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Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 2 Professionalism: Team, Meeting, Listening,

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Presentation on theme: "Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 2 Professionalism: Team, Meeting, Listening,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Business Communication: Process and Product, 8e Mary Ellen Guffey and Dana Loewy Instructor PowerPoint Library, 8e 2 Professionalism: Team, Meeting, Listening, Nonverbal and Etiquette Skills © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ch. 2, Slide 1

2 Understand the importance of teamwork in today’s digital-era workplace, and explain how you can contribute positively to team performance. Learning Objective 1 Ch. 2, Slide 2 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

3 Adding Value to Professional Teams Ch. 2, Slide 3 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Education Experience Hard skills: Technical expertise in your field Soft skills: Communication and interpersonal abilities What Do Digital-Age Employers Want?

4 Reality Check: Tech Skills Are Not Enough Ch. 2, Slide 4 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Knowledge workers need soft skills: Oral and written communication skills Appropriate nonverbal behavior Active listening Proper business etiquette Efficient and productive teamwork

5 Why Form Teams? Ch. 2, Slide 5 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Better decisions Less resistance to change Faster response Improved employee morale Increased productivity Greater buy-in Reduced risks

6 Collaborating in Virtual Teams Ch. 2, Slide 6 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © raven/Fotolia, © antoshkaforever/Fotolia Work is what you do rather than a place you go. Collaborate with coworkers in other cities and countries. Coordinate tasks across time and geographic zones. Participate and collaborate locally. Accomplish shared tasks without face-to-face contact. Pool expertise from various, diverse contributors.

7 The Four Phases of Team Development Ch. 2, Slide 7 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Select members Become acquainted Build trust Form collab- orativeculture Select members Become acquainted Build trust Form collab- orativeculture Forming Discuss alternatives Evaluate outcomes Apply criteria Prioritize alternatives Discuss alternatives Evaluate outcomes Apply criteria Prioritize alternatives Norming Identify problems Collect and share information Establish decision criteria Prioritize goals Identify problems Collect and share information Establish decision criteria Prioritize goals Storming Select alternative Analyze effects Implement plan Manage project Select alternative Analyze effects Implement plan Manage project Performing

8 Positive Team Behavior Ch. 2, Slide 8 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © vgstudio/Fotolia Setting rules and abiding by them Analyzing tasks and defining problems Contributing information and ideas Showing interest and listening actively Encouraging members to participate Synthesizing points of agreement

9 Ch. 2, Slide 9 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Lisa F. Young/Fotolia Negative Team Behavior Blocking the ideas of others Insulting and criticizing others Wasting the group’s time Making improper jokes and comments Failing to stay on task Withdrawing, failing to participate

10 Ch.2, Slide 10 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Vanessa/Fotolia Combating Groupthink Definition: Faulty decision- making processes by team members who are overly eager to agree with one another 1.Striving for diversity in age, gender, experience, and training 2.Encouraging open discussion 3.Searching for relevant information

11 Ch. 2, Slide 11 Combating Groupthink Definition: Faulty decision- making processes by team members who are overly eager to agree with one another 4.Evaluating many alternatives 5.Considering how a decision will be implemented 6.Planning for contingencies if decision fails to work © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Vanessa/Fotolia

12 Ch. 2, Slide 12 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Christopher Jones/Fotolia Reaching Group Decisions Majority Consensus Minority Averaging Authority rule with discussion

13 Ch. 2, Slide 13 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Defining Successful Teams Confront conflict. Collaborate rather than compete. Communicate effectively. Agree on purpose and procedures. Accept ethical responsi- bilities. Stay small and embrace diversity. Share leadership.

14 Ch. 2, Slide 14 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Six Steps for Dealing with Conflict Listen 1 Under- stand other points of view 2 Show you care about the relation- ship 3 Look for common ground 4 Invent new problem- solving options 5 Reach an agree- ment based on what is fair 6

15 Discuss effective practices and technologies for planning and participating in face-to-face meetings and virtual meetings. Learning Objective 2 Ch. 2, Slide 15 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

16 Ch. 2, Slide 16 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Planning and Participating in Face-to-Face and Virtual Meetings Meetings: Time Wasters or Opportunities? Meetings are disliked, but they can be career-critical. Judgments are formed and careers are made or blunted. Meetings are opportunities to demonstrate leadership, communication, and problem- solving skills.

17 Ch. 2, Slide 17 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia, © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia Planning a Productive Meeting Meet only when the topic demands a rich medium because it is important and requires an exchange of ideas. Invite the right people. Distribute an agenda. Use a digital calendar for scheduling. Train participants on technology.

