Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

TOP 10 STRATEGIES TO DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION Jacque Melin

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "TOP 10 STRATEGIES TO DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION Jacque Melin"— Presentation transcript:

1

2 TOP 10 STRATEGIES TO DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION Jacque Melin

3 Thank you for being present today You can expect: conversations learning

4 I’m counting on you to… learn from one another actively participate commit to a partnership in this journey (cell) (office)

5 A Definition of Differentiated Instruction (DI) Diane Ravitch defines differentiating instruction as a form of instruction that seeks to "maximize each student's growth by recognizing that students have different ways of learning, different interests, and different ways of responding to instruction.”

6 (continued) "In practice, it involves offering several different learning experiences in response to students' varied needs. Educators may vary learning activities and materials by difficulty, so as to challenge students at different readiness levels; by topic, in response to students' interests; and by students' preferred ways of learning or expressing themselves" (p. 75).

7 Dr. Carol Ann TomlinsonTomlinson University of Virginia Distinguished Professor ASCD and Solution Tree Author

8 Researcher Theodore Sizer says: “… while it may be inconvenient that students differ, it is an irrefutable fact of life in the classroom.” (Source of slide: Cornelius Watts, LF, GaDOE)

9

10 What do you predict will be the top 10 differentiated instructional strategies?

11

12 # Pre-assessment Not the least important because it is number 10. You cannot differentiate for readiness until you pre-assess. Can be formal or informal. Use data to plan lessons for diverse readiness levels.

13 Types of informal pre-assessments Quick Write - might sound very ordinary, but as a pre-assessment it can reveal a lot by asking a ‘big idea’ question; student answers can uncover what they understand, what misconceptions they may have, or the reasoning processes they are using. They are given only 1-3 minutes to write an answer (thus 'quick write') Example: "How do electrical devices work?" Graphic Organizer - there are so many - you might want to consider a Venn diagram, a word/idea web, a cause/effect chart, a flow-chart, a sequence chart; something you’ve used as a pre-write; (KWL is really common, so don’t use for this assignment please). Word Splash Activity - content vocabulary is placed on a board, chart, large paper in a random ‘splash’. Students are asked to use the words in sentences, a paragraph, captioned drawing, or diagram. Cloze Writing - fill in the blank using a vocabulary bank Line Continuum - usually used with 5-10 agree/disagree or true/false statements about the upcoming topic/unit; students place themselves on a continuum line about what level of comfort they may have with answering the question; for each question there usually is new movement. Graffiti Wall - Use large butcher paper and title it with a theme or big idea or topic from unit (i.e. Underground Railroad) Students over a certain amount of time (a day-a week) write thoughts/ideas/opinions that come to mind regarding the title. Have them initial each. Keep track of what students record. The graffiti wall then can be used throughout the unit by adding new information, correcting misconceptions, categorizing, developing vocabulary, etc. for you to listen to later.

14 Science Sequence/steps/cycles/processes Scientific principles Content-area vocabulary Math Steps in a process Social Studies Important events/turning points/conflicts Elements of civilization Highlights of an era Content-area vocabulary ELA Character/key figures/attributes Setting/conflict/problems & solutions Beginning, middle, end Symbols/themes

15 Types of informal pre-assessments Quick Write - might sound very ordinary, but as a pre-assessment it can reveal a lot by asking a ‘big idea’ question; student answers can uncover what they understand, what misconceptions they may have, or the reasoning processes they are using. They are given only 1-3 minutes to write an answer (thus 'quick write') Example: "How do electrical devices work?" Graphic Organizer - there are so many - you might want to consider a Venn diagram, a word/idea web, a cause/effect chart, a flow-chart, a sequence chart; something you’ve used as a pre-write; (KWL is really common, so don’t use for this assessment please). Word Splash Activity - content vocabulary is placed on a board, chart, large paper in a random ‘splash’. Students are asked to use the words in sentences, a paragraph, captioned drawing, or diagram. Cloze Writing - fill in the blank using a vocabulary bank Line Continuum - usually used with 5-10 agree/disagree or true/false statements about the upcoming topic/unit; students place themselves on a continuum line about what level of comfort they may have with answering the question; for each question there usually is new movement. Graffiti Wall - Use large butcher paper and title it with a theme or big idea or topic from unit (i.e. Underground Railroad) Students over a certain amount of time (a day-a week) write thoughts/ideas/opinions that come to mind regarding the title. Have them initial each. Keep track of what students record. The graffiti wall then can be used throughout the unit by adding new information, correcting misconceptions, categorizing, developing vocabulary, etc. for you to listen to later.

