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Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Implications for the Deaconate In Honor of Deacon Bill TothNADD April 24, 2015.

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Presentation on theme: "Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Implications for the Deaconate In Honor of Deacon Bill TothNADD April 24, 2015."— Presentation transcript:

1 Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Work, Leisure, and Their Integration Implications for the Deaconate In Honor of Deacon Bill TothNADD April 24, 2015

2 Divided Life The split between the faith which many profess and their daily lives deserves to be counted among the more serious errors of our age.... [L]et there be no false opposition between professional and social activities on the one hand, and religious life on the other (Gaudium et spes, 43). The split between the faith which many profess and their daily lives deserves to be counted among the more serious errors of our age.... [L]et there be no false opposition between professional and social activities on the one hand, and religious life on the other (Gaudium et spes, 43).

3 Big Questions  What am I Working for?  What am I Resting in?  What am I Living for?

4 WORK LEISURE INTEGRATION

5 Work as Job Economic Return (extrinsic motivation) “If work is so great how come they pay us to do it” (Mike Royko).

6 Leisure as Amusement Entertaining Culture Entertaining Culture “They know its been me they have been coming to see to forget about life for awhile” (Billy Joel). “They know its been me they have been coming to see to forget about life for awhile” (Billy Joel). “Instead of being the moment when we rediscover ourselves, thinking about who we ought to be, leisure is “the moment when amusements succeed to the maximum in making [us]... forget” (Jacques Ellul). “Instead of being the moment when we rediscover ourselves, thinking about who we ought to be, leisure is “the moment when amusements succeed to the maximum in making [us]... forget” (Jacques Ellul).

7 Weekend Getaway “Your body checks in and your mind checks out.”

8 Dies Domini on Sunday “[W]hen Sunday loses its fundamental meaning and becomes merely part of a ‘weekend’, it can happen that people stay locked within a horizon so limited that they can no longer see ‘the heavens’. Hence, though ready to celebrate, they are really incapable of doing so” (John Paul II).

9 Integration Gratifications Consumerism: Having over Being Consumerism: Having over Being  “The great danger in today’s world, pervaded as it is by consumerism, is the desolation and anguish born of a complacent yet covetous heart, the feverish pursuit of frivolous pleasures, and a blunted conscience” (Francis) Principles of Consumerism Principles of Consumerism  Choice is the highest value, not the content of the choice.  Choice Operates without a Call

10 WORK LEISURE INTEGRATION JobAmusementGratification

11 Work as Vocation Vocare: “to call”—a calling to give Vocare: “to call”—a calling to give   To be Human—the Universal Call to Holiness (Being): A person “cannot fully find himself except through a sincere gift of himself” (Gaudium et spes, 24).   To a State of Life (Belonging): to give ourselves in the religious, ordained and lay state.   To a Particular Way of Work (Doing): Work “constitutes one of the fundamental dimensions of [our] earthly existence and of [our] vocation” precisely because our work allows us to exercise our gifts in serving others (John Paul II).

12 Work as Giving Logic of Gift and the Gospel of Work Work as Giving Logic of Gift and the Gospel of Work The Logic of Gift: A Lesson from Native Americans The “Gospel of Work”   Work continues Creation: “Collaborators with God” not “individual utility maximizers”; “stewards” not “owners.”   Work is Fallen: not just about markets or laws, but vice (injustice) and sin (greed and pride).   Work can be Redeemed: sanctified suffering not despair; alleviating suffering not causing it.

13 Leisure as Contemplation An Act of “Receivement”: fostering a “contemplative outlook” to receive the world. An Act of “Receivement”: fostering a “contemplative outlook” to receive the world. Three habits of leisure/resting/receiving: Three habits of leisure/resting/receiving:  Habit of Solitude: Daily Silence  Habit of Celebration: The Lord’s Day (Dies Domini)  Habit of Service: Going to the Margins

14 The fruit of SILENCE is Prayer The fruit of SILENCE is Prayer The fruit of PRAYER is Faith The fruit of PRAYER is Faith The fruit of FAITH is Love The fruit of FAITH is Love The fruit of LOVE is Service The fruit of LOVE is Service The fruit of SERVICE is Peace The fruit of SERVICE is Peace

15 Integration Integrity Integritas: (two meanings)   Integer, to be whole, integration   To be untouched, unblemished   “Without prolonged moments of adoration, of prayerful encounter with the word, of sincere conversation with the Lord, our work easily becomes meaningless; we lose energy as a result of weariness and difficulties, and our fervor dies out” (Pope Francis).

