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Typical or Troubled? ® Know the Difference, Make a Difference A Program of The American Psychiatric Foundation 1 Typical or Troubled? ®

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Presentation on theme: "Typical or Troubled? ® Know the Difference, Make a Difference A Program of The American Psychiatric Foundation 1 Typical or Troubled? ®"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Typical or Troubled? ® Know the Difference, Make a Difference A Program of The American Psychiatric Foundation 1 Typical or Troubled? ®

3 2 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Introductions Please briefly state your: 1) Name 2) MHP, counselor, other? 3) School or Organization? 4) Typical or Troubled?

4 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008  To advance public understanding that mental illnesses are real and can be effectively treated.  Established 1991—Diverse Board of Directors  Charitable Arm of American Psychiatric Association  Raise Funds and Awareness  Conduct Public Education & Outreach Programs  Patient, Family and Community Focused Mission of APF

5 Approximately 1/3 of adolescents with major depressive disorder also suffer from another mental disorder. False It’s 2/3

6 Mental Illness in U.S. Children 20% of youngsters age 9-17 have diagnosable psychiatric disorders with at least minimum impairment 10% suffer from severe mental illness causing significant impairment Fewer than one in 5 receive needed treatment in any given year Note that one out of five kids in the pediatrician’s office has an emotional disorder

7 Mental Illness in U.S. Adolescents 90% have early warning signs by age 15 Those who develop a mental disorder, 90% have early warning signs by age 15…….some even earlier Anxiety disorders often begin in late childhood, mood disorders in late adolescents, and substance abuse in early 20’s. Suicide third leading cause of death among teens 15 to 24 years old. Unlike most cancers or heart disease, young people with mental disorders suffer disability when they are in the prime of their life. (NIMH)

8 Mental Illness in U.S. Adolescents Despite effective treatments, there are long delays — sometimes decades — between first onset of symptoms and when people seek and receive treatment (NIMH) Early identification and connecting to help is critically important

9 No help = Pain Suffering Failing Those with a untreated mental health disorder, three times more likely to develop a subsequent disorder, compared to students with no previous disorder 8 Typical or Troubled? ®

10 HELP = Better academic achievement Less substance abuse Improved chances for their future 9 Typical or Troubled? ®

11 10 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Research on greatest impact Who do we target for education for greatest impact? Research shows:  School personnel – teachers and other school personnel: Trusted and listened to by kids Interactive with parent, kids and counselors Want to help, believe it is their job to help teens Want to avoid consequences of not acting Want information from a credible source– not misinformation Want to know the difference between typical or troubled  Needed now more than ever

12 11 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Typical or Troubled? ™ Program Objectives  Goal: Reduce the gap between on-set and treatment  Objective: Educate school personnel about teen/adolescent mental health Science of mental illness Notice, Talk, Act – Notice the early warning signs – Talk with students – Talk to parents – imperative and a barrier – Act – by connecting to the school referral process - refer to treatment  Target audiences for education: Teachers, coaches, bus drivers, administrators, and other school personnel, administrators

13 12 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 What’s in it for them? This is what teachers / school personnel tell us…… See the signs and don’t know what to do, want to know Want to help, most believe it is their job to help teens Want to avoid consequences of not acting Appreciate information from a credible source– not misinformation Want to know the difference between typical or troubled Want to know how to refer Don’t want to be “jr. psychiatrists”  School personnel – teachers and other school personnel: Trusted and listened to by kids Interact with students, parents and counselors

14 13 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 School Community Informed Program Research based program Community informed every element Materials developed with school community and experts Focus groups tested Piloted and revised Evaluated over 7 years

15 14 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Local urban, rural and suburban schools from Alaska to Florida Implemented in 900 school sites and or districts Educating 90,000+ school personnel Connecting with more than a million students Typical or Troubled?™

16 15 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Increased Knowledge of Mental Health

17 16 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 I know how to….if I see the warning signs

18 Qualitative Evaluations 2013: Typical or Troubled? TM © 2012 American Psychiatric Foundation “Large training, part of an all-day, in-service training with 350 attendees. Local media (TV and print) reported on adolescent mental health.” Ben Harrington- MHA of East Tennessee (rural area) “ I’ve gotten over 100 referrals since the training.” Christina Fontenot- Ville Platte High School (rural area) Very well received! Local psychiatrist presented …we loved having them and the teachers had a lot of questions which they could answer. Teachers felt empowered - knew the referral process. Patti Morton- FCUSD Health Programs “ Most exciting this year -- added a youth speaker which was very well received!” JoDee Buis- Orange County Public Schools in Orlando, Florida INCREDIBLE RESPONSE from CA Department of Mental Health: “ In days following, a tremendous amount of teachers approached me one-on-one to talk about the problems they were seeing with their students.”