16

17 Types of informal pre-assessments Quick Write - might sound very ordinary, but as a pre-assessment it can reveal a lot by asking a ‘big idea’ question; student answers can uncover what they understand, what misconceptions they may have, or the reasoning processes they are using. They are given only 1-3 minutes to write an answer (thus 'quick write') Example: "How do electrical devices work?" Graphic Organizer - there are so many - you might want to consider a Venn diagram, a word/idea web, a cause/effect chart, a flow-chart, a sequence chart; something you’ve used as a pre-write; (KWL is really common, so don’t use for this assignment please). Word Splash Activity - content vocabulary is placed on a board, chart, large paper in a random ‘splash’. Students are asked to use the words in sentences, a paragraph, captioned drawing, or diagram. Cloze Writing - fill in the blank using a vocabulary bank Line Continuum - usually used with 5-10 agree/disagree or true/false statements about the upcoming topic/unit; students place themselves on a continuum line about what level of comfort they may have with answering the question; for each question there usually is new movement. Graffiti Wall - Use large butcher paper and title it with a theme or big idea or topic from unit (i.e. Underground Railroad) Students over a certain amount of time (a day-a week) write thoughts/ideas/opinions that come to mind regarding the title. Have them initial each. Keep track of what students record. The graffiti wall then can be used throughout the unit by adding new information, correcting misconceptions, categorizing, developing vocabulary, etc. for you to listen to later.

18

19 Other types of pre-assessments Yes/No Cards - Students make a large index card with Yes (or "Got It") on one side, No ("No clue") on the other side. Teachers ask an introductory or review question. Students who know the answer hold up the Yes card, if they might have the answer they hold the No card. Then do a quick Think/Pair/Share. This short assessment can give a quick look at what the group is ready for/understands/'gets'. Example: Use when introducing vocabulary words that students need as a knowledge base for a specific unit of study. Entrance Cards- As students enter for the day give them a small index card and ask them to respond to a displayed sentence or short paragraph which shares a specific idea that will be taught during the unit displayed in the room. They might ask questions or add more information to the displayed statement. Square Off/or 4 Corners - Place a card in each corner of the room labeled as: No Path, Rocky Path, Smooth Path, and Paved Path. Teach them the meaning of the analogy of "path" in their learning. Make a statement or ask a question about the topic/unit of study (i.e. "The moon has no gravity.") Instruct the students to go to the corner of the room that matches their comfort level with what they are thinking or where they are with the statement. As a group, those in each corner discuss what they know about the statement/question. Briefly visit each corner to listen to their conversations or they can record the conversations onto an audio tape

20 iPad Pre-assessment Apps Traffic Light Screen Chomp Show Me

21 Other technology tools for Pre-assessments Socrative Room 7615 Poll Anywhere

22

23 # Curriculum Compacting A three-step process that: a) assesses what a student knows about material to be studied, b) plans for learning what is not known, c) plans for freed-up time to be spent in enriched or accelerated study.

24

25

26 # Learning Contracts Written agreements between students and teachers that grant the student certain freedoms/choices about completing tasks yet require the student to meet certain specifications. They outline what the students will learn, how they will learn it, how long they will have to learn it, and how they will be graded or evaluated. Often times contain “working conditions” or rules to be followed.

