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1 The Flow of Food: Storage Chapter Number 7 Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Book Title Book Author.

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Presentation on theme: "1 The Flow of Food: Storage Chapter Number 7 Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Book Title Book Author."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The Flow of Food: Storage Chapter Number 7 Class Name Instructor Name Date, Semester Book Title Book Author

2 Learning Objectives After this presentation, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes Requirements for labeling and date marking food How to rotate food using first-in, first-out (FIFO) Temperature requirements for food in storage Practices that can prevent temperature-abuse during storage

3 Learning Objectives (cont.) After this presentation, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes Locations where food should not be stored Practices that can prevent cross-contamination during storage Guidelines for storing specific types of food including meat, poultry, fish, shellfish, eggs, produce, and dry food

4 Date marking: A date on ready-to-eat TCS food held for more than 24 hours indicating by when the food must be sold, eaten, or thrown out. First-in, first-out (FIFO): Method of stock rotation in which products are shelved based on their use-by or expiration dates, so oldest products are used first. Reduced-oxygen packaged (ROP) food: Packaging method that reduces the amount of oxygen available in order to slow microbial growth. ROP methods include sous vide, MAP, and vacuum packaging. KEY TERMS 7.0

5 Any item not stored in its original container must be labeled. The label must include the common name of the food or a statement that clearly and accurately identifies it. If a food is easily identifiable by sight and will not be mistaken for another item, it is not necessary to label the item. LABELING FOOD FOR USE ON-SITE Requirements for labeling and date marking food 7.1

6 Food packaged in the operation that is being sold to customers for use at home must be labeled. The label must include the following information: – Common name of the food or a statement that clearly identifies it – Quantity of the food – List of ingredients in descending order by weight if the item contains two or more ingredients – List of artificial colors and flavors in the food—chemical preservatives must also be listed – Name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, or distributor – Source of each major food allergen contained in the food—this is not necessary if the source is already part of the common name of the ingredient LABELING FOOD THAT IS PACKAGED ON-SITE FOR RETAIL SALE Requirements for labeling and date marking food 7.1

7 Ready-to-eat TCS food must include date marking if it will be held for longer than 24 hours. – The date marking must indicate when the food must be sold, eaten, or thrown out. – Ready-to-eat TCS food can be stored for only seven days if it is held at 41°F (5°C) or lower. The count begins on the day the food was prepared or a commercial container was opened. Commercially Processed Food – Sometimes commercially processed food will have a use-by date that is less than seven days from the date the container was opened. In this case, the container should be marked with this use-by date as long as the date is based on food safety. Combining Food – When combining food in a dish with different use-by dates, the discard date of the dish should be based on the earliest prepared food. DATE MARKING Requirements for labeling and date marking food 7.1

8 Food must be rotated while in storage to maintain quality and limit the growth of pathogens. Food items must be rotated so the items with the earliest use-by or expiration dates are used before those with later dates. Here is one way to use the FIFO method: – Identify the food item’s use-by or expiration date. – Store items with the earliest use-by or expiration dates in front of items with later dates, as shown in the photo at left. – Once shelved, use those items stored in front first. – Throw out food that has passed its manufacturer’s use-by or expiration date. ROTATION How to rotate food using first-in, first-out (FIFO) 7.2

9 Pathogens can grow when food is not stored at the correct temperature. Follow these guidelines to keep food safe: – Store TCS food at an internal temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower, or 135°F (57°C) or higher. Randomly sample the internal temperature of stored food using a calibrated thermometer on a regular basis. – Store meat, poultry, seafood, and dairy items in the coldest part of the unit, away from the door. – Store frozen food at temperatures that keep it frozen. – Make sure storage units have at least one air-temperature measuring device. It must be accurate to +/- 3°F or +/- 1.5°C. It must be located in the warmest part of refrigerated units or coldest part of hot-holding units. TEMPERATURES Temperature requirements for food in storage 7.3

10 Do not overload coolers or freezers. Storing too many food items prevents good airflow and makes the units work harder to stay cold. Consider using cold curtains in walk-in coolers and freezers to help maintain temperatures. Use open shelving. Do not line shelves with aluminum foil, sheet pans, or paper. This restricts circulation of cold air in the unit. Monitor food temperatures in coolers regularly. Randomly sample the temperature of stored food to verify that the cooler is working. Defrost freezers regularly. They are more efficient when free of frost. Move food to another freezer while defrosting. TEMPERATURES (cont.) Temperature requirements for food in storage 7.3

11 Do not overload coolers or freezers. Storing too many food items prevents good airflow and makes the units work harder to stay cold. Consider using cold curtains in walk-in coolers and freezers to help maintain temperatures. Use open shelving. Do not line shelves with aluminum foil, sheet pans, or paper. This restricts circulation of cold air in the unit. Monitor food temperatures in coolers regularly. Randomly sample the temperature of stored food to verify that the cooler is working. Defrost freezers regularly. They are more efficient when free of frost. Move food to another freezer while defrosting. PRACTICES THAT CAN PREVENT TEMPERATURE- ABUSE DURING STORAGE Practices that can prevent temperature-abuse during storage 7.4

12 Food and nonfood items must be stored in ways that prevent cross- contamination. Follow these guidelines – Supplies Store food, linens, and single-use items (e.g., sleeve of single-use cups, single-use gloves), in designated storage areas. These items must be stored away from walls and at least six inches (15 centimeters) off the floor. Single-use items should be stored in the original packaging. PREVENTING CROSS-CONTAMINATION Locations where food should not be stored 7.5

