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Presentation Pointers: Oral and Poster Presentation Success Dr. Thomas Tomasi, Associate Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Biology.

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation Pointers: Oral and Poster Presentation Success Dr. Thomas Tomasi, Associate Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Biology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation Pointers: Oral and Poster Presentation Success Dr. Thomas Tomasi, Associate Dean of the Graduate College and Professor of Biology

2 Presentation Outline 1.Slide Preparation 2.Oral Presentations 3.Poster Presentations 4.Final Comments 5.Questions

3 Slide Preparation

4 Number of Slides 1 slide/minute (12 for IDF) Decide how many slides for each portion of the presentation Introduction –Provide background to match audience Methods –Overview of project –Detail of methodology to match audience Results & Discussion –Tables and graphs w/ statistical findings (if applicable) –Brief discussion of significance of each finding Conclusions (bullet take-home messages) References (optional) Acknowledgements (optional)

5 Arrangement of Slides Dimensions –Landscape Fill space evenly Avoid large tracks of white space X X

6 Slide Formatting 6x6x6 Rule (or 5x5x5 Rule) –6 words per bullet point –6 bullet points per slide –6 word-slides in a row Separate lines with white space –Single space is not enough Use animation to focus the audience –Too much or too fancy is distracting Background, slide layout, slide design –“KISS” principle

7 Slide Formatting - Backgrounds Your background must complement your presentation purpose You should select a background that makes it easy to read your text and graphics Dark slides project poorly in large rooms See examples – what do you think? Light-on-dark

8 Slide Formatting Your background must complement your presentation purpose You should select a background that makes it easy to read your text and graphics Dark slides project poorly in large rooms Light-on-dark

9 Slide Formatting Your background must complement your presentation purpose You should select a background that makes it easy to read your text and graphics Dark slides project poorly in large rooms Light-on-dark

10 Slide Formatting Your background must complement your presentation purpose You should select a background that makes it easy to read your text and graphics Dark slides project poorly in large rooms Light-on-dark

11 Font Formatting No smaller than 24 point font size ( this size ) Font style should be consistent throughout, except for emphasis –Some fonts are more difficult to read Use lower case for best legibility –Short headlines may be in all CAPS Use different font colors for emphasis But whatever you do, Be Consistent!

12 Data Presentation Decide on table or graph Determine the type of graph –Bar graphs, line graphs, pie charts Use larger font than normal text Include statistics Include captions for poster, but NOT slides

13 Tables vs. Graphs Oral Poster

14 Number of Cells in a Table RECEIVEDPRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORCOLDEPARTMENTBEGIN DATEEND DATE 07/03/97McClennen, JoanCHHSSWK05/31/9705/31/98 07/03/97McClennen, JoanCHHSSWK05/31/9705/31/98 07/08/97Rippee, Billy D.COEDGAC06/19/9707/18/97 07/08/97Rippee, Billy D.COEDGAC06/10/9707/10/97 07/08/97Rippee, Billy D.COEDGAC06/10/9707/10/97 07/08/97Rippee, Billy D.COEDGAC08/08/9608/08/97 07/10/97Garrison-Harrell, LindaCOEDRSE09/08/9712/12/97 07/10/97Masterson, Julie J.CHHSCSD07/01/9706/30/98 07/10/97Park-Fuller, Linda & Rich, MarcCOALT&D05/05/9705/09/97 07/10/97Walker, NancyCOALENG08/25/9712/11/97 07/16/97Aripoli, DonSTUAFF 07/15/9712/15/97 07/17/97Stierwalt, Julie A. G.CHHSCSD08/01/9705/31/98 07/28/97Masterson, Julie J.CHHSCSD07/01/9706/30/98 08/05/97Yost, LindaCOALENG01/03/9712/01/97 08/11/97Netsell, RonaldCHHSCSD09/02/9704/02/98 08/12/97Kirker, MarthaACAD.AF.CTR.ASSESS.08/15/9710/10/97 08/12/97Kirker, MarthaACAD.AF.CTR.ASSESS.07/29/9707/29/98 08/12/97Stierwalt, Julie A. G.CHHSCSD08/01/9705/31/98 08/18/97Bushman, BarbaraCHHSHPER09/01/9701/31/98

15 Oral Presentations

16 Presentation Styles Prior to the presentation, determine any acoustic or visual issues with the room Relax and be yourself –No one knows it better than you do –You are having a conversation with the audience Use your slides as a guide Look at the audience, not the slides Point to what you are emphasizing Avoid distracting actions, sounds Pauses are OK Enthusiasm is great!