27 Learning Contract #2 To demonstrate what I have learned about ____________________, I want to _ Write a report _ Put on a demonstration _ Set up an experiment _ Develop a computer presentation _ Build a model _ Design a mural _ Write a song _ Make a movie (Podcast) _ Create a graphic organizer or diagram _ Other This will be a good way to demonstrate understanding of this concept because ______________________________________________________________ To do this project, I will need help with ______________________________________________________________ My Action Plan is________________________________________________ The criteria/rubric which will be used to assess my final product is _________ ______________________________________________________________ My project will be completed by this date _____________________________ Student signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__ Teacher signature: ________________________________ Date __/__/__

28

29

30

31

32

33

34

35 # Most Difficult First Used for skill-based subjects (like math); If student shows mastery, move on to independent work; Give credit for the assignment

36

37 # Flexible Grouping Based on: Readiness Interest Learning Profile

38 Grouping Methods TAPS Teacher Assigned Student Selected Random

39

40 # Questioning Rigor and Relevance Plan ahead

41

42

43

44 # Open Ended Tasks Require more than remembering a fact or reproducing a skill, Students can learn from answering the questions; teachers can learn about the students, May be several acceptable answers.

45 Project Based Learning (PBL) The Buck Institute for Education West Virginia Department of Education

46 From “Google-able” to open-ended: What were the major developments in the Renaissance? Was the Renaissance a rebirth, or a whole new baby?

47 From “too big” to answerable: How have humans changed the environment? How has our (state, city, etc.) changed in the past 50 years?

48 From too general to more concrete and challenging: How do architects use geometry? How can we design a theatre that meets specifications with the greatest number of seats?

49 From too abstract to more relevant and engaging: What is a hero? Who are the heroes in my life?

50 From too general to more concrete and localized: What are the characteristics of healthy soil? Is our soil healthy enough to support a vegetable garden?

51 From “sounds like a teacher” to student-friendly: How does the author use voice and perspective in The House on Mango Street to reflect on her childhood and community? How does our childhood shape who we are as teenagers?

52 Partner Sharing Time

53

54 # Tiering Based on readiness level -Different work, not simply more or less work -Equally active -Equally interesting and engaging -Fair in terms of work expectations and time needed -Require the use of key concepts, skills, or ideas -Are used as practice or formative work, NOT as an assessment task to be graded. -Learn from each other – share work!

55 Motivation to Learn Students cannot learn when they are unmotivated by things far too difficult or things far too easy. Students learn more enthusiastically when they are motivated by those things that connect to their interests. --Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom GaDOE

56 THINKDOTS OR CUBING

57

58

59

60

61

62 # Choice Boards Help to manage a differentiated classroom Independent work Used to extend and refine learning targets

63 Motivation to Learn Students cannot learn when they are unmotivated by things far too difficult or things far too easy. Students learn more enthusiastically when they are motivated by those things that connect to their interests. --Tomlinson, The Differentiated Classroom GaDOE

64 TIC TAC TOE BOARDS

65 One way to design a TTT board in a “universal design” manner BCB CCC BCB

66 Learning Targets – Industrialization and Urbanization The learning targets for this assignment: Students will be able to… Identify individuals who played a major role in expanding industry. Identify individuals who responded to the growth of industry through the organization of workers. Identify the reasons why the United States was able to turn into a major industrial power during this era. Identify the reasons why there was a growth in labor unions during this time period. Identify historical themes that are found throughout a historical era. Identify the cause and effect relationship of historical events.

