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1 Chapter 2: Product Development Process and Organization Introduction Importance of human resources: Most companies have similar technology resources.

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Presentation on theme: "1 Chapter 2: Product Development Process and Organization Introduction Importance of human resources: Most companies have similar technology resources."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Chapter 2: Product Development Process and Organization Introduction Importance of human resources: Most companies have similar technology resources. How to use these technology resources is up to creativity of people using them effectively.

2 2 2.1 Important Definitions Quality for both hardware and software is a measure of how well a product satisfies a customer at a reasonable price. Design quality is measured as how well the design meets all requirements of the customer and other groups that interact with the product. Software quality is when the final product performs all functions in the manner intended under all required conditions. Manufacturing quality is often measured as the percentage of products that meets all specified design and manufacturing requirements during a specified period of time.

3 3 2.2 Collaborative Product Development Product development in an environment where people of different disciplines can work together as a team. Product development in an environment where information can be exchanged synchronously (where team members meet together at a meeting, via audio or video, etc.) and asynchronously (where team members exchange information at different times thorough shared technical data bases, emals, etc.).

4 4 2.4 Concurrent Engineering (CE) Definition of CE: A systematic approach to the integrated, concurrent design of products and their related processes, including manufacture and support. This approach is intended to cause the developers, from the outset, to consider all elements of the product life cycle from conception through disposal, including quality, cost, schedule, and user requirements.

5 5 2.4 Concurrent Engineering (cont.) Objectives of CE –Reducing the time needed to develop a product through overlapping the different product development stages. –Reducing manufacturing costs through designing a product knowing manufacturing processes. –Producing a high quality product through knowing customer expectations and resources available.

6 6 2.4 Concurrent Engineering (cont.) Tools for CE –Flexible decision models (e.g. procedure guidelines including description of subject, responsible persons, input, output, and verification). See the example of the PowerPoint file: Ch 2 - Supplemental 1 - Product Development.ppt –Knowledge representation schemes and tools (e.g. shared data base, compatible CAD exchange format, etc.) –Tools that facilitate effective communications in both synchronous and asynchronous manners. –Quantitative and qualitative tools that measure the impact on all product parameters. See the demo files of DFMA (Design for Manufacture) and DFA (Design for Assembly) at the Boottroyd Dewhurst, Inc. web site:

7 7 2.5 Product Development Process Requirements Definition (Chap. 3) Conceptual Design (Chap. 3 and 4) Detailed Design (Chap. 5) Manufacturing (Chap. 7) Logistics, Supply chain, and Environment (Chap. 8) Test and Evaluation (Chap. 6) Fig. A2.1 Product Development Process

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9 9 2.6 Program Organization Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), MIL-STD-881: A hierarchical family tree that identifies and defines all task elements required for the program. See Table 2.1. Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT): A PERT is a network diagram with boxes connected by lines that shows the sequence of development activities and the interrelationship of each task with another. Often used in conjunction with a Gantt chart. See Fig. A2.2. Gantt Chart: A chart showing the progress of each activity against a time scale. See Fig. A2.3.

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11 11 An example of Network Diagram (PERT Chart) Source: Smartdraw.com Fig. A2.2 Example - Network Diagram

12 12 Source: Smartdraw.com An example of Gantt Chart Fig. A2.3 Example - Gantt Chart

13 Program Organization (cont.) Technical Controls: Technical documentation includes but are not limited to: –Specifications –Block and interface diagrams –Design guidelines –Drawings –Process capabilities –Purchased part information –Technical files

14 Program Organization (cont.) Design Reviews are a crucial communication link between the designer and specialists from all the applicable disciplines. The purpose of design reviews is to evaluate technical progress, identify potential problems, and to provide suggestions for design improvement.

15 Program Organization (cont.) Production Readiness and Design Release: Before a design is ready to release for production, several actions must be completed. –All analyses and verifications being completed: All engineering and business analyses, process capability studies, and vendor verification tests must be completed and corrective actions incorporated –Design being finalized: Final technical reviews of hardware and software must be completed and corrective actions incorporated in the design. –Manufacturing readiness: Manufacturing and service plans and procedures must be revised to reflect the latest design changes.

16 Technical Risk Management Don’t always think about eliminating all risks. For innovative products, it is sometimes necessary to take risks. The steps for Technical Risk Management 1.Systematically identify areas of potential technical risk. 2.Determine the level of risk for each area. 3.Identify and incorporate solutions that eliminate or reduce the risk. 4.Continue to monitor and measure progress on minimizing risks.


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