16 Vocation(giving)Contemplation (receiving ) Integrity(Being) Job(getting)Amusement(escaping)Gratification(Having) WORK LEISURE INTEGRATION

17 Examen Personal Personal  Where do you see yourself on the matrix?  How does you leisure positively inform your work?  What are the blockages that prevent you from a deeper integration of work and leisure? Ministerial Ministerial  Where do your parishioners see themselves on the matrix? What is the cultural narrative that puts them there?  As deacons, how can you help your parishioners to see their work as a vocation and their leisure as contemplation?

18 “God created me to do Him some definite service; He has committed some work to me which He has not committed to another. I have my mission—I never may know it fully in this life, but I shall be told it in the next. Somehow, I am necessary to His purposes…I am a link in a chain, a bond of connection between persons. He had not created me for naught” (John Henry Newman).

19 The Benedictine Synthesis

20 Worship Leisure

21 What to Read? John Paul II, John Paul II, –Dies Domini, – Laborem exercens, Chapter 5 on Developing a Spiritual of Work. Vocation of the Business Leader, Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace Vocation of the Business Leader, Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace

22 Habit of Service (Dies Domini) The Eucharist is an event and programme of true brotherhood. From the Sunday Mass there flows a tide of charity destined to spread into the whole life of the faithful, beginning by inspiring the very way in which they live the rest of Sunday. If Sunday is a day of joy, Christians should declare by their actual behaviour that we cannot be happy "on our own". They look around to find people who may need their help. It may be that in their neighbourhood or among those they know there are sick people, elderly people, children or immigrants who precisely on Sundays feel more keenly their isolation, needs and suffering. It is true that commitment to these people cannot be restricted to occasional Sunday gestures. But presuming a wider sense of commitment, why not make the Lord's Day a more intense time of sharing, encouraging all the inventiveness of which Christian charity is capable? Inviting to a meal people who are alone, visiting the sick, providing food for needy families, spending a few hours in voluntary work and acts of solidarity: these would certainly be ways of bringing into people's lives the love of Christ received at the Eucharistic table. The Eucharist is an event and programme of true brotherhood. From the Sunday Mass there flows a tide of charity destined to spread into the whole life of the faithful, beginning by inspiring the very way in which they live the rest of Sunday. If Sunday is a day of joy, Christians should declare by their actual behaviour that we cannot be happy "on our own". They look around to find people who may need their help. It may be that in their neighbourhood or among those they know there are sick people, elderly people, children or immigrants who precisely on Sundays feel more keenly their isolation, needs and suffering. It is true that commitment to these people cannot be restricted to occasional Sunday gestures. But presuming a wider sense of commitment, why not make the Lord's Day a more intense time of sharing, encouraging all the inventiveness of which Christian charity is capable? Inviting to a meal people who are alone, visiting the sick, providing food for needy families, spending a few hours in voluntary work and acts of solidarity: these would certainly be ways of bringing into people's lives the love of Christ received at the Eucharistic table.

23 Our Calling in Weakness “Consider your own calling, brothers and sisters. Not many of you were wise by human standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. Rather, God chose the foolish of the world to shame the wise, and God chose the weak of the world to shame the strong, and God chose the lowly and despised of the world, those who count for nothing, to reduce to nothing those who are something, so that no human being might boast before God” (1Cor. 1: 26-29). “Consider your own calling, brothers and sisters. Not many of you were wise by human standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth. Rather, God chose the foolish of the world to shame the wise, and God chose the weak of the world to shame the strong, and God chose the lowly and despised of the world, those who count for nothing, to reduce to nothing those who are something, so that no human being might boast before God” (1Cor. 1: 26-29).

24 Michael Naughton John A. Ryan Institute for Catholic Social Thought Center for Catholic Studies University of St. Thomas 651-962-5712 mjnaughton@stthomas.edu


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