67 (1) News Story You are a journalist during the Gilded Age and have been asked by your boss to write a front-page article about either the booming steel industry in Pittsburg, PA or the growth of oil. You must interview Andrew Carnegie or John D. Rockefeller, as well as a steel mill worker or oil refinery work. Other than these requirements, you are free to write what you want! (2) Obituary A well-known industrial baron or union leader has passed away. Choose which figure you want to write an obituary about from the list below. Be sure to cover the impact that individual had on society, as well as his/her accomplishments and failures. -A. Carnegie -J. Rockefeller -C. Vanderbilt. -E. Debs -S. Gompers -T. Powderly (3) Cause and Effect Chart Create a cause and effect chart for two of the following events. Be sure to identify and explain each of your chosen events, and then identify and explain 3 impacts. -Completion of the Transcontinental Railroad -Bessemer Process -Electricity -Big Business (4) Primary Source Analyzer Find a primary source that dates to the Gilded Age, specifically the growth of big business, and complete the APART handout. Be sure to answer each part of the acronym. (5) Recruiter Advertisement Henry Fisk of Carnegie Steel. Co. has hired you to create an advertisement flyer to recruit new employees for the steel mill in Homestead, PA. He fears that a strike may be coming and wants to be able to recruit new employees if the current ones stop working. (6) Poem/Rap/Song Write a poem/rap/song about the Gilded Age. It can be general about the era, or you can select a specific part of the era. Either way, it must be 5-6 stanzas in length, with each stanza have 4-5 lines of more than 8 words. (7) One Pager Complete a one-pager documenting one of the historical themes (BAGPIPE) from US History seen in the Gilded Age. Find the one-pager instructions for more information, or see me for an example. (8) Timeline Create a timeline on either a poster-board or on the website Select what you believe to be the TOP 10 events of the Gilded Age. For each, provide a description and then explain why you chose it as a top 10 event from the era. (9) Schematic Drawing/Model You are an architect and your firm has just been hired to develop a new factory town outside of Chicago. A rival firm just complete George Pullman’s complex, and the people who hired you want a similar design. Create either a detail schematic drawing, or a 3 dimensional model of what your factory will look like and include. INDUSTRIALIZATION AND URBANIZATION TIC-TAC-TOE CHOICE BOARD

68 Rhyme Time (musical) Make a rhyme or chant to help you and others remember the formula to the Pythagorean Theorem. Write it down. Think-Aloud (verbal/linguistic & logical/mathematical) Create three story problems involving the Pythagorean Theorem. As you write and solve each problem, write a think-aloud, including your reasons as to why you chose the problems and numbers that you chose. Poster (visual/spatial & logical/mathematical) Create a poster for the class that shows examples of how to solve for the missing side of a right triangle by using the Pythagorean Theorem. You may take pictures, draw pictures, or use the internet. Game Time (interpersonal) With a partner, create a game about the Pythagorean Theorem. Agree on and write down directions so that you can explain the game to the class. Review Time Free Space You will find a creative way to review for the test. Make sure your review includes at least two items from each section that we’ve covered in our unit. Photo Book (naturalist & visual/spatial) Take photos of right triangles at home or around the classroom. Put the photos together to create a book about the Pythagorean Theorem. Then identify the legs, hypotenuse, and the right angle on the triangles. Family Time (interpersonal & visual/spatial & verbal/linguistic) Interview a family member or friend to see if they know how they use the Pythagorean Theorem. If he/she does not know how to use the Pythagorean Theorem, teach it to him/her on a piece of paper. If he/she does know the Pythagorean Theorem, have him/her teach it to you on a piece of paper. Formula Diagram (logical/mathematical & visual/spatial) Draw a diagram to support the formula of the Pythagorean Theorem: the sum of the area of the two squares on the legs of a right triangle equals the area of the square of the hypotenuse. Dance Time (body/kinesthetic & musical) Make up a rap or a dance that explains the Pythagorean Theorem. Write it down and be prepared to teach the class. Tic Tac Toe Board: The Pythagorean Theorem

