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By G.B. Shaw PYGMALION. Background & Ovid Information:  Source= Ovid’s Metamorphoses, X (8 AD)—a narrative poem that tells the origins/history of the.

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Presentation on theme: "By G.B. Shaw PYGMALION. Background & Ovid Information:  Source= Ovid’s Metamorphoses, X (8 AD)—a narrative poem that tells the origins/history of the."— Presentation transcript:

1 By G.B. Shaw PYGMALION

2 Background & Ovid

3 Information:  Source= Ovid’s Metamorphoses, X (8 AD)—a narrative poem that tells the origins/history of the world from a mythical-historical perspective—takes from Greek mythology, but some changes  Summary of section:  Pygmalion (sculptor) sees women as morally loose, and refuses to marry  Creates ivory statue of woman, and falls in love with his beautiful work  Embraces it, brings it gifts (generally speaking, things get weird)  Pygmalion thinks about requesting Venus (Roman goddess of love) to turn statue into woman; he doesn’t, but Venus grants unspoken request  Lies down next to statue and it becomes warm to the touch (IT’S ALIVE!)  Says “thanks” to Venus, and they end up having a kiddo CLASSICAL PYGMALION

4 Jean-Léon Gérôme, Pygmalion and Galatea, oil on canvas, c (Metropolitan Museum of Art)

5 Boris Vallejo, Pygmalion, 1988.

6  In groups, determine some similarities and differences between the myth and the play.  Illustrate those similarities/differences in a chart, table, Venn diagram, etc…Whatever you think works the best  Be ready to share similarities/differences with entire class  Jot down similarities/differences in your individual notes COMPARING MYTH TO DRAMA

7  SEE HANDOUT FOR INFORMATION LIFE OF G.B. SHAW

8 END OF TODAY’S POWERPOINT!

9 Preface Act I

10 "Shaw rewrites the Pygmalion legend as ironically as Joyce does the Odyssey. In Ovid, the sculptor Pygmalion, scornful of women, falls in love with his perfect female statue and obtains his prayer to Venus that she be given life so that he can marry her. Higgins shares Pygmalion’s misogyny (given a psychological motivation in his infantilist attachment to his mother) but there the resemblance ends. He does not fall in love with his artificial duchess; at best he is brought to admit that he has ‘grown accustomed to her face’. And in the most crucial reworking of the original, the ‘statue’ Liza is not merely his artifact, and does not quietly accept her fate to be married off to her maker. The great strength of the part of Liza is that, from the beginning, she has the capacity to resist Higgins” (xvi). EXCERPT FROM INTRODUCTION

11  “I wish to boast that Pygmalion has been an extremely successful play, both on stage and on screen, all over Europe and North America as well as at home. It is so intensely and deliberately didactic [intending to teach/instruct], and its subject is esteemed so dry, that I delight in throwing it at the heads of the wiseacres who repeat the parrot cry that art should never be didactic. It goes to prove my contention that great art can never be anything else.” p. 7  “Ambitious flower-girls who read this play must not imagine that they can pass themselves off as fine ladies by untutored imitation. They must learn their alphabet over again, and different, from a phonetic expert. Imitation will only make them ridiculous.” p. 7  What is the purpose of the preface? PREFACE: A PROFESSOR OF PHONETICS

12  Stage Direction: Economical exposition and suggestive of social background  Prefatory Essay: Used to express his doctrines/thoughts on art/language  Discussion in the play: Shaw regards social criticism as the most important function of all art; he satirizes the socioeconomic classes  Source: /English_Literature/shaw/ Pygmalion.html /English_Literature/shaw/ Pygmalion.html SHAW’S STYLE

13  London, Early 1900s  Social Structure:  Upper Class  people with inherited wealth; old families; aristocrats  Middle Class  The majority of the population  industrialists, professionals, business people, shop owners  Lower or Working Class  Agricultural, mine and factory workers, etc. SETTING

14 LONDON PICTURES Covent Garden, London 1900

15 LONDON PICTURES Drawing Room, London 1900

16 DUCHESS, 1900

17  Professor Henry Higgins  Colonel Pickering CHARACTERS (SEE HANDOUT)

18  Eliza Doolittle  Alfred Doolittle CHARACTERS CONTINUED

19  Mrs. Pearce  Mrs. Higgins CHARACTERS CONTINUED

20  Freddy Eynsford-Hill  Mrs. Eynsford- Hill  Colonel Pickering  Mrs. Higgins CHARACTERS CONTINUED

21  What was the big deal with language in the play, anyway?  Does language influence modern American society in similar ways? How so/not? IMPORTANCE OF SPEECH/LANGUAGE

22  Clip 1 Clip 1  Listen to the clip, and jot down any thoughts that come to mind about the person. Consider where she might be from, what social class she might belong to, what her education might be like, what she might look like, etc. ***I understand that you do not actually know the person in the video, so you cannot write authoritatively on the subject. Just give it a try for the exercise’s sake. CLIP 1: PERCEPTION?

23  Clip 2 Clip 2  Listen to the clip, and jot down any thoughts that come to mind about the person. Consider where she might be from, what social class she might belong to, what her education might be like, what she might look like, etc. ***I understand that you do not actually know the person in the video, so you cannot write authoritatively on the subject. Just give it a try for the exercise’s sake. CLIP 2: PERCEPTION?

24  Clip 3 Clip 3  Listen to the clip, and jot down any thoughts that come to mind about the person. Consider where he might be from, what social class he might belong to, what his education might be like, what he might look like, etc. ***I understand that you do not actually know the person in the video, so you cannot write authoritatively on the subject. Just give it a try for the exercise’s sake. CLIP 3: PERCEPTION?

25  Clip 4 Clip 4  Listen to the clip, and jot down any thoughts that come to mind about the person. Consider where he might be from, what social class he might belong to, what his education might be like, what he might look like, etc. ***I understand that you do not actually know the person in the video, so you cannot write authoritatively on the subject. Just give it a try for the exercise’s sake. CLIP 4: PERCEPTION?

26  Clip 5 Clip 5  Listen to the clip, and jot down any thoughts that come to mind about the person. Consider where she might be from, what social class she might belong to, what her education might be like, what she might look like, etc. ***I understand that you do not actually know the person in the video, so you cannot write authoritatively on the subject. Just give it a try for the exercise’s sake. CLIP 5: PERCEPTION?

27 LET’S FIGURE OUT ROLES FOR PERFORMANCES NEXT CLASS! Mrs. Pearce Higgins Flower Girl Pickering

28 END OF TODAY’S POWERPOINT!

29 ACT II Part 1 (performances)


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