Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Online Course Development: From an Art to a Craft John Morris Coordinator: Academic Technology Drexel University – Mike Scheuermann.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Online Course Development: From an Art to a Craft John Morris Coordinator: Academic Technology Drexel University – Mike Scheuermann."— Presentation transcript:

1 Online Course Development: From an Art to a Craft John Morris Coordinator: Academic Technology Drexel University – Mike Scheuermann Adjunct Assistant Professor Drexel University – Copyright Drexel University, 2001 This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.

2 The Developer’s View John Morris Coordinator: Academic Technology Drexel University –

3 What we AREN’T going to talk about! Course Management Systems (Feature / Function lists) Motivating Faculty toward web-based delivery Educating the administrators about the realities of web-based education Learning Styles Copyright and Intellectual Property issues American Disabilities Act (ADA – access for the challenged)

4 What we ARE going to talk about! Why “From an Art to a Craft” Background – the “Drexel Experience” Best Practices From an Instructor’s Perspective

5 Why the Title? Art – Style, Aesthetics the creation of beautiful or thought-provoking works, for example, in painting, music, or writing the techniques used by somebody in a particular field, or the use of those techniques Craft – Style, Utilitarian a profession or activity …, involving the skillful making of decorative or practical objects by hand profession or activity that requires skill and training, or experience, or specialized knowledge

6 A Comparison to Architecture Frank Lloyd Wright Art: to be admired from afar Craft: to be useable Often art isn’t utilitarian and crafts aren’t beautiful

7 The Bottom Line We would rather have a well crafted, albeit less aesthetic looking course than have a course that looks great but doesn’t meet expectations in supporting the elearning process. Course development is typically evolutionary not revolutionary

8 In the beginning when man created web-based education, the pedagogy was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the instructor …

9 The Formless Void The exemplars are F2F and interactive CD’s No Bob Villa, No “Hometime” No motivation for faculty Too much motivation for administrations Lots of technology but not much knowledge about how to use it effectively No Best Practices Most faculty teach the way their mentor taught … and many more

10 The “Drexel Experience” (bce) No centralize support (helpdesk, ID, development…) Instructional units chose their own CMS (by 2000, TopClass, Lotus Notes, eCollege and Blackboard were all being used to deliver courses Various hosting conditions – 3 rd party, departmental, CMS Vendors No consistancy! Pedagogical, Structural, GUI, Quality, Assessment, Best Practices, … Approximately 85 courses available

11 The “Drexel Experience” (ce) Present WebCT established as the platform of choice Support infrastructure established (WebGroup, helpdesk, hosting, ID, development, mentoring, outreach, training…) Best Practices established Courses beginning to migrate from other CMS platforms to WebCT Over 130 courses under WebCT in 12 months Supporting 3 institutions

12 The Four Basic “Best Practices” Support Content Creation, Navigation and “Look and Feel”, and Project Management Pedagogy for elearning Course Management

13 Supporting Content Providers and Instructors Need to have a strong sense of support Training – WebCT “Boot Camp”, and advanced training sessions WebGroup mentor program WebGroup development support Need to have a strong sense of community Online “Designer’s Forum” User Groups “How To …” and CMS Documentation

14 Supporting Students Need to have a strong sense of procedural and technical support Helpdesk (Phone and Online) Passwords/Logins Procedural Support (access, technology, …) Enrollment Support Online FAQ’s Example Courses “How to take an Online Course” Help!

15 Supporting Instructors and Students Need to have a strong sense that the infrastructure (hardware and software systems such as the network, CMS, , …) is available 24 x 7 with minimal downtime Minimal interference from external technology (such as firewalls) that would prevent access to all content. IT needs to act like an ASP (Service Level Agreements)

16 Content Creation, Navigation, “Look and Feel” and Project Management Assignment of WebGroup mentor, SME and Instructor training (e.g. Boot Camp) Recommendations for organization of content (CMS dependent) Splash page (Instructor & Course Info) New course templates (content organization based to the type of course being developed)

17 The “Splash” Page Instructor Information Address Phone Office hours … Course Information Description Enrollment info Important dates

18 New Course Templates Recommended Content Elements (Tools) Syllabus, Calendar, Tech Overview, Discussion, , …, EoC Survey Recommended Ordering Recommended Naming Direct the “Creative Juices” toward the content development rather than the Navigation (link to Section 1 of BP doc)link to Section 1 of BP doc

19 Recommendations – Why?

20 Nuts and Bolts When content is placed on the web (within a CMS), file type DOES matter. Not everyone has Word, PowerPoint or Excel (link to Section 3 of BP doc)link to Section 3 of BP doc Not everyone is on a high speed cable modem Not everyone is on the outside of a firewall Not everyone is using the same browser Many think AOL IS the Internet

21 Every decision I make concerning the formatting of content will tend to eliminate some segment of the potential users from being able to access that content.