69 1. Letter Home You are a “launchie” Write a letter to a family member back on earth. Explain what your new life is like in battle school by describing two activities the cadets do for training. Also, write about an encounter you had with one of the characters in the book; Ender, Petra, Bean, Bonzo, etc. This should give insight into their personality. 2.In The News Pretend you are a writer for the “Vids.” Write a half page news report praising or condemning Ender’s zenocide. This news report should give reasons why the world should treat Ender like a savior or a mass murderer. 3.Locke/Demosthenes Research Jump on a computer and research who Locke and Demosthenes were in real life. Create some kind of report (power point, poster, short paper, etc.) explaining who they were and why their names were chosen by Peter. 4.Design a Battle Arena Sketch out a battle arena “star” plan. After sketching, write a brief explanation why the stars were placed where you placed them. What sort of strategy do you hope the cadets will come up with in your arena (best way to win). 5.Continue the Series Choose to follow either Ender with Ender in Flight or Speaker of the Dead, Bean with Ender’s Shadow or back track to a young Mazer Rackham with Earth Unaware by reading the first chapter in any of those books. Write a brief response describing how it connects with an event in Ender’s Game. 6. Poster It is your chance to make a cheat sheet for your classroom! Design and make a poster that includes the important plot points, characters, and concepts from Ender’s Game. If all of your information is accurate and professional looking I may or may not allow this up as a cheat sheet! (I suggest a divide and conquer approach. Find what other classmates are doing and choose something different…maybe all of the test info will be on the walls!) 7.You tell me Free box, if you can think of anything else, run it past me with point values and we will try to make it happen 8.Comic Strip Create a comic strip that illustrates your favorite scene in Ender’s Game. Be sure to use illustrations and captions 9.Movie Night Watch the movie Ender’s Game. Complete a Venn Diagram that illustrates the similarities (5) and differences (10) between the book and movie. Write 1 paragraph explaining which you like better. Novel Study: Ender’s Game

70 LEARNING MENUS

71 The Pythagorean Theorem Choice Menu Main Dish (complete all): Create and write down a real-world two-dimensional problem to solve by using the Pythagorean Theorem. Make sure to create an answer key and show your work on how to solve it. Then have a friend solve it. Create and write down a real-world three-dimensional problem to solve by using the Pythagorean Theorem. Make sure to create an answer key and show your work on how to solve it. Then have a friend solve it. Side Dish (choose two): Create a rap or song about the Pythagorean Theorem. Please try to incorporate as many of the eight vocabulary words as possible (Pythagorean Theorem, Pythagorean Theorem Converse, proof, right angle, right triangle, square root, hypotenuse, and legs). Create a game to remember and practice the spelling of the eight vocabulary words (Pythagorean Theorem, Pythagorean Theorem Converse, proof, right angle, right triangle, square root, hypotenuse, and legs). Write instructions so other classmates can play it. Use a large piece of paper to write the letters pythagorean theorem. Use these letters to create new words by rearranging the letters. You do not need to use all of the letters. For example, the word “got” and “python” could be two possible words. See how many words you can make. Challenge your friends. Dessert (optional and can only be completed after the other two courses): Use the puzzlemaker.com website to create a crossword puzzle for the eight vocabulary words (Pythagorean Theorem, Pythagorean Theorem Converse, proof, right angle, right triangle, square root, hypotenuse, and legs). Then you or a friend can solve it. Use the computer to create a brochure using Publisher or create a PowerPoint presentation. You should explain the steps on how to solve for a missing side of a right triangle by using the Pythagorean Theorem.

72 Pizza Builder Choice Board Orchestra Task: Build a ‘Pizza’ that represents a genre or style of music that is interesting to you

73 Pizza Builder!! Crust Choices: (Select one) Thin Crust: A solo work for an unaccompanied instrument or voice Hand Tossed Crust: A work for a chamber ensemble of 2-15 performers Deep Dish Crust: A work for large ensemble, over 16 performers Gluten Free Crust: A work for mechanical or computer based sound generators

74 Pizza Builder! Sauce Choices: (Select one) Red Sauce: represents music created for no specific occasion but simply as entertainment. White Sauce: represents uplifting music created for a specific purpose or cultural event. Pesto Sauce: represents somber music created for a specific purpose or cultural event. Barbeque Sauce: represents music created for a festive occasion or cultural event.