17 “Reading Your Paper” Even though this is considered “normal” in some disciplines, do NOT do it Include something visual, even if just clip art and some bullet points Use note cards if you need help remembering what you want to say #6 Key terms to define Key points to make Segue to next slide 6:30

18 Practice, Practice, Practice Make your presentation at least 1 week before the scheduled date and practice it! Practice when you have time to edit –Speak loudly, with good enunciation –Use appropriate hand gestures –Use screen and pointer –Time yourself –Use animation Pay attention to slide transitions Make the presentation clear, concise, and colorful (language choices) Move with purpose around the room

19 Professional Appearance Business attire –Men: Dress shirt, dress slacks, possibly coat & tie –Women: Conservative suit or dress with blazer Appropriate dress shoes –Men: Dress shoes and socks – no white socks –Women: Closed-toed shoes; low heels Avoid jeans, t-shirts, sneakers, sweatpants – no gum! Grooming to match the occasion –Brushed hair and teeth –Appropriate make-up (if applicable) –Limited jewelry

20 Poster Presentations

21 Poster Construction Determine size of display board surface –4 feet high by 6 feet wide for IDF Determine poster construction materials –Paper –Mount paper/photos on poster board (THIN) –Scroll (PowerPoint with large printer) Other items: –Bring push pins –Handouts (if needed for exchange) –Always “carry-on” (if flying)

22 Items to Include Title –Including title, author(s) and institution –Lettering 1-2” tall Abstract (optional if otherwise available) –Should appear in upper left-hand corner Introduction –Briefly summarize background –Identify the purpose –Identify the question(s) or hypothesis(es)

23 Items to Include (con’t) Experimental Design/Methods –Need sufficient detail –Include number and demographic of subjects Results/Discussion –Table, figure, illustration, and/or photograph –Should stand on its own –Interpretative legend Highlight and BRIEFLY discuss essential points

24 Summary/Conclusions –Briefly state the “bottom line(s)” Acknowledgement (if space allows) –Funding source(s) –Institutional support –Other contributors Other (if space allows) –References –Pictures Items to Include (con’t)

25 Poster Layout Title and authors at the top “Panels” = slides of oral presentation –Text, tables, figures, photos –Minimal use of sentences and paragraphs –Arranged vertically –4 columns and 3 rows = 12 panels Entertainment value Examples – what do you think?

26 Pesticide Effects on Endocrine Function in Hibernating 13-lined Ground Squirrels Jean A. Perry, Thomas E. Tomasi, & Kerry Withers. Department of Biology, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield Missouri (JAP & TET), and Department of Biological & Physical Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia (KW) METHODS Forty one wild-caught 13-lined ground squirrels were chronically treated with non-lethal doses of two lipophilic pesticides (atrazine & lindane) prior to hibernation. Treatments (n=7-8) consisted of a high lindane group (0.98g lindane/280mLdistilled water on 1960g pellets), a low lindane group (0.098g lindane/280mL water on 1960g of pellets), an atrazine group (11.51g atrazine /280mL water on 1960g pellets), a mixture of low-dose lindane /atrazine group (in 280 mL water on 1960g pellets), and a control group with 280g water on 1960g pellets). All solutions were sprayed onto the squirrel food, which was spread in a monolayer and allowed to dry. Animals hibernated individually in rodent cages that were kept in environmental chambers. Serum samples were collected from all animals prior to hibernation (Oct.), twice during hibernation (Nov. & Jan.), and post- hibernation (Apr.). The first three samples were used to measure thyroid hormone concentrations (total & free T4, and total & free T3), and the last to measure reproductive hormones (testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone) via RIA. RESULTS Although all thyroid hormones changed over time, only total & free T3 were affected by pesticide treatment. There was no treatment effect on any of the reproductive hormones, although testosterone was higher in males than females. Estrogen and progesterone did not differ between genders, suggesting that blood was not taken during estrus. These pesticide treatments did not apparently impair thyroid or reproductive endocrinology INTRODUCTION Endocrine disruptors, a class of environmental pollutants which have been shown to interfere with normal hormone function, pose an increasing threat to the world’s fauna. Several of these substances accumulate in body fat (which in hibernators increases dramatically during the pre-hibernation period) and have been shown compromise normal thyroid function. Endocrine disruptors may mimic or inhibit natural hormones responsible for homeostasis, development and reproduction. Therefore it was hypothesized that these pesticides might disrupt normal reproductive function upon emergence from hibernation.

27 Miranda B. Milam, Brad M. Mormann, Lynn W. Robbins, and Thomas E. Tomasi Biology Department Southwest Missouri State University Individuals were kept in separate enclosures within an environmental chamber. THERMOREGULATION AND AROUSAL PATTERNS OF EASTERN RED BATS (Lasiurus borealis) ABSTRACT J.G. Boyles Figure 1: A stylized graph comparing changes in metabolism of euthermic and hibernating animals. Figure 2: A stylized graph demonstrating arousal patterns. Frequency of arousals is dependent on ambient temperature. INTRODUCTION Cryptic coloration provides excellent camouflage when hibernating on the forest floor.

28 Final Comments

29 Effective communication is the goal Carefully proofread all materials Use special effects sparingly to draw attention, not just because you can GOOD LUCK QUESTIONS


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