18 Ch. 2, Slide 18 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © MelisendeVector.com/Fotolia, © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia, © Christopher Jones/Fotolia Running the Meeting Start on time and introduce the agenda. Appoint a secretary and a recorder. Encourage participation. Confront conflict frankly. Summarize along the way.

19 Ch. 2, Slide 19 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © iQoncept/Fotolia Ending the Meeting and Following Up Review meeting decisions. Distribute minutes of meeting. Remind people of action items.

20 Ch. 2, Slide 20 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Being a Productive Participant  Arrive early and come prepared.  Have a positive attitude.  Contribute respectfully.  Wait for others to finish.  Keep your voice calm and pleasant, yet energetic.

21 Ch. 2, Slide 21 Being a Productive Participant  Give credit to others.  Use electronic devices only for meeting-related tasks.  Help summarize.  Express your views in the meeting, not later.  Follow up by completing assigned tasks. © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia

22 Ch. 2, Slide 22 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © pawwod/Fotolia Virtual Meetings: Audioconferencing  Simple and effective  Most commonly used collaborative tool in business  Tools include enhanced speakerphone, telephone, and mobile phone  Also known as teleconferencing, conference calling, and phone conferencing

23 Ch. 2, Slide 23 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Virtual Meetings: Videoconferencing  Participants can see each other and small product details.  Collaborators connect in real time.  Expensive telepresence rooms are extremely life-like.  Organizations reduce travel expenses, travel time, greenhouse gases, and worker fatigue.  Tools include video, audio, and software.

24 Ch. 2, Slide 24 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Steve Young/Fotolia Virtual Meetings: Web Conferencing  Inexpensive and easily accessible  Used to share electronic documents and demonstrate products  Participants interact in real time  Tools include computer, Internet access, software, and (optional) camera.

25 Ch. 2, Slide 25 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Planning Virtual Meetings  Be sure everyone knows how to operate technology.  Distribute documents in advance and log on early.  Explain how to ask and answer questions.  Say your name before speaking.

26 Ch. 2, Slide 26 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © TAlex/Fotolia Techniques for Successful Virtual Meetings  Decide whether to “mute” phones.  Pay attention; don’t multitask.  Ask questions of specific people and use a strong voice.  Give everyone a chance to speak with “round-robin.”

27 Explain and apply active listening techniques. Learning Objective 3 Ch. 2, Slide 27 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

28 Ch. 2, Slide 28 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © julien tromeur/Fotolia Listening: A Career-Critical Soft Skill Active listening requires effort. Many of us are poor listeners. Listening skills promote career success. Good listeners make good managers.

29 Ch. 2, Slide 29 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Poor Listening Habits and its Causes People understand about half of the oral messages in a day. We listen at only 25% efficiency. Few of us receive training in listening. Other sounds and stimuli vie for our attention. We process speech much faster than others can speak.

30 Ch. 2, Slide 30 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Types of Workplace Listening Listening to supervisors Listening to colleagues and teammates Listening to customers

31 Ch. 2, Slide 31 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Keys to Building Powerful Listening Skills Control external and internal distractions. 1 1 Become actively involved. 2 2 Separate facts from opinions. 3 3 Identify important facts. 4 4 Avoid interrupting. 5 5

32 Ch. 2, Slide 32 © 2015Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Keys to Building Powerful Listening Skills Ask clarifying questions. 6 6 Paraphrase to increase understanding. 7 7 Capitalize on lag time. 8 8 Take notes to ensure retention. 9 9 Be aware of gender differences. 10

33 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Myths About Listening 1 Listening is a matter of intelligence. Fact: Careful listening is a learned behavior. 2 Speaking is more important than listening in the communication process. Fact: Speaking and listening are equally important. Ch. 2, Slide 33

34 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Myths About Listening 3 Listening is easy and requires little energy. Fact: Active listeners undergo the same physiological changes as a person jogging. 4 Listening and hearing are the same process. Fact: Listening is a conscious, selective process. Hearing is an involuntary act. Ch. 2, Slide 34

35 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Myths About Listening 5 Speakers are able to command listening. Fact: Speakers cannot make a person really listen. 6 Hearing ability determines listening ability. Fact: Listening happens mentally– between the ears. Ch. 2, Slide 35

36 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Myths About Listening 7 Speakers are totally responsible for the communication success. Fact: Communication is a two-way street. 8 Listening means only understanding a speaker’s words. Fact: Nonverbal signals also help listeners gain understanding. Ch. 2, Slide 36