75 Pizza Builder! Toppings: (Select your favorite!) The Middle Ages: A delicious pizza topped with the sounds of singing Monks, recorders, shawms, and citterns. Note: peasants will be served on traditional wooden utensils; nobles will be served on gold plates. The Renaissance: A very festive pizza topped with the sounds of crumhorns, hurdy-gurdies, lutes, and essence of sackbut. Note: some toppings have been aged to preserve their potency.

76 Pizza Builder! Toppings – Con’t: (Select your favorite!) The Baroque: More refined than the Renaissance, this pizza includes the sounds of the viol family and the harpsichord. Depending on your sauce, you may detect a note of certain brass instruments. Note: This pizza served by a celebrity impersonator dressed as J. S. Bach The Classical: Very formal in design, this square pizza features the sounds of strings and woodwinds with percussion and occasional brass instruments. You must wear a powdered wig when ordering this pizza.

77 Pizza Builder! Toppings – Con’t: (Select your favorite!) The Romantic: A house favorite, this super-sized pizza features your traditional orchestral instrument family – but in twice the proportion. Earplugs recommended. The Modern: an unusual pizza, this pie pushes forms and shapes to an extreme. Order it with any combination of toppings. Note: crust will be asymmetrical. The Jazz: you may order the ‘big band’ or ‘combo’ version of this pizza. Each features excellent rhythm and improvised solos. Note: this pizza may not be available if the chef is between sets.

78 Pizza Builder! Bake and Deliver Your Pizza: You may use the media center as your information ‘Oven’. Use the media sources available to you to find a piece of music that represents the pizza you have created. You will be preparing your pizza for consumption by the class. When you ‘Serve’ your pizza, be prepared to play either an audio or video with audio clip of the music.

79 Pizza Builder! Assessment Rubric: Meets or exceeds expectations: Crust, sauce, and toppings well thought out to produce a representative piece of music with an example that includes the ingredients. Pizza well baked and arrives hot! Some expectations met: Crust, sauce, and toppings do not combine in a completely logical way – representative music difficult to categorize, and ingredients not well represented. Pizza may have been baked for too short a time. Expectations not met: Pizza was missing a major ingredient, or was not baked sufficiently.

80 RAFTS

81 ROLEAUDIENCEFORMATTOPIC News ReporterTV AudienceScript Give the audience directions on how to find the distance between two points in a coordinate system. Newspaper WriterNewspaper ReaderAdvice Column Explain the proof of the Pythagorean Theorem. Then explain the proof of the converse of the Pythagorean Theorem. Yourself Absent Friend In Class Instructions Explain how to create a right triangle on a coordinate grid given two points. TeacherStudentInstructionsExplain how to solve a real-world mathematical problem using the Pythagorean Theorem to find the missing side in a right triangle in three-dimensions. RAFT Writing Pythagorean Theorem

82 R OLE A UDIENCE F ORMAT T OPIC Robber Baron Your business’ shareholders Report You are the head of a major industry and need to keep your shareholders happy by explaining to them how you are going to continue to make money. You need to outline your plan to them. Member of Congress Other members of Congress Legislation You and many of your colleagues are shareholders of several big companies making large profits. You want to make sure this continues. Draft a bill that will guarantee support for big business. Immigrant Worker Family in Homeland Letter Explain what your life in America is like to your loved ones back home. Focus on your job and opportunities for work. Populist Reformer Immigrants Invitation You are beginning to see how immigrants are being taken advantage of in the work place as a source of cheap labor. You want to learn more about their situation in the factories. Invite them to a dinner to discuss their status as laborers Inventor Your employees Inspirational Speech There is quick money to be made with every new invention that is created. Inspire your company workers to invent the next big one! INDUSTRIALIZATION ERA RAFT

83 RoleAudienceFormatTopic PaintbrushPeersCartoonThe World is full of Color. Emotional ColorsElementary Students Children’s Book Cover Weather. Warm or cool colors The PublicWarning AdWarning! Don’t………. Analogous Color Scheme Dole & GabbanaPaper People Wardrobe What to wear for the new fall design. Role – What is your role as the artist? Audience – Who will be looking at your art? Format – What is the best way to present your art? Topic – Who or what is the subject of the artwork? Directions: Choose a role. Consider the audience. Complete the assignment in your sketchbook using the format and topic for that role. You may use colored pencil for this project. Use the checklist on the next page to make sure you are doing your best work.

