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Unit 10 Text 1 郧阳师专英语系综合英语教研室. Guiding tips  Background Information  About the Author  Introduction of the Text  Comprehensive Questions  Language.

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Presentation on theme: "Unit 10 Text 1 郧阳师专英语系综合英语教研室. Guiding tips  Background Information  About the Author  Introduction of the Text  Comprehensive Questions  Language."— Presentation transcript:

1 Unit 10 Text 1 郧阳师专英语系综合英语教研室

2 Guiding tips  Background Information  About the Author  Introduction of the Text  Comprehensive Questions  Language Points  Discussion  Homework

3 Background Information(1) Education in Britain(1)  Education in the United Kingdom is compulsory for everyone between the ages of five to sixteen. This is the absolute minimum length of time that students attend educational establishments. Increasingly, children attend nursery schools at the age of three or four, and more Britons every year are staying in education after the age of sixteen. Educational institutions are expanding fast to meet the increased demands. There are two parallel school systems in the UK: the state system, where education is provided free; the independent system, where parents normally pay fees. About one in thirteen of British school-age children goes through the independent system. There are two parallel school systems in the UK: the state system, where education is provided free; the independent system, where parents normally pay fees. About one in thirteen of British school-age children goes through the independent system.

4 Education in Britain(2) Britain has a National Curriculum---a statement of the minimum learning requirement of all children at each stage in their education. This curriculum is compulsory in the state system. Independent schools are not bound by it, but in practice most of them teach what the National Curriculum demands. Britain has a National Curriculum---a statement of the minimum learning requirement of all children at each stage in their education. This curriculum is compulsory in the state system. Independent schools are not bound by it, but in practice most of them teach what the National Curriculum demands. About forty percent go on to Further Education colleges from the state or independent sectors. Students who choose to continue their education want to go to a university or university sector college to do a degree. A- level and AS-levels in GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education )are still the most common entrance qualifications for students in the UK. About forty percent go on to Further Education colleges from the state or independent sectors. Students who choose to continue their education want to go to a university or university sector college to do a degree. A- level and AS-levels in GCSE (General Certificate of Secondary Education )are still the most common entrance qualifications for students in the UK.

5 Background Information(2) About Geoffrey Chaucer (1340-1400)  English poet, one of the most important figures in English literature. His masterpiece, in which he achieved his fullest artistic power, is The Canterbury Tales. This unfinished poem, about 17, 000 lines, is one of the most brilliant works in all literature. The poem introduces a group pf pilgrims journeying from London to Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the stories represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life.

6 Background Information (3) phrases of “thumb”(1)  1.Under one’s thumb: under one’s control 在某人支配 ( 控制 ) 下  e.g. I can’t tell you what pain I feel when I see how much my mother is under my father’s thumb.  2.All thumbs (fingers) :clumsy, unable to hold it, fingers feel like thumbs 手脚不灵巧, 笨拙  E.g. When I try to sew a button on my shirt, I’m all thumbs.  3.Green thumb: good gardener, naturally good with plants 绿手 指, 指种植花木蔬菜的高超技能  e.g. Willie is the green thumb in our group. He is the gardener.

7 Phrases of “thumb”(2)  4.by thumb: to someone by stopping the driver to give you a lift 以免费搭车的方式  E.g. He traveled to other parts of the country by thumb  5.thumb down; reject, not accept 反对  E.g. He tends to thumb down all my best ideas.  6.thumb up: approve, be for sth. 赞成  E.g. The chairman thumbed up our plan.  7.twiddle one’s thumbs :to do nothing while you wait impatiently for sth. to happen 闲 着无事  E.g. For the next half hour I was twiddling my thumbs waiting for my friends to arrive.

8 Phrases of “thumb”(3)  8.thumb through :turn the pages of a book, magazine etc. without reading much of it 快速浏览 E.g. She thumbed through the guidebook, looking for somewhere to visit in the afternoon.  9.thumb one’s nose at :behave in a way that you do not care what they think 蔑视  E.g. He has always thumbed his nose at the media.  10.stick out like a sore thumb :very noticeable because they are unusual or inappropriate 显得十分不自然, 不合适  E.g. The ugly painting stuck out like a sore thumb in the art gallery.

9 About the Author  Edward Blishen(1920- ),British novelist, autobiographer, writer of children’ s fiction, and writer in the field of education. He has been working as an editor for the Junior Press Encyclopaedia, London, since 1961.The text is an extract from one of his publication Roaring Boys(1955).

10 Introduction of the Text(1) organization and development(1)  The text is a short and amusing story which vividly describes how a fledgling substitute teacher tries to keep a class of unruly boys under control. The story has an artistic outset---direct quotation of the headmaster’s instruction which relates to the title---the thumb, a pun of double meanings.  The body of the text is a detailed account of the interaction between the teacher and the students---the teacher, timid and incompetent, tries all his means to bring the class into order while the students, mischievous and arrogant, disregard all classroom disciplines.  The story ends with a climax of the conflict in which the young teacher takes up a book on Chaucer, which he intends to read to the class but is mistaken for the Bible---a proof of the giant boys as intellectual dwarfs.

11 Introduction of the Text writing features of the text  The text is a short narrative piece of writing which vividly and amusingly relates how a young inexperienced stand-in teacher attempts to control a class that has frightened away a succession of substitutes for their own teachers. The writer is particular successful in his effective use of comic exaggeration. The narrative is convincing due to the writer’s excellent description of a situation totally out of control, and vivid due to the writer’s keen observation of the behavior of a young and inexperienced teacher when his authority is threatened.  Many rhetorical devices are employed in this text: simile, metaphor, striking contrast, parallelism, etc.

