - several parts of speech (the aforementioned expanded)  Clauses - parts of speech that must include a subject and a verb (one step below a sentence)

29 Parallel construction p LoC Exercise 1 A penny saved is a penny earned. Exercise 3 Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.

30 Lesson 21 Vocabulary - Review and Practice aggregate archipelagoboonbuffoonchi canerycontaminantcorrugat eddeleteriousdisputatiouse mendfettergiddy heterogeneity indomitable irresolute metaphorically panacea peruse prodigy rebuff resilient scapegoat spurious tractable vivacious

31 HOMEWORK 1.Complete Lesson 21 vocab sentence completion worksheet. 2.Study for your Lesson 21 vocabulary quiz. 3.Read p in The Language of Composition and complete Exercise 1 and 3. We will have a quiz on this after the vocabulary quiz. 4.Bring your textbook and 50 Essays to the next class!

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