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‘It matters to me’: a participatory approach to promote good mental health practice Michele Raithby, Julia Terry, Dr. Fiona Murphy, Dr. Jayne Cutter.

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Presentation on theme: "‘It matters to me’: a participatory approach to promote good mental health practice Michele Raithby, Julia Terry, Dr. Fiona Murphy, Dr. Jayne Cutter."— Presentation transcript:

1 ‘It matters to me’: a participatory approach to promote good mental health practice Michele Raithby, Julia Terry, Dr. Fiona Murphy, Dr. Jayne Cutter

2 Overview 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Background to the study Engaging nursing and social work students and service users The World Café approach to learning Aims, methods & results Lessons for inter-professional reflective practice

3 Background 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Service user involvement in professional education programmes is essential to increase empathy and communication skills, and in terms of students’ practice and employability A World Café approach (Brown et al., 2005) was chosen as an interactive learning format in a café style setting, encouraging conversations that matter to those involved; promoting wider participation (McAndrew et al, 2011) The project was participatory from the outset, involving students, service users, carers and academic staff. The inter-professional context enabled participants to engage in conversations about mental health, to learn from each others’ attitudes and roles (Priest et al, 2008); and for students to reflect on their practice and engagement with service users Funded by the Higher Education Academy - £2294

4 World café steering group 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

5 Inviting students and service users to participate in steering group Steering group meets Students & service users discuss & plan content World Café event held Quantitative data collected 4 Focus groups held Qualitative data analysed Findings disseminated to wide audiences Next world café planned

6 Aims & objectives of the Inter-professional World Cafe 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Aim To explore whether a World Cafe is an effective learning strategy in raising awareness of interprofessional education in health and social care Objectives To identify whether nursing and social work students value interprofessional learning To identify whether joint attendance at a World Cafe event improves nursing and social work students’ understandings of each others’ roles To explore participants views of skill development and reflection for employability through inter-professional learning event To explore service users experiences of participating in a World Cafe event

7 A menu for learning 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

8 Icebreaker – What strengths and experience do I bring to the World Café? 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

9 Using a variety of learning and teaching styles 17th International Reflective Practice Conference The ‘Question Time’ panel: Mental health care in Wales requires more service user and carer involvement. How can this be achieved? Preparatory material prior to café 4 short videos during the event

10 Table discussions 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

11 Methods 17th International Reflective Practice Conference A 15 item questionnaire designed for this study, asked students to report perceptions of their learning regarding role awareness, and employability skills Focus groups then elicited participants’ reflections on their experiences of attending. Students (n=57) completed the questionnaire on the day, with 4 subsequent focus groups held (students n = 18; service users n = 10) Focus group transcripts were analysed thematically Ethical approval was obtained at the outset from the university research and ethics committee for this mixed methods study

12 Questionnaire 1= strongly agree, 2 = agree, 3 = neither agree nor disagree, 4 = disagree, 5 = strongly disagree 17th International Reflective Practice Conference My understanding of the role of service users in the planning and delivery of care has improved as a result of attending the World Cafe Inter-professional learning will have a positive impact on service users’ mental health care Interprofessional learning has improved my understanding of the unique perspectives of each profession Interprofessional learning will help me become a better mental health nurse/social worker Interprofessional learning will help me become a better team worker Interprofessional learning will help me to better understand service users’ problems It is not necessary for different professions to be taught together I would like to participate in interprofessional learning with other health and social care professionals

13 Results 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Findings indicate that students found the café to be a positive experience, with learning evident regarding transferable knowledge and skills for professional practice. Attending the World Café did not appreciably improve the students’ understanding of each others’ roles : 20/57 (35.1%) of students strongly agreeing/ agreeing that their understanding had increased 12/31 (38.7%) social work students 8/26 (30.1%) mental health nursing students However, inter-professional learning did increase the students’ understanding of the unique perspectives of each profession (30/57, 52.6% strongly agreed/agreed)

14 Results 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

15 Results – Focus groups 17th International Reflective Practice Conference 3 main themes identified: World café as a learning & teaching strategy Service user perspectives Inter-professional learning ‘We had some service users come in and talk to us…but I think this went to another level, the fact that we can sit there and interact with them and talk to them…it was unique in that sense” (social work student)