37 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Ten Myths About Listening 9 Daily practice eliminates the need for listening training. Fact: Without effective listening training, most practice merely reinforces negative behaviors. 10 Competence in listening develops naturally. Fact: Untrained people listen at only 25 percent efficiency. Ch. 2, Slide 37

38 Understand how effective nonverbal communication can help you advance your career. Learning Objective 4 Ch. 2, Slide 38 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

39 Ch. 2, Slide 39 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Nonverbal Cues Carry Powerful Meanings Nonverbal communication includes all unwritten and unspoken messages, both intentional and unintentional.

40 Ch. 2, Slide 40 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © Yury Shchipakin/Fotolia, © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Forms of Nonverbal Communication Eye contact Facial expression Posture and gestures Time

41 Ch. 2, Slide 41 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Forms of Nonverbal Communication Space Territory Appearance of business documents Personal appearance

42 Ch. 2, Slide 42 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia Showing Professionalism When Communicating Establish and maintain eye contact. Use posture to show interest. Reduce or eliminate physical barriers. Improve your decoding skills. Probe for more information.

43 Ch. 2, Slide 43 Showing Professionalism When Communicating Interpret nonverbal meanings in context. Associate with people from diverse cultures. Appreciate the power of appearance. Observe yourself on video. Enlist friends and family. © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © helen cingisiz/Fotolia

44 Improve your competitive advantage by developing professionalism and business etiquette skills. Learning Objective 5 Ch. 2, Slide 44 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part.

45 Ch. 2, Slide 45 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © denis_pc/Fotolia Professionalism Leads to Success Good manners and a businesslike, professional demeanor are among the top soft skills that employers seek in job candidates. Projecting and maintaining a professional image can make a real difference in helping you obtain and keep the job of your dreams.

46 Ch. 2, Slide 46 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Projecting Professionalism: Speech Habits  uptalk  like used as a filler  go for said  slang and profanity  poor grammar Unprofessional Your credibility can be seriously damaged by sounding uneducated, crude, or adolescent. Professional

47 Ch. 2, Slide 47 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Projecting Professionalism:  incomplete sentences  misspelled words  exclamation points  IM slang and textspeak  mindless chatter  sloppy messages Unprofessional Employers like to see subjects, verbs, and punctuation. They dislike IM abbreviations. They value conciseness and correct spelling, even in brief messages and texts. Professional

48 Ch. 2, Slide 48 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Projecting Professionalism: Internet addresses such as: or Unprofessional addresses should include a name or a positive, businesslike expression; they should not sound cute or like a chat room nickname. Professional

49 Ch. 2, Slide 49 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia Projecting Professionalism: Voic An outgoing message with strident background music, weird sounds, or a joke message. Unprofessional An outgoing message that states your name or phone number and provides instructions for leaving a message. Professional

50 Ch. 2, Slide 50 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia Projecting Professionalism: Telephone Presence Soap operas, thunderous music, or a TV football game playing noisily in the background when you answer the phone. Unprofessional A quiet background when you answer the telephone, especially if you are expecting a prospective employer’s call. Professional

51 Ch. 2, Slide 51 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © mostafa fawzy/Fotolia Projecting Professionalism: Cell Phones, Tablets Using electronics during business meetings for unrelated purposes or during conversations with fellow employees; raising your voice (cell yell); forcing others to overhear your calls. Unprofessional Turning off phone and message notification, both audible and vibrate, during meetings; using your smart devices only for meeting-related purposes. Professional

52 Ch. 2, Slide 52 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. Projecting Professionalism: Texting Sending and receiving text messages during meetings, allowing texting to interrupt face-to-face conversations, or texting when driving. Unprofessional Sending appropriate business text messages only when necessary (perhaps when a cell phone call would disturb others). Professional

53 Ch. 2, Slide 53 © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © kyoko/Fotolia Gaining an Etiquette Edge Use polite words. Express sincere appreciation and praise. Be selective in sharing personal information. Don’t put people down. Respect coworkers’ space.

54 Ch. 2, Slide 54 Gaining an Etiquette Edge Rise above others’ rudeness. Be considerate when sharing space and equipment. Choose the high road in conflict. Disagree agreeably. © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © kyoko/Fotolia

55 Ch. 2, Slide 55 END © 2015 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or duplicated, or posted to a publicly accessible website, in whole or in part. © kyoko/Fotolia


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