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Social 20-1 Related Issue 4: To What Extent Should Individuals and Groups in Canada Embrace a National Identity? Chapter 13: To what extent have visions.

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Presentation on theme: "Social 20-1 Related Issue 4: To What Extent Should Individuals and Groups in Canada Embrace a National Identity? Chapter 13: To what extent have visions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Social 20-1 Related Issue 4: To What Extent Should Individuals and Groups in Canada Embrace a National Identity? Chapter 13: To what extent have visions of Canadian identity evolved? Introduction : pp

2 Until 1965, Canada did not have its own official flag. In 1964, Prime Minister Lester Pearson suggested that Canada adopt a design.

3 What is responsible government? (A government that answered to the people rather than to British- appointed governors. Louis-Hippolyte Lafontaine and Robert Baldwin demanded responsible government.

4 Canada was created by the BNA Act (British North America Act) in The original provinces in Canada were Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. The two levels of government this act defined were: 1.The federal government was to look after national affairs, 2.and the four provincial governments would manage their own regional affairs. Canada’s first prime minister was John A. Macdonald.

5 Clifford Sifton was the Minister of the interior in charge of settlement of the Canadian west. He wanted only British and American immigrants to settle the Canadian west because he believed they would make the best homesteaders because they spoke English and understood the desired customs of the day.

6 Prime Minister John A. Macdonald’s national policy centered around the following: Peaceful settlement of the Canadian West A national railroad High protective tariff.

7 Exploring Nationalism: pp Read Canada's rich cultural heritage--- Meagan Kelly report: Ukrainian Village near Edmonton 9Bq-LdN7t4 (9:02) min. 9Bq-LdN7t4

8 Not many characters in Canadian history have aroused such depth and bitterness of feeling as that of the Métis leader, Louis Riel. The mere mention of his name bares those latent religious and racial animosities, which seem to lie so close to the surface of Canadian politics. Despite the fact that he identified himself, not with the French Canadians of Quebec, but with the mixed blood population of the western plains, Riel became, for a few years, the symbol of the national aspirations of French Canada. French speaking Canadians elevated him to the pedestal of martyrdom, and English- speaking Canadians damned him as a Rebel. In Riel, the people of Quebec professed to see a heroic patriot defending on the far away prairies the cause of Canadians living in the valley of the St. Lawrence: the people of Ontario saw in him the murderer of an Ontario Protestant. Source: The Canadian Historical Association, by G. F. G. Stanley Québec History 23 - Métis North-West Resistance ature=related : (8:41 min.) ature=related Québec History 24 - Canada Hanged Louis Riel feature=related (6:18 min.) feature=related


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