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Painting in Taisho and early Showa Autonomy and Social Responsibility of the Artist--following J. Thomas Rimer.

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Presentation on theme: "Painting in Taisho and early Showa Autonomy and Social Responsibility of the Artist--following J. Thomas Rimer."— Presentation transcript:

1 Painting in Taisho and early Showa Autonomy and Social Responsibility of the Artist--following J. Thomas Rimer

2 Takamura Kôtarô ( ) Poet and sculptor, study in Paris 1910 “The Green Sun” –“I desire absolute freedom of art. Consequently, I recognize the limitless authority of the individuality of the artist. I would like to make the starting point the evaluation of this individuality. I would like to study individuality itself and not question its existence. If another man sees an object I believe is green but that he says is red, I would like to evaluate the manner in which he handles the red object--based on the assumption that the object is indeed red. I do not want to question his belief that the object is red. Rather, I welcome him because his conception of nature differs from mine. I want to know to what degree he has captured the truth of nature; I also want to know the depth and richness of his emotions. Even if two or three artists should paint a ‘green sun,” I would never criticize them, for I myself may see a ‘green sun’ at some point.” As quoted in Rimer, “Three Japanese Painters in Paris,” Pilgrimages (UHPress, 1988): 28. Copyright (c) Cygnus Software Ltd. Portions of this page Copyright Muze Inc.For personal use only. All rights reserved.

3 Late 19 th c. interest in color; experimentation with symbol How do you see these trees? They are yellow. So, put in yellow; this shadow, rather blue, paint it with pure ultramarine; these red leaves? Put in vermilion. –Purportedly Gaugan’s suggestion to Serusier Paul Serusier, “Talisman” 1888 Talisman 1888

4 Late 19 th c. French interest in Japan Toulouse-Latrec, 1892 “Le Divan Japonaise” Pierre Bonnard, 1899 “Nursemaid’s Promenade”

5 Fujita Tsuguji ( ) “Assimilator” Tsugouharu Foujita, Léonard Foujita Catholic convert Opportunist? –Leader of Army Art Association –Art in service to nat’l defense 1910 graduate Tokyo School of Fine Arts, to Paris 1913

6 Fujita Tsuguji Successful painter in Paris, 1920s 1927 “Two Female Nudes”“Two Female Nudes” French critiques praised the blending of East and West.

7 Fujita Tsuguji, Saipan

8 Fujita’s “Attu”

9 Fujita Tsuguji 1950 returns to France, naturalizes, becomes Catholic

10 Saeki Yûzô Saeki Yûzô ( ) Maintain Japanese identity with sincerity Excelled in “academic” work Maurice Vlaminck advice to “develop own style” Returns briefly to Tokyo in 1926 Suicide in Paris, 1928 Feted in Tokyo, 1929

11 Saeki Yûzô Left: Posters and the Terrace of a Café 1927 (Bridgestone Museum) Right: Vlaminck’s 1905 Restaurant de la Machine at Bougival

12 Saeki Yûzô “Posters” 1927

13 Umehara Ryûzaburô ( ) Synthesis with nobility of spirit?--linklink

14 Umehara Ryûzaburô 1940 Changan St., Peking

15 Miyamoto Saburô “Oil Painting” and Western inspiration Liberty Leading the People, o/c, 1830, Musee du Louvre Image courtesy of Mark Harden's Artchive

16 Foujita and Miyamoto in Paris

17 Yokoyama Taikan Okakura Tenshin student Widespread popularity for capturing the Japanese essence Link to examplesLink Shokodo, Ltd copyright, 2004, JAA04060, courtesy Menard Co.

18 Sesshu and Ryôanji--15th c. Matsumoto Shunsuke defense of freedom of expression through assertion of Japanese tradition of artistic subjectivity and intuition [See Sandler, “Living Artist.”]


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