13 – Containers Store food in containers intended for food. Containers should be durable, leak-proof, and able to be sealed or covered. Never use empty food containers to store chemicals or put food in empty chemical containers. Wrap or cover all food correctly. – Cleaning Keep all storage areas clean and dry. Clean floors, walls, and shelving in coolers, freezers, dry-storage areas, and heated holding cabinets regularly. Clean up spills and leaks promptly. Clean dollies, carts, transporters, and trays often. Store food in containers that have been cleaned and sanitized. Store dirty linens away from food. PREVENTING CROSS-CONTAMINATION (cont.) Locations where food should not be stored 7.5

14 Store raw meat, poultry, and seafood separately from ready-to-eat food. If raw and ready-to-eat food cannot be stored separately, store ready-to-eat food above raw meat, poultry, and seafood. – This will prevent juices from raw food from dripping onto ready- to-eat food. Store raw meat, poultry, and seafood in coolers in the following top-to-bottom order: – seafood – whole cuts of beef and pork – ground meat and fish – whole and ground poultry STORAGE ORDER Practices that can prevent cross-contamination during storage 7.6

15 This order is based on the minimum internal cooking temperature of each food. STORAGE ORDER (cont.) Practices that can prevent cross-contamination during storage 7.6

16 The general storage guidelines apply to most food. However, certain types of food have special requirements. – Meat Store meat in its own storage unit or in the coldest part of the cooler. If meat is removed from its original packaging, wrap it in airtight, moisture-proof material or place it in clean and sanitized containers. Primal cuts, quarters, sides of raw meat, and slab bacon can be hung on clean and sanitized hooks or placed on sanitized racks. Do not store meat above other food. – Poultry Store raw poultry at an internal temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower. Frozen poultry should be stored at temperatures that will keep it frozen. If meat has been removed from its original packaging, place it in airtight containers or wrap it in airtight material. Ice-packed poultry can be stored in a cooler as is. Use self-draining containers\Change the ice and sanitize the container often. MEAT AND POULTRY Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7

17 Fresh fish is very sensitive to time-temperature abuse. It can spoil quickly if handled incorrectly. Store fresh fish at an internal temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower. Keep fillets and steaks in original packaging, or tightly wrap them in moisture-proof materials. Fresh, whole fish can be packed in flaked or crushed ice. – Ice beds should be self-draining. – Change the ice and clean and sanitize the container often. – Store frozen fish at temperatures that will keep it frozen. FISH Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7

18 Store shucked shellfish at an internal temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower. Store live shellfish in its original container at an air temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower. Keep shellstock identification tags on file for 90 days from the date the last shellfish was sold or served from the container. You may store live shellfish, such as clams, oysters, mussels, and scallops, in a display tank under one of two conditions: – The tank has a sign stating that the shellfish are for display only. – For shellfish to be served to customers, a variance has been obtained from the local regulatory authority that allows the shellfish to be served to customers. – You will need to show the following: Water from other tanks will not flow into the display tank. Using the display tank will not affect food quality or safety. Shellstock ID tags have been retained as required. SHELLFISH Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7

19 Store shell eggs at an air temperature of 45°F (7°C) or lower. Maintain constant temperature and humidity levels in coolers used to store shell eggs. Do not wash shell eggs before storing them. They are washed and sanitized at the packing facility. Plan to use all shell eggs within four to five weeks of the packing date. Keep shell eggs in cold storage until the time they are used. Take out only as many eggs as are needed for immediate use. Store frozen egg items at temperatures that will keep them frozen. Store liquid eggs according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Dried egg items can be stored in a cool dry-storage area. Once they are reconstituted (mixed with water), store them in the cooler at 41°F (5°C) or lower. Do not reconstitute more dried egg item than is needed for immediate use. Milk – Store milk at 41°F (5°C) or lower. EGGS & MILK Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7

20 Always store reduced-oxygen packaged (ROP) food at temperatures recommended by the manufacturer or at 41°F (5°C) or lower. This includes modified atmosphere packaged (MAP), vacuum-packed, and sous vide food. Frozen items should be stored at temperatures that will keep them frozen. Store and handle these items carefully as ROP items are especially susceptible to the growth of Clostridium botulinum. Always check the expiration date before using ROP items. Throw the item away if the package shows any of the following characteristics: – It is torn or slimy. – It contains excessive liquid. – The food item bubbles, indicating the possible growth of Clostridium botulinum. ROP FOOD Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7

21 UHT and Aseptically Packaged Food – Can be stored at room temperature – Once opened, store UHT and aseptically packaged food in the cooler at 41°F (5°C) or lower. – Store UHT items that are not aseptically packaged at an internal temperature of 41°F (5°C) or lower. Canned Goods – Discard damaged cans. – Keep dry-storage areas dry. Too much moisture will cause cans to rust. – Wipe cans clean with a sanitized cloth before opening them. This will help prevent dirt from falling into the contents of the can. Dry Food – Keep flour, cereal, and grain items, such as pasta or crackers, in airtight containers. – Before using dry food, check containers or packages for damage from insects or rodents. Cereal and grain items are often targets for these pests. UHT FOODS, CANNED GOODS, & DRY FOODS Guidelines for storing specific types of food 7.7


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