19 Qualitative Evaluations © 2012 American Psychiatric Foundation “In-service training with 350 attendees. Local media reported on adolescent mental health.” Ben Harrington- MHA of East Tennessee “Teachers, staff and administrators have been very proactive. I’ve gotten over 100 referrals since the training.” Christina Fontenot- Ville Platte High School Information very well received! Local psychiatrist presented …we loved having them and the teachers had a lot of questions which they could answer. Teachers felt empowered, better understood the referral process. Patti Morton- FCUSD Health Programs

20 19 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Measures of Success Expanded Awareness of NTA and mental health issues Collaboration Educating Parents Increased Referrals Preventing Tragedy Ready to Implement - Curriculum Catalyst for Referral Process

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22 Instructions, Customization, Teams

23 Article & Handouts 22 Typical or Troubled? ®

24 Evaluations, Suggestions 23 Typical or Troubled? ®

25 Checklist 24 Typical or Troubled? ®

26 25 Typical or Troubled? ®

27 26 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Typical or Troubled?® Modeling and Practice  Section 1: Introduction  Section 2: Early Warning Signs

28 27 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Modeling and Practice  Section 3: Mental Health Disorders  Section 4: Connecting to Help  Section 5: Referral Process  Section 6: Managing Classroom, Engaging Parents, Resources

29 SAMPLE SLIDES Presentation for Teachers & Staff Typical or Troubled? ® Know the Difference, Make a Difference A Program of the American Psychiatric Foundation 28 Typical or Troubled? ®

30 TODAY’S PRESENTATION Treatment Steps to take Warning signs Normal teen development Types of mental health problems Referral process Talking to parents Managing the Classroom State of the problem 29 Typical or Troubled? ®

31 (Insert Name of School) 30 Typical or Troubled? ®

32 Everyone Can Make a Difference Every Adult School Staff Parents 31 Typical or Troubled? ®

33 32 Typical or Troubled? TM Marked change in school performance Inability to cope Physical complaints Sexual acting out Depression Abuse of alcohol/ drugs Intense fear of becoming obese Nightmares Threat to harm self or others Self-injury Frequent outbursts Threats to run away Aggression Unusual behavior 32 Typical or Troubled? ®

34 33 Typical or Troubled? TM Mood disorders Anxiety disorders Psychotic disorders Behavioral/disruptive disorders Teen Mental Health Disorders

35 34 Typical or Troubled? TM Typical? Troubled? 34 Typical or Troubled? ®

36 Complex period of rapid change, transition Challenges: fitting in, defining identity, competing demands (school, home) Sometimes - other home issues (divorce, violence or substance abuse) Bottom line: May display alterations of mood, distressing thoughts, anxiety, and impulsive behavior. Typical Teens 35 Typical or Troubled? ®

37 36 Typical or Troubled? TM Experiencing more than normal developmental challenges Without treatment, more likely to have serious problems: Academic Relationships Employment Signs of Trouble 36 Typical or Troubled? ®

38 37 Typical or Troubled? TM As you NOTICE signs, ask yourself, are they: FREQUENT ? –(e.g., student is quiet, withdrawn over multiple days/weeks) EXTREME ? –(e.g., violent outburst) If either: TALK with student ACT by communicating what you’ve seen/heard with school MH staff 37 Typical or Troubled? ® Typical or Troubled? ®

39 Customizable 38 Typical or Troubled? ®

40 39 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 The Team

41 TEACHER talks to student TEACHER identifies a cause for concern in a student TEACHER notifies SCHOOL COUNSELOR assigned to student (or CASE MANAGER for special ed students) PROCESS IN A SCHOOL STUDENT and SCHOOL COUNSELOR meet SCHOOL COUNSELOR handles problem OR SCHOOL COUNSELOR provides information on outside resources SCHOOL SOCIAL WORKER or PSYCHOLOGIST or other is engaged if needed – PARENT involved If problem identified as a behavior/conduct problem, student is sent to ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL – PARENT involved PSYCHOLOGISTPSYCHIATRIST SOCIAL WORKER MH COUNSELOR 40 Typical or Troubled? ®

42 41 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 REFERRAL HANDOUT  Break into small groups Teams from school/districts include counselor/school champ and MHP Those with one presenter join in small group  Discuss the referral process in your school – what happens first, who do teachers connect to? Next, After that?  Write it down – KEEP IT SIMPLE  Fill in referral slide boxes  Remember you are not designing the system – you are communicating what happens

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44 43 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008

45 44 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Lessons Learned Over a Decade Work with and in the Educational System National and local partners Messenger as important as message In-Service -- Scheduled presentation ACT - No One Size Fits All – Referral Process How to TALK to students/parents NOTICE Early Warning Signs – How does it appear in the class room

46 NOTICETALKACT 45 Typical or Troubled? ®

47 46 Typical or Troubled? TM Changing a Life’s Course 46 Typical or Troubled? ®

48 47 © American Psychiatric Foundation, 2008 Typical or Troubled?® TAP - Technical Assistance Partnership Program Innovation Grant Standard Grant Applications being accepted – March 31 st deadline


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