84 Spanish: RAFT TARGET: I can use Spanish words and sentences to tell where things are located in the classroom.

85

86 TRI-MIND OR TRIARCHIC

87 Linear – Schoolhouse Smart - Sequential ANALYTICAL Thinking About the Sternberg Intelligences Show the parts of _________ and how they work. Explain why _______ works the way it does. Diagram how __________ affects __________________. Identify the key parts of _____________________. Present a step-by-step approach to _________________. Streetsmart – Contextual – Focus on Use PRACTICAL Demonstrate how someone uses ________ in their life or work. Show how we could apply _____ to solve this real life problem ____. Based on your own experience, explain how _____ can be used. Here’s a problem at school, ________. Using your knowledge of ______________, develop a plan to address the problem. CREATIVEInnovator – Outside the Box – What If - Improver Find a new way to show _____________. Use unusual materials to explain ________________. Use humor to show ____________________. Explain (show) a new and better way to ____________. Make connections between _____ and _____ to help us understand ____________. Become a ____ and use your “new” perspectives to help us think about ____________.

88 Art and Color (Triarchic Intelligences) Target: I can analyze the use of color in painting.

89 Analytical After you have looked at Monet’s Paintings 6.24 and 6.25 in your book. Select one painting and write a paragraph describing and analyzing it’s tone. Tone is associated with the feeling that Monet has about the scene, how he conveys the feeling to the viewer, and how he encourages the viewer to respond with emotions to the scene, First make a list of adjectives for the colors and forms in the painting. Then begin a paragraph using your list of words and make specific references to the painting. Practical Make a painting or a collage that focuses on major events in your life. Use color to indicate the emotional connection you have with the specific event. Creative Poets use color in their poetry, sometimes to describe objects but also as metaphors of feelings, moods, or scenes. Look in Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations for literary references to each color. You will find under red, a reference to Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Ode to the West Wind.” Find a copy of the poem and locate his description of autumn leaves. Write your own color metaphors.

90 Physical Education (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can communicate, cooperate, be a member of a team and enjoy participating in physical activity.

91 Analytical Analyze the task you have ahead of you. What will you need to succeed? What obstacles are you likely to encounter? What is the best way to go about this task so that everyone participates/everyone exploits his or her strengths/you meet the lesson goals. Complete the task. Critique your performance – focus on team performance rather than individual. Compare this activity to other team endeavors. What this task a good way to learn about teamwork? Why or why not? Practical Perform this task in a way which takes the: least physical effort; moderate physical effort; highest level of physical effort; relies on each member equally; relies on each member’s special strengths; uses the least/most equipment, expenses, etc. Discuss: When might you need to use each approach? What are the +/- of each? How can this exercise help you in real life? Creative Complete the task to the best of your ability. Change the rules and try it again; repeat (make sure the task stays safe!). Design another such task that encourages cooperation and communication in a different way – perhaps nonverbal communication. What if you didn’t have the equipment you were given? How could you accomplish the task? What equipment is necessary? Nice to have? Unnecessary?

92 Immigration (Triarchic Intelligences) TARGET: I can explain the meaning of “melting pot,” “mosaic,” and “salad bowl” as they relate to immigration in America.

93 Analytic Analyze how and why the U.S. population has shifted from a melting pot to a salad bowl or mosaic as it has assimilated new immigrants. Show your analysis in a diagram. Practical Think of the population of Grand Rapids and Kent County. Is it better for Grand Rapids to assimilate new people to this area like a melting pot or a salad bowl? Defend your position in a Podcast. Creative Create a different pair of metaphors to characterize how immigrants assimilated in the past and how they assimilate today. Write an explanation for each or create a visual to depict them.

