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Knowledge (Use/ Price) By: Gina Kass, Damani Johnson, Rianne Brink, Hunter Reagan, and Trey Purdon “Of what a strange nature is knowledge! It clings to.

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Presentation on theme: "Knowledge (Use/ Price) By: Gina Kass, Damani Johnson, Rianne Brink, Hunter Reagan, and Trey Purdon “Of what a strange nature is knowledge! It clings to."— Presentation transcript:

1 Knowledge (Use/ Price) By: Gina Kass, Damani Johnson, Rianne Brink, Hunter Reagan, and Trey Purdon “Of what a strange nature is knowledge! It clings to the mind, when it has once seized on it, like a lichen on the rock (Shelley 85).

2 What Is Knowledge? 1. acquaintance with facts, truths, or principles, as from study or investigation; general erudition: knowledge of many things. 2. familiarity or conversance, as with a particular subject or branch of learning: A knowledge of accounting was necessary for the job. 3. acquaintance or familiarity gained by sight, experience, or report: a knowledge of human nature. 4. the fact or state of knowing; the perception of fact or truth; clear and certain mental apprehension. 5. awareness, as of a fact or circumstance: He had knowledge of her good fortune.

3 Relation To Frankenstein The use and price of knowledge relates to Frankenstein because both Frankenstein and the Creature strove to acquire knowledge, and their pursuit of knowledge caused them, and society immense pain. Frankenstein was guilt ridden due to the “birth” of the Creature, a horrendous revenant who seeks revenge against Frankenstein and those close to them causing copious destruction. The Creature experiences an astounding epiphany that indubitably causes him to learn that he will never be socially acceptable, and this knowledge corrupts him.

4 “I beheld the wretch- the miserable monster whom I had created...He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped,..Oh! No mortal could support the horror of that countenance” (Shelley 36). Frankenstein spent years acquiring the necessary knowledge to discover the secret of reanimation however, upon seeing his creation, he realizes some things weren’t meant to be discovered.

5 “I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature. In spite of the intense labour and wonderful discoveries of modern philosophers, I always came from my studies discontented and unsatisfied” (Shelley 21).

6 After studying the works of Paracelsus and Albertus Magnus, the secret nature of scientific knowledge prompts Victor’s obsessive desire to go further in his endeavor for the omnipotent secret of life.

7 “Learn from me, if not by my precepts, then by my example, how dangerous is the pursuit of knowledge and how much happier is that man who believes his native town to be the world than he who aspires to be greater than his nature will allow” (Shelley 56). The dangers inherent in the reckless pursuit of knowledge is a theme prevalent in the novel. After his experiences with the Creature, Frankenstein realizes that the price of some knowledge is too much to bear.

8 “My days were spent in close attention, that I might more speedily master the language; and I may boast that I improved more rapidly than the Arabian, who understood very little and conversed in broken accents, whilst I comprehended and could imitate almost every word that was spoken. While I improved in speed, I also learned the science of letters as it was taught to the stranger; and this opened before me a wide fetch of wonder and delight” (Shelley 84). The creature’s thirst for knowledge allowed him to quickly master the art of language, opening his eyes to the world as though he were a normal person. It is with this new found ability that allows him to befriend a blind man, who teaches him that true friendship is acquired through acceptance of one’s inner self rather than outer appearance. However, this idealistic philosophy is incompatible with the society in which the Creature inhabits.

9 “At first I had neglected them, but now that I was able to decipher the characters in which they were written, I began to study them with diligence...Everything is related in them which bears reference to my accursed origin; the whole detail of that series of disgusting circumstances which produced it is set in view; the minutest description of my odious and loathsome person is given, in language which painted your own horrors and rendered mine indelible” (Shelley 92).

10 After reading Frankenstein’s critique of his creation, the Creature realizes that his appearance has rendered him an outcast. If the Creature had never gained the ability to read, he would never have had to pay the price of finding out the painful truth about himself.

11 Works Cited (quotes) Frankenstein by Mary Shelley


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