12 Comprehensive Questions  1.Why do you think the writer felt pale when he saw the headmaster’s thumb?  (The headmaster’s thumb looked like a short and thick cudgel to the writer. He felt pale, perhaps because 1) he was astonished to be told that he had to keep the pupils under control by force; 1) he was astonished to be told that he had to keep the pupils under control by force; 2)compared with the headmaster’s huge thumb, his own thumb was quite small; so he felt embarrassed for being not so manly as the headmaster) 2)compared with the headmaster’s huge thumb, his own thumb was quite small; so he felt embarrassed for being not so manly as the headmaster)  2.Why did the writer regret apologizing to the boy in the hall?

13  (He regretted doing so because it was the boy, and not he himself, who was in the wrong. The boy was running in the hall, which was obviously against the rules and regulations of the school. He had bumped into the teacher and nearly knocked him over. Instead of scolding the boy, the writer apologized. This showed his lack of self-confidence and his fear of the boys.)  3.What does the writer mean by “one desk was chasing another”?  (The writer is trying to tell us that the boys were fighting, they were using their desks as weapons.)  4.Why did the writer say “The air was full of pieces of chalks, a strange rain of it”?

14  (Some other pupils used chalk as a weapon in their fight. The classroom smelt of chalk and pieces of chalk flew about in the air and dropped to the floor.)  5.why did the teacher fail to keep the class under his thumb in the history lesson?  (He failed to do so probably because of the following reasons: 1)He lacked self-confidence.He trembled on the way to the classroom. 1)He lacked self-confidence.He trembled on the way to the classroom. 2)He had little experience in teaching.He didn’t know how to keep discipline in the classroom. He felt angry as nobody seemed to take any notice of him. Then in order to show his authority as a teacher, he shouted at the whole class. Actually he should have spoken calmly and in a more appropriate manner. He felt totally at a loss what to do in front of the enormous, roaring boys. He blushed and yelled in turn, which made the class, even the studious-looking boy, look down on him. 2)He had little experience in teaching.He didn’t know how to keep discipline in the classroom. He felt angry as nobody seemed to take any notice of him. Then in order to show his authority as a teacher, he shouted at the whole class. Actually he should have spoken calmly and in a more appropriate manner. He felt totally at a loss what to do in front of the enormous, roaring boys. He blushed and yelled in turn, which made the class, even the studious-looking boy, look down on him.

15 3)He didn’t seem to know much about methodology or the way to conduct a class skillfully. He produced a book on Chaucer, a big and academic-looking book, with the intention of giving the boys a favorable opinion of him but the result proved just the opposite. 4)He was not patient enough as a teacher. He was too easily shocked, stung, hurt and frightened.)

16 Language Points  1.A succession of startled substitutes had stood before them, ducked, winced and fled.  a succession of: a number of persons or things following on one after another 一连串, 一系列,e.g.  A succession of unexpected visitors came to our department on the first day of school. Last summer there was a succession of uncomfortable hot days. Last summer there was a succession of uncomfortable hot days. The worst misfortune that befell her was to bear a succession of girls. The worst misfortune that befell her was to bear a succession of girls.

17  Paraphrase: a number of teachers, one after another, took the place of their own teacher, none of them remained calm in front of them. They draw back in fear, felt frightened, unable to deal with the situation, and finally left in a hurry.  2.It was plain the headmaster thought they had got nowhere.  It’s plain that :it’s obvious that e.g. It’s plain that he did not wish to continue. It’s plain that he did not wish to continue.

18  3.Indeed that was the worst of it--- that these improprieties couldn’t be nailed down. nail sth. down :literally means “fix something firmly “ and figuratively means “establish clearly and unmistakably”. E.g. nail sth. down :literally means “fix something firmly “ and figuratively means “establish clearly and unmistakably”. E.g. nail sth. down :define sth. precisely nail sth. down :define sth. precisely e.g. Hard figures are impossible to nail down. e.g. Hard figures are impossible to nail down. nail sb. down: make sb. say precisely what he believes or wants to do e.g. nail sb. down: make sb. say precisely what he believes or wants to do e.g. What does she want? I can never nail her down (to anything). What does she want? I can never nail her down (to anything).

19  4.I managed to make out that mixed up with these giants was a certain amounts of furniture.  Make out :to see or understand with difficulty e.g.  I can’t make out what she wants.  I can just make out the writing on the blackboard.  5.My voice trailed away :my voice became gradually fainter and stopped at last.  trail away/off: (of sb’s speech )gradually become quieter and then stop, esp. because of shyness, confusion etc.  E.g. Her voice trailed away in shyness.  His interest in the work soon trailed off.

20  6.I was toying inwardly with ideas of thunderbolts, earthquakes, mass execution.  toy with sth.1)consider sth. idly or without serious intent  E.g. I’ve been toying with the idea of moving abroad.  toy with sth.: 2)handle or move sth. carelessly or absent- mindedly  E.g. She was just toy with her food, as if she wasn’t really hungry.

21  6.I was shocked to the core.  To the core: right to the center; absolutely  E.g.The apple is rotten to the core.  Her refusal shocked us to the core.  He is honest to the core.

22 Discussion  Is it right for anybody to keep somebody under his thumb? Would you like to be kept under somebody’s thumb?  Supposing you were a teacher, what will you do to keep a group of unruly students under your thumb?

23 Homework  Review text 1.  Finish the exercises on workbook.


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