94 SHOW AND TELL

95 Show-And-Tell Boards All students have the same TASK, but have a choice of SHOW AND TELL. Top row – what they could show Bottom row – what they could tell Need 1 SHOW & 1 TELL

96 SHOWCharts and graphs Timeline of incidents related to the event Illustrations, photographs, graphics, or artifacts TELLNewspaper article Video news interview Speech TARGET: I can describe events that occurred during the civil rights movement TASK: Describe a significant event that occurred during the civil rights movement.

97

98 THE “PROFILER”

99 What is your preferred Learning Profile? Write Draw Act Sing Build

100

101

102

103

104

105 Learning PreferenceTasks ArtistCreate a poster that could be placed on the door of the union office at your job site. The goal of the poster is to communicate what workers want—higher pay and better conditions at the job site. The poster must be on an 11X14 piece of paper. See me once you complete a rough draft. BuilderYou have been asked by the union leader to build a model replica of your work site and to use it in a presentation at the next community meeting. The goal is to show others in the community what life in your work site is like, and to rally public support for the union. Draw out what your model will look like, and then it’ll have to be completed at home. Tour GuideA member of Congress is coming to your work site to examine the conditions. You have been selected to give the member of Congress a tour. Put together a tour itinerary of the places you want to show him (for this choice, assume you are working in a steel mill, dealing with hot molten iron-ore and other equipment). Make it your goal that this member of Congress goes back to Washington DC to fight for new legislation to help workers! MusicianLife in the factory can get pretty boring, and one of the things workers do to pass time is sing. Write a catchy song that you and your co-workers can sing that describes your working conditions and what improves you want as a laborer. WriterYou have been contacted by a local newspaper and been asked to write a opinion piece in the Sunday paper about working conditions at your job site. Write a work article about the conditions and what improvements you want to see. Response to Big Business – Rise of Labor Unions

106 Artist Draw a picture that explains the relationship of the areas of the squares on the sides of a right triangle for the Pythagorean Theorem. Announcer Announce the words and definitions of the Pythagorean Theorem, right triangle, right angle, legs a & b, hypotenuse, square root, proof, and the Pythagorean Theorem Converse like if you were announcing players at a professional basketball game. Write down what you would say. Writer Write out the proof of the Pythagorean Theorem and the Pythagorean Theorem Converse. Then write down similarities and differences between the two proofs. Actor Act out what a right triangle is composed of and then create a rap about the Pythagorean Theorem. The Pythagorean Theorem: Profiler

107 RoleLevel 1: On or Below Grade LevelLevel 2: On or Above Grade Level Artist Draw or design an advertisement with descriptions of various clothing items, include the opinions of fashion experts. Draw or design an advertisement with descriptions of various clothing items, include opinions from fashion experts. Make up a new clothing item that is not invented yet. Singer/ Songwriter Write and perform a song or poem describing modern day clothing which includes public opinion of the clothing. Write and perform a song describing modern day clothing which includes public opinion of the clothing. Include a comparison to clothing worn when you were younger. Online Ad Writer Write an “online” advertisement for clothes with descriptions and customer reviews. Write an “online” advertisement for clothes with descriptions and customer reviews. Include a respectful comparison to clothing from other stores. Actor Act out a fashion show which includes a complete description of the models’ clothing and critiques from journalists. Act out a fashion show which includes a complete description of the models’ clothing and critiques from journalists. Include a comparison of the models’ clothing to the previous model.

108

109

110

111

112

113 # Independent Projects Ultimate in autonomous learning; Huge student buy in; Even the unexpected will help you and the student learn something; Fun and Learning!! Nothing beats that!

114 Genius HourHour

115 Daretodifferentiate

116 As a team of educators: Discuss with your peers the differentiated instructional ideas and strategies that you recommend for implementation in your unit.


Download ppt "TOP 10 STRATEGIES TO DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION Jacque Melin"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google