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HOW TO WRITE THE AP EUROPEAN DBQ. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DBQ  The DBQ counts as 22.5% (45% of Part II) of the total score so it can play a huge role in.

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Presentation on theme: "HOW TO WRITE THE AP EUROPEAN DBQ. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DBQ  The DBQ counts as 22.5% (45% of Part II) of the total score so it can play a huge role in."— Presentation transcript:

1 HOW TO WRITE THE AP EUROPEAN DBQ

2 THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DBQ  The DBQ counts as 22.5% (45% of Part II) of the total score so it can play a huge role in the AP Exam  It is important to know how the DBQ is scored, as well as how to write it in order to get the highest possible grade  Knowing how the DBQ is scored will help prepare students to write a better DBQ

3 THE BASIC CORE  Students must obtain points 1-6 to get “to the gate”  Possible to get Expanded Core points only IF students obtain all of the Basic Core points

4 THE BASIC CORE  Point 1 - Explicit thesis that directly addresses the question  Point 1 - Explicit thesis that directly addresses the question  Thesis must be explicit, not implied, and must address all parts of the question

5 THE BASIC CORE  Point 2 - Discusses a majority of the documents individually and explicitly, must use something in the “box”  Students must use at least a majority, and this is usually a bare minimum

6 THE BASIC CORE  Point 3 - Demonstrates an understanding of the majority of the documents  May have no more than one major error in interpretation This major error usually involves misinterpreting the document to the extent that it is used in an incorrect grouping This major error usually involves misinterpreting the document to the extent that it is used in an incorrect grouping

7 THE BASIC CORE  Point 4 - Supports the thesis with appropriate interpretation of a majority of the documents  Students who miss Point 1, will automatically miss this point, as well

8 THE BASIC CORE  Point 5 - Analyzes “Point of View” or “Bias” in at least THREE documents  Tends to be the “Killer Point” for many students, since many simply have not been taught “Point of View”

9 THE BASIC CORE  Point 6 - Analyzes the documents by organizing them into at least THREE distinct groups  Some DBQs have ready-made groups; some make the students work harder; but, there are always at least three possible groups

10 THE EXPANDED CORE  Unlike the Basic Core, the Expanded Core can be viewed as somewhat subjective  Up to three points are given based on how well a student accomplishes the examples given for the Expanded Core

11 THE EXPANDED CORE  Seven possible ways for students to achieve Expanded Core points  Recommend students concentrate on these four: 1. Persuasive use of documents as evidence 1. Persuasive use of documents as evidence 2. Addressing all parts of the question thoroughly 2. Addressing all parts of the question thoroughly 3. Analyzing point of view or bias in at least four documents, and 3. Analyzing point of view or bias in at least four documents, and 4. Additional groupings or other forms of analysis 4. Additional groupings or other forms of analysis

12 The Expanded Core  Devote less time to these three: 5. Having a clear, analytical and comprehensive thesis - the thesis can be very “subjective” 5. Having a clear, analytical and comprehensive thesis - the thesis can be very “subjective” 6. Using all or almost all of the documents – majority 6. Using all or almost all of the documents – majority of students do use most documents 7. Bringing in “relevant” outside information - students are given historical background in the DBQ; often they use this background as outside information 7. Bringing in “relevant” outside information - students are given historical background in the DBQ; often they use this background as outside information

13 THE KEY TO SCORING WELL ON THE DBQ  The key to scoring well on the DBQ is how well a student can demonstrate “Bias” or “POV”  Students must demonstrate it at least three times to receive the “core” point  In addition, demonstrating Bias or Point of View shows the reader that the student is capable of writing an in-depth paper

14 WHAT IS BIAS OR POINT OF VIEW?  In the simplest of terms, Bias or Point of View is prejudice or influence  “Why” did the author say what he/she said?  “Why” includes the factors that might have influenced the author’s position  Keys to these factors can often be found in the documents

15 KEY FACTORS  Several factors influence the determination of Bias or Point of View Name, Position, Nationality, Description, Name, Position, Nationality, Description, Document Date, Document type Document Date, Document type Relating authorial point of view to author’s place in society Relating authorial point of view to author’s place in society Evaluating the reliablility of the source Evaluating the reliablility of the source Recognizing that different types of documents serve different purposes Recognizing that different types of documents serve different purposes  Like we noted, much of this information can be found “In the Box,” saving valuable time

16 FURTHER EXPLANATION  Students should question every document as they analyze each, looking for keys  Is it an “official” pronouncement, a newspaper article, or maybe a diary or private letter  Is the author a male, female, a government official, or a person from particular class  How might the position or place in society of the author influenced what was written, or said  Look for key words or phrases in the document that might help in determining “Point of View”  Sometimes “who” can be important in “why” a person said something

17 DEMONSTRATING POINT OF VIEW  Challenge: teaching students to insert Bias or Point of View in the DBQ  Method: students use several key words or phrases to demonstrate Bias or Point of View  Goal: students must demonstrate Bias or Point of View THREE times (AP Euro) in the DBQ to receive the “Core Point”  Bonus: students who get the hang of finding Bias or Point of View have an easier time getting “Expanded Core Credit”

18 SAMPLE AP DOCUMENT  Source: Peasant Parliament of Swabia to the Memingen Town Council, from Articles of the Peasants of Memmingen, March 3, 1525  Hitherto we have been held as your poor serfs, which is pitiable, given that Christ has purchased and redeemed us with his precious blood, just as he has the Emperor. But it is not our intention to reject all authority. We will be obedient to all authority appointed by God in all fair and reasonable matters, and we do not doubt that as Christian lords you will release us from serfdom.

