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Opener 1)What baroque characteristics are represented in the Hall of Mirrors? How does it show Louis XIV’s wealth and influence? 2)Messiah is an example.

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Presentation on theme: "Opener 1)What baroque characteristics are represented in the Hall of Mirrors? How does it show Louis XIV’s wealth and influence? 2)Messiah is an example."— Presentation transcript:

1 Opener 1)What baroque characteristics are represented in the Hall of Mirrors? How does it show Louis XIV’s wealth and influence? 2)Messiah is an example of what musical form? 3)Who professionalized dance in France? 4)What is tenebrism? 1)What baroque characteristics are represented in the Hall of Mirrors? How does it show Louis XIV’s wealth and influence? 2)Messiah is an example of what musical form? 3)Who professionalized dance in France? 4)What is tenebrism?

2 The Enlightenment A Reason for Reason

3 Louis XIV… Up until now, the nobility and monarchy enjoyed lavish, extravagant lifestyles and paid little attention to the needs of the middle and lower classes. –Economic problems in France –Monarchy is concerned with parties and military battles, not the people. Up until now, the nobility and monarchy enjoyed lavish, extravagant lifestyles and paid little attention to the needs of the middle and lower classes. –Economic problems in France –Monarchy is concerned with parties and military battles, not the people.

4 “Enlightened” Thought Mobilize the power of reason in order to reform society and advance knowledge. Looking at the nature’s mysteries through rational thought, rather than religion or superstition. Happiness should be achieved in this world, not the next. Reason is the instrument to happiness, taking over the position once held by religion. Mobilize the power of reason in order to reform society and advance knowledge. Looking at the nature’s mysteries through rational thought, rather than religion or superstition. Happiness should be achieved in this world, not the next. Reason is the instrument to happiness, taking over the position once held by religion.

5 French Salons & English Coffeehouses Coffeehouses would be a place for one to discuss political and social ideas in a polite setting.

6 French Salons & English Coffeehouses As you watch the clip, answer the following questions in your notes: 1) Why were coffeehouses called “penny universities”? 2) How did this help facilitate the sharing of political and philosophical ideas amongst the middle class? 3) What might be a modern day equivalent to this form of information sharing and discussion? Think technologically. As you watch the clip, answer the following questions in your notes: 1) Why were coffeehouses called “penny universities”? 2) How did this help facilitate the sharing of political and philosophical ideas amongst the middle class? 3) What might be a modern day equivalent to this form of information sharing and discussion? Think technologically.

7 John Locke The government’s purpose is to create order and protect man’s natural rights Man has innate rights - life, liberty and property Social Contract - People have a right to rebel if the gov’t doesn’t protect their natural rights. Wrote Two Treatises on Government The government’s purpose is to create order and protect man’s natural rights Man has innate rights - life, liberty and property Social Contract - People have a right to rebel if the gov’t doesn’t protect their natural rights. Wrote Two Treatises on Government

8 Thomas Hobbes Man is inherently selfish and out of control The government’s purpose is to ensure peace Social Contract - between citizens and leader in which citizens give up rights for peace and security. People never have the right to rebel Advocated absolutism (French monarchy) Wrote Leviathan Man is inherently selfish and out of control The government’s purpose is to ensure peace Social Contract - between citizens and leader in which citizens give up rights for peace and security. People never have the right to rebel Advocated absolutism (French monarchy) Wrote Leviathan

9 Jean-Jacques Rousseau Man is naturally good, but social institutions and religion corrupt. Will of the people rather than divine right. General will of society. Wrote Social Contract Man is naturally good, but social institutions and religion corrupt. Will of the people rather than divine right. General will of society. Wrote Social Contract

10 Charles de Montesquieu Advocated for Separation of Powers - separate executive, legislative and judicial branches to limit and control each other. (Checks and Balances) “When the legislature and executive are united in one man, there is no liberty.” Wrote The Spirit of the Laws (1748) Advocated for Separation of Powers - separate executive, legislative and judicial branches to limit and control each other. (Checks and Balances) “When the legislature and executive are united in one man, there is no liberty.” Wrote The Spirit of the Laws (1748)

11 American Revolution Ideas of the Enlightenment inspire the colonists: No Taxation without representation Tired of being a money- maker for Britain Locke’s Social Contract Did not want to be ruled by a government across the ocean. Ideas of the Enlightenment inspire the colonists: No Taxation without representation Tired of being a money- maker for Britain Locke’s Social Contract Did not want to be ruled by a government across the ocean.

12 In the mid to late 1700’s, France was a mess. France had had an absolute monarch, Louis XIV, who had reigned for 72 years. Though he brought culture to France, he also created great economic problems.

13 French Revolution Poor and middle class were paying all taxes. When Louis XVI comes to power, he tries to raise taxes on the rich, but they refuse to pay Economic problems = food shortages. Middle class wanted more control in their government. =wXsZbkt0yqo Poor and middle class were paying all taxes. When Louis XVI comes to power, he tries to raise taxes on the rich, but they refuse to pay Economic problems = food shortages. Middle class wanted more control in their government. =wXsZbkt0yqo

14 Get into groups 1.Drew, Alex, Breeley, Chris, Kira, Lindsay, Daniel 2. Maddie, Kayla, Kaylee, Cody, Malik 3. Courtney, Brandon, Blake, Jake, Chase M., Laron 4. Kellie, Hannah, Chase B, John J, John Paul, Wade 1.Drew, Alex, Breeley, Chris, Kira, Lindsay, Daniel 2. Maddie, Kayla, Kaylee, Cody, Malik 3. Courtney, Brandon, Blake, Jake, Chase M., Laron 4. Kellie, Hannah, Chase B, John J, John Paul, Wade

15 English Coffeehouse in the Classroom In groups of 4+, you will read a primary source from an Enlightenment thinker. You have 25 minutes Your job is to: Discuss the thinker’s major ideas. Create a poster illustrating: Name of philosopher Dates of life Main idea or philosophy (including one direct quote) How does this philosophy apply to our world today? Summarize what this philosophy is about. You will then present your ideas to the class. Only one person will speak, but ALL members must know the information! In groups of 4+, you will read a primary source from an Enlightenment thinker. You have 25 minutes Your job is to: Discuss the thinker’s major ideas. Create a poster illustrating: Name of philosopher Dates of life Main idea or philosophy (including one direct quote) How does this philosophy apply to our world today? Summarize what this philosophy is about. You will then present your ideas to the class. Only one person will speak, but ALL members must know the information!

16 Exit Slip 1) What if the Enlightenment thinkers could have used Twitter or Facebook? -- “Tweet” or make a status update about a philosophical or political idea you learned about in class as if you are one of the Enlightenment philosophers. Or 2) Create a bumper stick to persuade people to agree with the philosophical/political idea of one of the thinkers we learned about today. Remember, make it “catchy”! 1) What if the Enlightenment thinkers could have used Twitter or Facebook? -- “Tweet” or make a status update about a philosophical or political idea you learned about in class as if you are one of the Enlightenment philosophers. Or 2) Create a bumper stick to persuade people to agree with the philosophical/political idea of one of the thinkers we learned about today. Remember, make it “catchy”!


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