16 Service user perspectives 17th International Reflective Practice Conference “I think they realised that even though I’ve got grey hair, can’t hear, can’t walk, I’ve got experience, I’m not stupid, but I didn’t know it all either” (service user) “The service user on our table…that was the best part of the day, listening to him telling us about his experience and what helped him and what didn’t, and that was by far the best part” (student nurse) “Academic training is wonderful, but you’ve got to have the personal input as well, and everybody who trains has got to deal with people in the end” (service user) “(…) but I think when you're chatting face to face like that it’s sort of -- like when you're having your lectures and things and you're referring to them as service users, and then when you speak to them face to face it’s almost as though, oh, they're not a service user they're a person.” (social work student)

17 Learning about each other’s roles 17th International Reflective Practice Conference

18 Challenging myths 17th International Reflective Practice Conference “(…) I think some people were quite surprised as well when we were talking about our role and the fact that sometimes we do go out into the community and that we’re not purely ward based, and that we might work individually with people and do lone working as well. That seemed to come across as quite a surprise I think. I reiterate the same experience in terms of surprise that our role isn’t purely pharmacology, that we work holistically with people and look at different areas.” (student nurse) “I'm going to take away from it that I've survived four hours with social workers and there were no ill effects.” (student nurse) “I think a lot of tension and some clashes with multidisciplinary working once qualified are down to just a lack of knowledge and understanding of one another’s role. I think that if we can have inter- professional learning before we get to that stage, before we go and practice, then I think that perhaps we can all work a little bit more harmoniously then once we've qualified.” (student social worker)

19 Preparation for employment 17th International Reflective Practice Conference “It was quite nice to be in a position where you're almost chairing a multidisciplinary team. That’s something I'm going to take away from it (…) to sit there and practice your organisational skills.” (student nurse) “For me I guess kind of learning how to approach service users in the future in terms of seeing them as the experts really, that’s what I got mostly out of it more than once and that that skill I think can further develop me in my professional capacity.” (social work student)

20 Student learning 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Students were responsible both for their learning and professional conduct Students developed more knowledge of other professional roles – displayed both mutual appreciation and lack of understanding Students valued direct interaction with service users – different to routine service user teaching input on curriculum

21 Lessons for reflection from World Café 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Format can assist students’ critical reflection on power relations (Brookfield, 2009) Initiate dialogues inter- professionally and with service users Practical and personal engagement with service users (McKeown et al, 2010) – learn by doing Develop listening and hosting skills -apply to practice in future Reflection to inform future reflective practice (Fook & Gardener, 2007

22 Conclusions 17th International Reflective Practice Conference The project enabled students and service users to collaborate on an inter-professional learning event, adding to the knowledge base about this learning style Findings suggest lessons for further research into inter-professional educational initiatives involving students, and service users and carers, to promote good care practice in mental health and other areas Provided a template for replication – next World Cafés in College of Human & Health Sciences are in July and Nov 2013

23 References 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Bolton, G. (2010). Reflective Practice: Writing & Professional Development. (3 rd edition). London: Sage Brookfield, S. (2009). The concept of critical reflection: promises and contradictions. European Journal of Social Work, 12(3), Brown, J., Isaacs, D. & the World Café Community (2005). The World Café: shaping our future through conversations that matter. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Fook, J., & Gardner, F. (2007). Practising critical reflection : A resource handbook. Maidenhead: Open University Press. McAndrew, S., Warne, T., Fallon, D., Moran, P. (2011) Young, gifted and caring: a project narrative of young carers, their mental health, and getting them involved in education, research and practice. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing 21 (1), McKeown, M., Malihi-Shoja, L.& Downe, S. (2010). Service user and carer involvement in education for health and social care. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell Priest, H.M., Roberts, P., Dent, H., Blincoe, C., Lawton, D., Armstrong, C. (2008) Interprofessional education and working in mental health: in search of the evidence base. Journal of Nursing Management 16, 474–485

24 17th International Reflective Practice Conference Diolch yn fawr am wrando -Thank you for listening! Michele Raithby


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