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Jim Shriner IEPs and Behavior Intervention Plans for Students with EBD Illinois Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders February 2011 Lisle, IL.

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Presentation on theme: "Jim Shriner IEPs and Behavior Intervention Plans for Students with EBD Illinois Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders February 2011 Lisle, IL."— Presentation transcript:

1 Jim Shriner IEPs and Behavior Intervention Plans for Students with EBD Illinois Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders February 2011 Lisle, IL Preparation of this presentation was supported, in part, by a grant (R324J060002) from the U. S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center on Special Education Research, and from the Illinois Stat Board of Education (Part B- Discretionary Programs) awarded to the author. Opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of the U. S. Department of Education or Offices within it.

2 IEP-Q Focus Support provided by the Tutorial will result in the development of higher quality IEPs that: Help prioritize annual goals in relation to state standards and the general education curriculum. Are used routinely in planning and implementing instruction on general curricular skills. As a result, IEP goals will be reviewed and met with a higher frequency and there will be an increase in students’ standards-based achievement.

3 Site Features Help Topics offer guidance, examples and answers to frequently asked questions for nearly every area of the Illinois IEP. Links to IEP planning worksheets, examples, student scenarios and relevant tools on the site provide complete assistance gathered from an experienced group of IEP experts. https://iepq.education.illinois.edu Help Topics

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6 Site Features Our IEP Tools feature Goal Assistants to help instructors write Academic, Functional and Transition goals that are referenced to Illinois Learning and Social/Emotional Standards. Other tools include reference charts, worksheets for teachers, parents and students, and links to other tools on the Web. Toolbox

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13 Where in the IEP? Present levels Special factors Annual goals Program summary Attached page

14 Site Features Participants / Student Strengths Operational Definition of Target Behavior Setting / Antecedents / Consequences Hypothesis of Behavioral Function Functional Behavioral Assessment

15 Base the BIP on a Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) Define target behavior Develop a hypothesis as to the function of the behavior Collect data (direct and indirectly) Validate the function and key context variables –Triangulate data –Data analysis Develop the BIP

16 Behavioral Intent Students act for a purpose Behavioral intent = purpose sought by the student Most children seek similar goals in social situations Behavior used by students with behavior problems is not accepted or desired by others

17 Behavior Intervention Plans... Support desired alternatives that allow student to meet their needs Make the current undesired behavior less effective in meeting the student’s need

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19 Function Matrix Umbreit & Liaupsin, 2002

20 We must affect the efficiency of target and replacement behaviors: irrelevant ineffective inefficient relevant effective efficient Goals for Target vs. Replacement Behaviors

21 Focus on Positives Positive behavioral interventions, strategies and supports Long-term behavior change only comes from positives Need to balance the equation

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23 2 Components of a BIP Teaching plan Crisis plan

24 Teaching Plan Definitions Prevention Intervention Skill building

25 Teaching Model meet desired criteria Setting Event Problem Behavior Trigger (antecedent) Naturally Maintaining Consequence LTO Replacement Behavior short term objective Artificial Reinforcers (teacher controlled)

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27 Evaluating the BIP S ystematic review Data collection Communication Criteria for success (long and short term)

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30 Site Features The Resource Library brings together important sources of information on IEP development, including books, journal articles, web sites, and behavior data collection forms. Resource Library

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33 Resources

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36 The IEP Quality Indicator Scale: IQUIS Mitchell L. Yell, Ph.D. Erik Drasgow, Ph.D. Insoo Oh, Ph.D. XiaoFeng (Steven) Liu, Ph.D. The IQUIS is an evaluation instrument used to assess the procedural and substantive quality of individualized education programs (IEPs)

37 The IEP Quality Indicator Scale - IQUIS IQUIS Substantive Requirements Substantive requirements: Substantive components of the IEP refer to the quality or meaningfulness of the IEP Example: If a goal is observable, measurable, and appropriate given a students (PLAAFP) statement that it meets the IQUIS definition of substantive We have found no IEP assessment instruments that examine the substantive quality of an IEP

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41 IQUIS & IQUIS-B Agreement

42 Agreement Highlights The IQUIS yields good overall agreement levels. Some sections (e.g. Behavior) need refinement to raise agreement levels. Procedural and Substantive items, when grouped on IQUIS, meet acceptable agreement levels. Supplemental Form B (Annual Goals/Short-term Objectives) contains substantive items only, and results in high agreement levels.

43 Study Highlights: Year 2 Academic Year Focus on Academic Improvement 25% of students (n=37) had both Academic and Functional Goals (excluding Speech) 20 students had Behavior Intervention Plans

44 Preliminary Highlights: Year 2 Table A4 IEP quality comparison before/after Tutorial using the IEP Quality Indicator Scale (IQUIS) for both the High and Low Usage Groups. * Before Tutorial/After Tutorial Percentage Change for Subscale Items (p<.05). ** Before Tutorial/After Tutorial Percentage Change for Subscale Items (p<.01).

45 Preliminary Highlights: Year 2 Comparison Highlights: IQUIS The percentage of items rated as adequate improved for PROCEDURAL items from pre- Tutorial use (92%) to post-Tutorial use (95%). The percentage of items rated as adequate improved for SUBSTANTIVE items from pre- Tutorial use (42%) to post-Tutorial use (54%) The use of an “all or nothing” scoring protocol limited the sensitivity of the IQUIS to capture the relative strength of pre-post changes within and across IEPs. However, goals and objectives did maintain an upward trend.

46 Initial Student Outcomes Data: Year 1 (Pilot Test) Figure 1: Mean score comparison of MAP Reading Assessment : Low Usage and High Usage Groups.

47 Status and Next Steps Efforts to expand the Tutorial content to include areas of access skills and social/emotional learning (e.g., study/organizational skills, social/behavioral skills, self- regulatory skills, and self-advocacy skills). Increased involvement/input of Related Services personnel (e.g., psychologist, school social worker) Excluding Speech, Social/behavioral goals account for about 50% of all related services entries (Illinois State Board of Education, 2008)

48 Now Available to Illinois Educators Public Version Website: https://iepq.education.illinois.edu At this time, ISBE requires that a District Superintendent or Director of Special Education request access for his/her teachers.


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