Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Juliann Greene Debra Yasutake Marta Yang.  Main Article: Billingsley, B.S. (2007). Recognizing and Supporting the Critical Roles of Teachers in Special.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Juliann Greene Debra Yasutake Marta Yang.  Main Article: Billingsley, B.S. (2007). Recognizing and Supporting the Critical Roles of Teachers in Special."— Presentation transcript:

1 Juliann Greene Debra Yasutake Marta Yang

2  Main Article: Billingsley, B.S. (2007). Recognizing and Supporting the Critical Roles of Teachers in Special Education Leadership. Exceptionality, 15 (3),  Discusses “the contributions of and roles for teacher leadership in special education.” References: 1.Gately, S.E., & Gately, F.J. (2001). Understanding Coteaching Componets. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 33 (4), Leadership in Special Edcuation: A Comparative Study by Kiera Chase gmail.com) & Sabrina Yacoub (yacoub. gmail.com).

3 1. Teachers will identify three developmental stages in the co-teaching process: the beginning stage, the compromise stage and the collaborative stage. Teachers will discuss their experiences with each of these stages. 2. Teachers will evaluate their perspectives of their teaching as they complete “The co-teaching rating scale” and compare results. Teachers will gain a better understanding of their co-teaching perspectives. 3. Teachers will discuss the roles for teacher leadership in special education.

4 1. Beginning Stage. At the beginning level of co-teaching teachers communicate superficially, as they develop a sense of boundaries and attempt to establish a professional working relationship. Moving from a social relationship to a professional relationship with a colleague may be difficult for some pairs of teachers. Some general educators may experience feelings of intrusion and invasion. Special educators may feel uncomfortable, detached, and excluded. At the beginning stage teachers may tread more slowly as they work to determine role expectations. Communication may be polite, guarded, and infrequent. Unless there is a clear sense of the developmental process and the goal of collaboration is a mutual one, teachers may get “stuck” at this level. It may be that much of the dissatisfaction that is noted in the literature regarding co-teaching is expressed by teachers who continue to interact at the beginning level.

5 2. Compromising Stage: Teachers who have adequate work relationships display more open and interactive communication. An increase in professional communication is evident. Although students benefit from this increase in communication, a sense of “give and take” and compromise pervades at this level. The special education teacher may be taking a more active role in the classroom teaching but, in doing so, may have had to “give up” something in return. The compromises at this stage help the co-teachers to build a level of trust that is necessary for them to move to a more collaborative partnership. Open and honest “give and take” is the essence of the third stage.

6 3 Collaborative Stage: At the collaborative level, teachers openly communicate and interact. Communication, humor, and a high degree of comfort punctuate the co-teaching, collaborative classroom. This high level of comfort is experienced by teachers, students, and even visitors. The two teachers work together and complement each other. At this stage, it is often difficult for outsiders to discern which teacher is the special educator and which is the general educator.

7 Leadership in Special Education: A Comparative Study By Kiera Chase & Sabrina Yacoub Special Education Teacher Leadership Skills & Perceptions: In 1975, PL94-142, the role of the Special Educator evolved from the classroom teacher to a multi-faceted leadership style role, called Education Specialist (Ed. Specialist), which is not dissimilar in skill sets one finds in an administrator (Passman, 2008). This researcher wonders what skill sets and competency areas one needs for success in this role since they are also ten times more likely to transfer to general education than are general educators likely to transfer to special education (Boe et al., 1997). What, if any, research that exists only creates more questions in regard to special education teacher leadership (Billingsley, 2007) (Sullivan, 2009) (York, 2005)

8  Research Questions 1. What perceptions do Education Specialists have toward their leadership skills? 2. What perceptions do Education Specialists have toward the importance of different leadership skills? 3. What perceptions do education specialists have towards the importance of different leadership skills to education specialists as a whole?

9  Billingsley Bonnie (2008) Leadership may be enhanced through:  Mentoring  Co-teaching/collaborating  Implementing school reforms  Collaborating with universities/research oriented  Developing instruction/curriculum Explore one of these aspects: Special Education/Regular Education Collaboration: In pairs complete “The Coteaching Rating Scale”: compare and discuss results.


Download ppt "Juliann Greene Debra Yasutake Marta Yang.  Main Article: Billingsley, B.S. (2007). Recognizing and Supporting the Critical Roles of Teachers in Special."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google