19 KEYS TO FINDING POINT OF VIEW IN THIS DOCUMENT  Who, or what is the author- A Peasant “Parliament” made up of peasants who make demands  How reliable is the source- A petition “written” by peasants calling for a release from serfdom, led by…  What type of document is this-It is a petition, a public record, presented by a group of peasants  Interesting in the fact that not many peasants could read or write, also the fact that religion is used as basis to release serfs, as well as the fact they say that they will obey all authority “appointed by God” so serfdom must not be!

20 SAMPLE AP DOCUMENT  Source: Reply of the Memmingen Town Council to the Articles of the Peasants of Memmingen, March 15,  On the article concerning serfdom: we, your lords, purchased this right for a considerable sum of money, and the serfdom of a Christian is no hindrance to the salvation of his soul. However, so that you, the subjects, may see and recognize the council’s good will, the council will release absolve its subjects from such serfdom that the council controls. In return the peasants shall pay us a reasonable sum of money

21 KEYS TO FINDING POINT OF VIEW IN THIS DOCUMENT  Who, or what is the author- Memmingen Town Council, made up of town leaders  How reliable is the source- Based on this document and the previous document the town council, made up of “educated people” controlled a certain number of serfs in the area  What type of document is this-It is a reply to the peasant demands made in the previous document for their release from serfdom  Ironic in the context that it agrees to release the serfs if they are willing to pay them for this freedom! It also bases their argument “Christianity” saying that serfdom is no hindrance to a persons salvation

22 SAMPLE AP DOCUMENT Source: Thomas Muntzer, preacher and theologian, open letter to the people of Allstedt, April 27, How long are you going to resist God’s will? The whole of Germany, France, and Italy are awake. Four abbeys were laid waste during Easter week. More peasants in the Black Forest have risen, 3,000 strong! Hammer away on the anvils of the princes and the lords, cast down their towers to the ground!

23 KEYS TO FINDING POINT OF VIEW IN THIS DOCUMENT  Who, or what, is the author- Thomas Muntzer, preacher and theologian  How reliable is the source- Based on what we know, he had been a follower of Luther, more “radical,” favored peasants  What type of document is this- It is an “open letter,” stretches the truth, might be propaganda, it is pro-revolt!  Chronologically it is also early in the revolt, might tend to be more pro-revolt

24 SAMPLE AP DOCUMENT Source: Martin Luther, theologian, Against the Murderous, Thieving Hordes of Peasants, Wittenberg, May 1525 The peasants forgot their place, violently took matters into their own hands, and are robbing and raging like dogs. It is clear that the assertions they made in their Twelve Articles were nothing but lies presented under the name of the Gospel. This is particularly the work of that devil, Thomas Munzter, who rules at Muhlhausen. The peasants are not content with belonging to the devil themselves; they force and compel many good people to join their devilish league. Anyone who consorts with them goes to the devil with them and is evil of all the guilty deeds that they commit.

25 KEYS TO FINDING POINT OF VIEW IN THIS DOCUMENT  Who, or what, is the author- Martin Luther, theologian, leader of the Protestant Reformation  How reliable is the source- Based on what we know, as leader of the reformation, he believed it to be spiritual, not worldly, peasants would be free in the next world  What type of document is this- It is a pamphlet that Luther wrote, obviously against peasants, why- needed support of princes against the HRE and the Catholic Church both politically and religiously, not the peasants!  Interesting in the fact that it also directly contradicts the previous document (written by Muntzer) that is pro- revolt, calling him the “devil” and lambasting those who follow him; so either for God or for the devil

26 READ THE QUESTION  Search for context clues, such as change over time  Analyze the documents before attempting the thesis  Group the documents to help develop the thesis

27 THE “THREE-SENTENCE” THESIS  “Introductory Sentence”  “Although Sentence”  “Explanatory Sentence”

28 THE INTRODUCTORY SENTENCE  Restates the question in an answer format  Tells the reader what the student will be writing about  Important! Leads to the “Although Statement”

29 THE ALTHOUGH SENTENCE  Key sentence in the first paragraph and the entire paper!  Sets up a hierarchy for the student to work from  Sets up a “tension” in the paper by establishing a position  Along with the “Explanatory Sentence” it provides the framework for the student to answer the prompt

30 THE EXPLANATORY SENTENCE  Tells the reader how or why the student’s position is the correct position  Focuses on the MAIN portion of the “Although Sentence;” not the whole sentence  Helps the student set-up the paragraphs

31 SAMPLE “QUESTION”  Analyze the causes of and the responses to the peasants’ revolt in the German states,

32  The primary reason for the peasants revolt in Germany was serfdom and responses to the revolts varied.  This sentence sets up “various” groups; reasons for and responses to revolts. SAMPLE INTRODUCTORY SENTENCE

33 SAMPLE ALTHOUGH SENTENCE  Although the major cause of the Peasants revolt in the German states was the condition of serfdom, the views of, and responses to the revolt often varied according to the social status of the person.  This sentence refers to the cause of the revolt and sets up the responses to the revolt.

34 SAMPLE EXPLANATORY SENTENCE  Those from the lower classes tended to favor the revolt while members of the upper classes viewed these rebellions with fear and alarm.  This sentence divides the responses in to two basic groups; for and against.

35  Views on causes of the revolt (Can include Documents 1,2,3,& 8)  Views of those who were in “favor” of the revolt (Can include 5,6,8,9)  Views of those against the revolt (Can include 4,7,10,11,12) SAMPLE PARAGRAPHS


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