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Additional Literary Terms You’re Welcome! You’re Welcome!

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Presentation on theme: "Additional Literary Terms You’re Welcome! You’re Welcome!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Additional Literary Terms You’re Welcome! You’re Welcome!

2 Consonance Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds, but not vowels, as in assonance.assonance Example:lady lounges lazily, dark deep dread crept in Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds, but not vowels, as in assonance.assonance Example:lady lounges lazily, dark deep dread crept in

3 Assonance Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds but not consonant sounds as in consonance. consonance. Examples: fleet feet sweep by sleeping geeks. Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds but not consonant sounds as in consonance. consonance. Examples: fleet feet sweep by sleeping geeks.

4 Synecdoche Synecdoche is a type of metaphor; one word or a part that represents the whole. Examples: One man can change his stars. All hands on deck. Lend me your ears. Synecdoche is a type of metaphor; one word or a part that represents the whole. Examples: One man can change his stars. All hands on deck. Lend me your ears.

5 Metonymy Metonymy is substituting a word for another word closely associated with it. Examples: White House The White House said in a press release. crown The peasants bowed to the crown. central office The central office makes the rules. Metonymy is substituting a word for another word closely associated with it. Examples: White House The White House said in a press release. crown The peasants bowed to the crown. central office The central office makes the rules.

6 Malapropism Malapropism is an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, esp. by the confusion of words that are similar in sound. Example: You say one thing but mean your mother. Or, on a more serious note: You say weary when you mean wary. Malapropism is an act or habit of misusing words ridiculously, esp. by the confusion of words that are similar in sound. Example: You say one thing but mean your mother. Or, on a more serious note: You say weary when you mean wary.

7 Anaphora Anaphora [LLat. Gk. anapherein, to repeat: ana-, again + pherein, to carry] The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs. One of the devices of repetition, in which the same phrase is repeated at the beginning of two or more lines. Anaphora [LLat. Gk. anapherein, to repeat: ana-, again + pherein, to carry] The deliberate repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of several successive verses, clauses, or paragraphs. One of the devices of repetition, in which the same phrase is repeated at the beginning of two or more lines.

8 Paradox Paradox is a seeming contradiction. Ex. The blind prophet (someone who can see the truth/future). Innate wisdom in the uneducated. Parents who want their children to have an easier life, but are then disappointed in their kids for having it too easy. Paradox is a seeming contradiction. Ex. The blind prophet (someone who can see the truth/future). Innate wisdom in the uneducated. Parents who want their children to have an easier life, but are then disappointed in their kids for having it too easy.

9 Verisimilitude The appearance of truth; the quality of seeming to be true. Something that has the appearance of being true or real.

10 Character Foil Foil is a character that contrasts second character that highlights certain qualities of that first character. Ex: Tybalt/Romeo (the fighter/the lover) Foil is a character that contrasts second character that highlights certain qualities of that first character. Ex: Tybalt/Romeo (the fighter/the lover)

11 Anachronism Anachronism something that occurs out of its time period. Example: The clocks in Julius Caesar 1962 Pennies in the opening scene of 1932 set To Kill a Mockingbird Music from A Knight’s Tale/Mulin Rouge Knight’s Tale and the Nike Swoop. Anachronism something that occurs out of its time period. Example: The clocks in Julius Caesar 1962 Pennies in the opening scene of 1932 set To Kill a Mockingbird Music from A Knight’s Tale/Mulin Rouge Knight’s Tale and the Nike Swoop.

12 Oral Tradition Oral tradition is the way in which stories were passed down from generation to generation before written language was common.

13 Epic An Epic is a long poem about the adventures of a hero or of the gods. Ex. The Odyssey is an epic about Odysseus’ ten-year journey home. Other Epics: Virgil’s Aeneid, Don Juan, Paradise Lost, The Divine Comedy, Beowulf, Metamorphoses, Gilgamesh, and of course, The Iliad An Epic is a long poem about the adventures of a hero or of the gods. Ex. The Odyssey is an epic about Odysseus’ ten-year journey home. Other Epics: Virgil’s Aeneid, Don Juan, Paradise Lost, The Divine Comedy, Beowulf, Metamorphoses, Gilgamesh, and of course, The Iliad

14 Kenning Is a compound expression used in place of a name or noun. Examples: Whale-road = ocean Flashing-steel=sword Light of battle=sword Battle sweat=blood Is a compound expression used in place of a name or noun. Examples: Whale-road = ocean Flashing-steel=sword Light of battle=sword Battle sweat=blood

15 Beot Beot (Anglo-Saxon: "vow"; becomes Modern English "boast") A ritualized boast or vow first made publicly by Anglo-Saxon warriors known as thegns before the hlaford in a mead- hall the night before a military engagement. A typical warrior's boast might be that he would be the first to strike a blow in the coming battle, that he would kill a particular champion among the enemy, that he would not take a single step backward in retreat during the battle, that he would claim a renowned sword from an enemy warrior as booty, and so on. Example: From A Knight’s Tale: Introductory speech by Chaucer for Ulrich/William. Tons of them in Beowulf Beot (Anglo-Saxon: "vow"; becomes Modern English "boast") A ritualized boast or vow first made publicly by Anglo-Saxon warriors known as thegns before the hlaford in a mead- hall the night before a military engagement. A typical warrior's boast might be that he would be the first to strike a blow in the coming battle, that he would kill a particular champion among the enemy, that he would not take a single step backward in retreat during the battle, that he would claim a renowned sword from an enemy warrior as booty, and so on. Example: From A Knight’s Tale: Introductory speech by Chaucer for Ulrich/William. Tons of them in Beowulf

16 Xenia Xenia is the Greek concept of the guest/host reciprocal relationship. Concept at the heart of the Greek culture. It is not as simple as “hospitality.” Hospitality in our culture is voluntary. It is an obligation/ bond, between the two Xenos and is hereditary You would choose a Xenos based on your social station. Xenia was mandatory, and enforced by none other than Zeus Xenios. Violators were punished! Translation: If you eat at my table or sleep under my roof, I will do you no harm, and you will do me no harm. onlyAFTER You can only ask the identify of a guest AFTER you have fed him. Interesting tidbit: it is the source of our word Xenophobia— fear of strangers (Xenos--foreigner) Xenia is the Greek concept of the guest/host reciprocal relationship. Concept at the heart of the Greek culture. It is not as simple as “hospitality.” Hospitality in our culture is voluntary. It is an obligation/ bond, between the two Xenos and is hereditary You would choose a Xenos based on your social station. Xenia was mandatory, and enforced by none other than Zeus Xenios. Violators were punished! Translation: If you eat at my table or sleep under my roof, I will do you no harm, and you will do me no harm. onlyAFTER You can only ask the identify of a guest AFTER you have fed him. Interesting tidbit: it is the source of our word Xenophobia— fear of strangers (Xenos--foreigner)

17 The Iliad The Iliad The Iliad is an epic depicting the adventures around the Trojan War. With heroes like: Achilles, Odysseus, and Hector. This war was started because of Helen, Paris, Menelaus, and the violation of the concept of Xenia. The Iliad The Iliad is an epic depicting the adventures around the Trojan War. With heroes like: Achilles, Odysseus, and Hector. This war was started because of Helen, Paris, Menelaus, and the violation of the concept of Xenia.

18 The Odyssey The Odyssey The Odyssey is an epic depicting the adventures of Odysseus and his men over a ten-year journey (odyssey) back to their home island of Ithaca.


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