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Reminder: Write NPD on every page of Cornell Notes. Pages with no name will be thrown away. Cornell Notes summaries must be written in full sentences.

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Presentation on theme: "Reminder: Write NPD on every page of Cornell Notes. Pages with no name will be thrown away. Cornell Notes summaries must be written in full sentences."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reminder: Write NPD on every page of Cornell Notes. Pages with no name will be thrown away. Cornell Notes summaries must be written in full sentences. Summaries must contain at least three sentences. Reminders Summaries should be like mini-skirts – short, but covers everything that needs to be covered 1

2 Vocabulary An Amendment – noun a change, correction, addition, or improvement A Grievance - noun a formal complaint To Redress - verb to fix something (law) to make it fair To Abridge - verb to cut short something 2

3 Think of the one word that best defines what it means to be an American. In one word … 3

4 What does it mean to be free? Freedom to? ….. to do what? Freedom from? …. from what? 4

5 What does it mean to be free? Do you know any of the rules (laws) that guarantee your freedom as an American citizen? 5

6 The rights everyone knows by heart The Fifth Amendment, which protects you from self-incrimination, is often called the Miranda Warning. It’s the warning that police explain to suspects. It means you can’t be forced to give information to police that can be used to convict you of a crime. Can you recite the Miranda Warning? 6

7 The rights everyone knows by heart You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used against you in a court of law. You have the right to speak to an attorney and to have an attorney present during any questioning. If you cannot afford a lawyer, one will be provided for you at government expense. 7

8 The rights everyone knows by heart Why do almost all Americans know their rights under the Miranda Warning? How many of you expect to be arrested at some point? What are the rights you MUST know because you use them every day? The rights covered by the First Amendment! 8

9 The MOST important amendment to the U.S. Constitution is the First Amendment. Know Your Rights! 9

10 The First Amendment 10

11 What is the First Amendment? What are the five freedoms that are covered by the First Amendment? 11

12 Can anyone name the 5 freedoms that are covered by the First Amendment? Can anyone name the 5 characters on The Simpsons? 12

13 Homer, Marge, Bart, Lisa, and Maggie 13

14 A 2006 survey showed that more Americans could name The Simpsons characters than the five freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment. 14

15 Discussion Why do you think more Americans can name the characters on a TV cartoon than can name the five basic freedoms? Why might it be easier to remember facts about pop culture than facts about history? 15

16 16

17 The First Amendment: The 45 words that protect us all Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances. 17

18 It’s sad to note that when it comes to the First Amendment, most Americans don't know their rights from their wrongs! According to a 2006 survey, only one in 1,000 Americans (that’s about the population of CRMS) can list all five freedoms protected by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Just in case you're one of those 999 people who can't, the rights are: freedom of religion freedom of speech freedom of the press freedom of assembly freedom to petition for redress of grievances. 18

19 GRASP your Freedoms … “ G ” freedom to petition for redress of grievances “ R ” freedom of religion “ A ” freedom to assemble “ S ” freedom of speech “ P ” freedom of the press An Acronym To Make The 5 Freedoms Easy to Remember 19

20 Although Americans failed the First Amendment quiz, they passed the Bart Simpson section of the survey with flying colors. Chinese Proverb: Teachers open the doors, but you must enter by yourself. 20

21 Those findings made Gene Policinski, executive director of the First Amendment Center, want to eat his shorts (as Bart Simpson would say). "These are such basic freedoms, and they're in our lives every day," he said. "All we have to do is look around." 21

22 Go home tonight and challenge your family to this test. See how many of the 5 basic rights your siblings, parents, and friends can name. We’ll discuss the results tomorrow. END PART 1 22

23 Part 2 How did your parents do? How many of the five basic freedoms could they name? Were you surprised? 23

24 No matter how old you are or what state you live in, you exercise First Amendment freedoms every day. Can you think of some examples? 24

25  When you turn on the television, you can choose the show you want to watch.  If you disagree with a law, you can write a letter to your state representative.  If you don't like something the government is doing, you can say so without getting in trouble. 25

26 What was the reason for the First Amendment? The nation's founders wanted to ensure that Americans were free to live their lives as they wanted to so they ratified (approved) the Bill of Rights in

27 What was the reason for the First Amendment? The Bill of Rights contains the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. Since 1791, the U.S. has added only 17 more for a total of 27 amendments. 27

28 The reason the founders included this freedom: 1. Freedom of religion The Colonists came to America in search of religious freedom. They wanted to worship without fear of punishment. The nation's founders included this clause to make sure Congress could not establish a national religion nor stop people from practicing their chosen religion. 28

29 Freedom of Religion The First Amendment prohibits government from establishing a religion and protects each person's right to practice (or not practice) any faith without government interference. 29

30 The reason the founders included this freedom: 2. Freedom of speech The Colonists' rocky relationship with Great Britain made them determined to prevent their new government from abusing its power. This clause ensures that the government can't stop people from saying almost anything they want to say--even if it's unpopular or critical of the president. 30

31 Free speech The First Amendment says that people have the right to speak freely without government interference. There are limits, though. You may not yell “Fire!” in a crowded movie theatre. 31

32 The reason the founders included this freedom: 3. Freedom of the Press The nation's founders feared that if the government controlled the nation's newspapers, it could violate the Constitution without anyone finding out. This clause allows U.S. newspapers, magazines, and other media to report on whatever they want, as long as they don't print false information or invade people's privacy. 32

33 Freedom of the Press The First Amendment gives the press the right to publish news, information, and opinions without government interference. This also means people have the right to publish their own newspapers, newsletters, magazines, etc. The information the press prints MUST be true. The First Amendment does not give the press the right to print lies. 33

34 The reason the founders included this freedom: 4. Freedom of assembly Majority may rule in the United States, but the nation's founders wanted to make sure minority voices were still heard. This clause gives Americans the right to protest or parade publicly in support of any cause--no matter how controversial--as long as they do it peacefully. 34

35 Freedom To Peaceably Assemble The First Amendment says that people have the right to gather in public to march, protest, demonstrate, carry signs, and otherwise express their views in a nonviolent way. It also means people can join and associate with groups and organizations without interference. People DO NOT have the freedom to assemble to plan a riot or a crime. 35

36 The reason the founders included this freedom: 5. Freedom to petition the government for a redress of grievances The Colonists started the American Revolution ( ) because they had little voice in Great Britain's government. This clause requires that the government listen to what citizens have to say, whether it be through letter writing or lawsuits. 36

37 Petition about grievances The First Amendment says that people have the right to appeal to government in favor of or against policies that affect them or that they feel strongly about. This freedom includes the right to gather signatures in support of a cause and to lobby legislative bodies for or against legislation. 37

38 The First Amendment does not give people the right to say or do whatever they want. There have been many court cases involving the First Amendment. The courts have decided in some cases to set limits to our First Amendment rights. 38

39 For example: ● The First Amendment does not give a person the right to use language that causes others to act violently and puts people in danger. ● The First Amendment does not give a person the right to yell “fire!” in a crowded movie theater. ● The First Amendment does not give a person the right to remove a book from a library just because he or she doesn’t like the ideas in the book. 39


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