22 eLearning Pedagogy You don’t have to go from completely F2F to completely web-based in one move There are numerous intermediate positions Choice depends on “final” product We have 4 somewhat loosely bounded categories that we put courses into New pedagogical constructs don’t have to be reinvented for each new course (crafted) Map CMS “Tools” to elements of high quality online instruction

23 Four Developmental Categories Online Support for F2F Hybrid 1 Simultaneous Synchronous (F2F) and Asynchronous (Remote – web enabled) sections F2F captured, broadcast and archived No major changes to F2F delivery (except those that would be normal with online support)

24 Four Developmental Categories Hybrid 2 Simultaneous Synchronous (F2F) and Asynchronous (Remote – web enabled) sections F2F captured, broadcast and archived Major changes to F2F delivery Web Delivered

25 A Simple Pedagogy Content / Context / Practice / Assess Review content & context Practice Assess Read, view, listen, interact Self assessments, interactive exercises, practice problems, case study evaluations, … Quizzes, Essays, Discussion, Critiques, …

26 Pedagogies for Web-based Courses Link to Section 8 of BP doc Mapping CMS Tools to Elements of Instruction Link to Section 5 of BP doc Meaningful Assessments Link to Section 10 of BP doc Course Management Link to Section 6 of BP doc Link to Section 8 of BP doc Link to Section 5 of BP doc Link to Section 10 of BP doc Link to Section 6 of BP doc

27 Best Practices – a Summary Evolutionary not revolutionary Not every course should go directly from F2F to the completely web-based Not every course is suitable for completely web-based, but most if not all can benefit from web-based support Not every course has to have a different “look and feel”. Consistency IS important! Treat your Faculty and Students as Customers – Support, Support, Support

28 An Instructor’s View Mike Scheuermann Adjunct Assistant Professor

29 Distributed Learning … will be what we make it – will open up new avenues for student learning – will challenge students from multiple directions – will excite learners when orchestrated properly – will fulfill students in their quest for knowledge – will reward their academic pursuits – will enhance their career development – if students and educators are dedicated to the effort!

30 Distributed Learning … will be what we make it – will open up new avenues for student learning – will challenge students from multiple directions – will excite learners when orchestrated properly – will fulfill students in their quest for knowledge – will reward their academic pursuits – will enhance their career development – if students and educators are dedicated to the effort!

31 As Educators We Need to Craft: learning experiences that are exciting, fresh, and interactive learning that comes from a number of new directions approaches that will enhance, broaden, and facilitate student learning and instructor pedagogy courses that result from significant amounts of work, beyond traditional course delivery methods challenges that come from students’ heightened self-management component

32 As Educators We Need to Craft: learning experiences that are exciting, fresh, and interactive learning that comes from a number of new directions approaches that will enhance, broaden, and facilitate student learning and instructor pedagogy courses that result from significant amounts of work, beyond traditional course delivery methods challenges that come from students’ heightened self-management component

33 “Crafter” Skills and Abilities What will we need to be able to do? What will we need to be good at? What challenges await us? How can we educate effectively?

34 E-Learning Educators Need to Be Able to: Communicate Manage time Integrate Be flexible Collaborate Plan Organize Seek feedback Build learning communities Embrace the tools Utilize technology Use multiple methodologies Network Mentor colleagues Appreciate both the content and the context

35 E-Learning Educators Need to Be Able to: Communicate Manage time Integrate Be flexible Collaborate Plan Organize Seek feedback Build learning communities Embrace the tools Utilize technology Use multiple methodologies Network Mentor colleagues Appreciate both the content and the context

36 We Will Need to Be Good At: Technology Accepting multi-faceted challenges Dealing with advanced learning approaches Encouraging self-directed learning Thinking quickly / solving problems Dedicating ourselves to the course at hand Utilizing all of the available course features

37 We Will Need to Be Good At: Technology Accepting multi-faceted challenges Dealing with advanced learning approaches Encouraging self-directed learning Thinking quickly / solving problems Dedicating ourselves to the course at hand Utilizing all of the available course features

38 The Challenges We Face: Participating in the learning community Enabling self-direction and self-motivation Utilizing various courseware components Preparing to do significant amounts of work Crafting meaningful courses for students Interfacing with others Educating in an asynchronous environment

39 The Challenges We Face: Participating in the learning community Enabling self-direction and self-motivation Utilizing various courseware components Preparing to do significant amounts of work Crafting meaningful courses for students Interfacing with others Educating in an asynchronous environment

40 We Can Be Effective by Being: Multi-dimensional Effective time managers Highly organized, good planners Committed to the content and new approaches Willing to dedicate ourselves to the effort Dedicated to overcome “the separation” Convinced that learning will result

41 We Can Be Effective by Being: Multi-dimensional Effective time managers Highly organized, good planners Committed to the content and new approaches Willing to dedicate ourselves to the effort Dedicated to overcome “the separation” Convinced that learning will result

42 E-Learning Features: Orientation Courses Electronic Syllabus Synchronous chatroom sessions Asynchronous threaded discussions Electronic resource lists Document Sharing Audio clips / video clips capabilities Archived components / printed lectures

43 E-Learning Features: Orientation Courses Electronic Syllabus Synchronous chatroom sessions Asynchronous threaded discussions Electronic resource lists Document Sharing Audio clips / video clips capabilities Archived components / printed lectures

44 Start Your Checklist  Take any available orientation course(s)  Introduce yourself as the instructor  Craft the course electronic syllabus  Detail a significant course bibliography  Prepare / record audio clips and video clips  Include printable lectures / hyperlinks  Examine courseware capabilities  Plan your availability / asynchronous threaded discussions  Schedule your online synchronous chatroom sessions  Become your institution’s “educator behind the course”

45 The End Of a GOOD YEAR!

46 Q & A


Download ppt "Online Course Development: From an Art to a Craft John Morris Coordinator: Academic Technology Drexel University – Mike Scheuermann."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google