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Professional Responsibilities. Overview Profession and Professional Defined Air Force/CAP Core Values Uniform Wear Cadet/Senior Protection Program Customs.

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Presentation on theme: "Professional Responsibilities. Overview Profession and Professional Defined Air Force/CAP Core Values Uniform Wear Cadet/Senior Protection Program Customs."— Presentation transcript:

1 Professional Responsibilities

2 Overview Profession and Professional Defined Air Force/CAP Core Values Uniform Wear Cadet/Senior Protection Program Customs and Courtesies Senior Member Role (cont)

3 Overview (cont) Senior Member Traits Senior Member Principles Correcting Inappropriate Behavior Rewarding Appropriate Behavior

4 Profession/Professional Defined Profession: Occupation or vocation requiring training in the liberal arts or the sciences and advanced study in a specialized field. The body of qualified persons or one specific occupation. Professional: Of, relating to, engaged in, or suitable for a profession. Engaged in a specific activity as a source of livelihood. Having a great skill or experience in a particular field or activity. Reference: The American Heritage Dictionary, Second Edition.

5 Air Force/ CAP Core Values Reference: USAF Core Values Pamphlet, Jan 97 Integrity First Service Before Self Excellence In All We Do For All Team Members Exists for all personnel (cont)

6 Air Force/ CAP Core Values (cont) More than Minimum Standards –Reminder of what it takes to accomplish the mission. –Inspiration to do the very best at all times. –Common bond among all comrades in arms. –Glue that unifies the force and ties us to great warriors and public servants of the past. (Review USAF Core Value Pamphlet)

7 Uniform Wear Reference: CAP Manual 39-1, 1 Jul 97 Wear of the Uniform Uniform Wear Policy Command Responsibility

8 Wear of the Uniform Others, both military and civilian, draw conclusions about you, CAP and the Air Force when they see you in uniform. More important now since there is less distinction between USAF and CAP military uniforms. Standards are influenced to some extent by tradition and reflect the image of the USAF. You are a reflection of the U. S. Air Force!

9 Uniform Wear Policy Senior Members/Cadets conducting training will wear the CAP uniform. Cadets are required to purchase the minimum basic uniform. Senior members and cadets 18 or older must meet CAP weight standards to wear USAF uniform. Senior members not meeting weight/grooming standards DO NOT wear the USAF style uniform --Wear the selected CAP uniform.

10 Command Responsibility Commanders will ensure CAP members present well-groomed appearance which reflects credit upon CAP as the USAF Auxiliary. Commanders will correct uniform violators promptly and inform all members of the proper wear of the uniform. Senior Members and Cadets have the authority to correct violators -- junior personnel must use Tact and Diplomacy.

11 Cadet/Senior Member Protection Program Reference: CAP Pamphlet 50-6 and CAP Regulation Protects both YOU and the cadets. –CAP members are expected to avoid even the appearance of impropriety involving cadets and to report suspected abuse immediately. (cont)

12 Cadet/Senior Member Protection Program (cont) Rules of Engagement –Never touch a cadet without his/her permission. –Never assign exercises as a punishment. –Never yell at a cadet, except in extreme cases (i.e. safety issues). –Never use abusive language, swearing or name calling.

13 Customs and Courtesies Reference: CAP Pamphlet 151 and AF Pamphlet , Volume I, Enlisted Promotion Fitness Exam Study Guide. Custom: An act or ceremony stemming from tradition which is enforceable as an unwritten law. Courtesy: Act of respect or politeness paid to people. –Military courtesy is based on mutual respect among members of a unique profession. Military customs and courtesies play an extremely important role in building morale, esprit de corps, discipline, and mission effectiveness.

14 Saluting Courtesy exchanged between members of CAP when in military-style uniform. –Greeting and Symbol of mutual respect. Salute: –When in military-style uniform. –President, Medal of Honor recipients, commissioned and warrant officers. –On military installations (staff cars -- flag or metal plate). –When in doubt...

15 Rank, Recognition and Respect Common acts of courtesy by all CAP members aid in maintaining discipline and promoting a smooth conduct of affairs. –Always give senior ranking person the position of honor. –Report-in by removing hat, knocking once and entering when told to do so -- two paces from the desk, halt, salute and report-in. –Rise and stand at attention when a senior official enters the room. (cont)

16 Rank, Recognition and Respect (cont) Junior personnel enter aircraft/automobile first (sit to the left) and exit last. Military courtesy and respect are a “Two-Way Street”. Officers must practice courtesy and good human relations when dealing with subordinates. RHIP (Rank Has Its Privileges) -- Do Not Abuse!

17 Titles of Address All military personnel are addressed by title/rank. It is acceptable for ranking members to address subordinates by their first name. –Sir, Ma’am, Doctor, Chaplain, Father, etc., in place of title/rank can be used. –Cadets are addressed by Cadet, Title, Rank and last name, Mister and Miss is also appropriate.

18 Military Etiquette Etiquette is defined as common, everyday courtesy. Everyone must practice good manners such as: –Say “Please” and “Thank You” –Don’t gossip -- go to the source –Use proper telephone etiquette –Call if you’re going to be late –Don’t interrupt

19 Senior Member Role Ensure paperwork is timely and complies with CAP directives. Provide advice, guidance, and approval to cadet leaders and cadets. Set a positive example for professional conduct. Leave your legacy by training and mentoring.

20 Senior Member Traits Integrity : Total commitment to the highest personal and professional standards. Loyalty: Three-dimensional trait which includes faithfulness to superiors, peers, and subordinates. Commitment: Complete devotion to duty. (cont)

21 Senior Member Traits (cont) Energy: An enthusiasm and drive to take the initiative. Decisiveness: A willingness to act. Selflessness: Sacrificing personal needs.

22 Senior Member Principles Know your job Know yourself Set the example Care for your people Communicate Educate Equip (cont)

23 Senior Member Principles (cont) Motivate Establish goals Accept your responsibility Develop teamwork –Leaders must mold a collection of individual performers into a cohesive team which works together to accomplish the mission. Teamwork results when people are willing to put the mission before all else.

24 Correcting Inappropriate Behavior Determine the root cause –Attitude –Training –Other Correction must be immediate, consistent and tied to the behavior. (cont)

25 Correcting Inappropriate Behavior (cont) Correcting Inappropriate Behavior –Discipline Track Actions: –Verbal counseling – Letter of Counseling –Admonishment –Letter of Reprimand –Suspension Progressive buildup Temporarily withholding privileges

26 Rewarding Appropriate Behavior Recognize accomplishments Initiate Swearing-in, Mitchell, Earhart, and Eaker Award special ceremonies Involve the parents Develop a merit system Praise in public Create certificates/awards (cont)

27 Rewarding Appropriate Behavior (cont) Communicate your appreciation Nominate for Cadet of the Year

28 Summary Profession and Professional Defined Air Force/CAP Core Values Uniform Wear Cadet/Senior Protection Program Customs and Courtesies Senior Member Role (cont)

29 Summary (cont) Senior Member Traits Senior Member Principles Correcting Inappropriate Behavior Rewarding Appropriate Behavior


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