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Historic Supreme Court Cases Review. 1. Slaves could not sue in federal courts because they were considered property and not citizens. Congress could.

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Presentation on theme: "Historic Supreme Court Cases Review. 1. Slaves could not sue in federal courts because they were considered property and not citizens. Congress could."— Presentation transcript:

1 Historic Supreme Court Cases Review

2 1. Slaves could not sue in federal courts because they were considered property and not citizens. Congress could not force new states to be slave or free states it was a reserved power. Constitutional Issue: Reserved powers

3 2. Freedom of Speech could be limited during times of war if it presented a “clear and present danger” to the country. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of speech

4 3. Outlawed prayer in public schools because they violated the establishment clause. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of religion

5 4. School attendance laws violated freedom of religion by forcing Amish citizens to learn against their wills. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of religion

6 5. The death penalty is constitutional if it is used for a crime that fits the penalty and factors other than race should be used. Constitutional Issue: 8 th amendment; cruel and unusual punishment.

7 6. The death penalty is unconstitutional if it can not be proven that factors other than race were used. Constitutional Issue: 8 th amendment; cruel and unusual punishment

8 7. This case ruled that the judicial branch had the power to review a law to see if it was constitutional (judicial review) The constitutional issue: Judicial Review

9 8. Affirmative Action is constitutional for college admissions as long as race is not the only factor used for admission Constitutional Issue: 14 th amendment; equal protection of the law

10 9. Law officials must notify accused persons of their rights when they are taken into custody. Constitutional Issue: 5 th amendment; self- incrimination.

11 10. Declared that state laws requiring the separation of races was constitutional as long as the states provided “separate but equal” facilities. Constitutional Issue: Reserved Powers

12 11. Evidence obtained by law officials in “good faith” is still admissible (usable) in court even if a search warrant shouldn’t have been issued. Constitutional Issue: 4 th amendment – searches and seizures

13 12. Overturned Plessy v. Ferguson and therefore outlawed segregation in public schools. Constitutional Issue: 14 th amendment; equal protection of the laws.

14 13. State governments can not tax an agency of the federal government and the national bank is constitutional. Constitutional Issue: Supremacy Clause

15 14. School officials only have to have “reasonable cause” to search students suspected of crimes on school grounds and do not need a search warrant to do so. Constitutional Issue: 4 th amendment; searches and seizures

16 15. Student’s rights to freedom of speech can not be limited when they do not disrupt the learning process in schools. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of expression

17 16. States can not regulate interstate trade because it is a power given to the federal government by the Constitution. Constitutional Issue: Expressed powers, Supremacy Clause

18 17. Flag burning was constitutionally protected as a means of free expression. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of expression.

19 18. Freedom of assembly could not be dismissed as disturbing the peace in order to break-up a protest. 1 st amendment; freedom of assembly.

20 19.States did not have to provide an attorney in criminal cases unless the accused person was on trial for a capital crime or there were special circumstances, such as illiteracy. Constitutional Issue: 6 th amendment, right to an attorney

21 20. Freedom of religion was constitutionally protected, but religious practices could not break the law. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of religion.

22 21. The government can not limit freedom of the press for information that was given to newspapers voluntarily, if it does not violate national security. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of press

23 22. The government could limit the freedom of citizens during times of war. Therefore the prison camps for Japanese Americans did not violate the Constitution. Constitutional Issue: 5 th and 6 th amendments; Expressed powers

24 23. State laws barring abortion are unconstitutional that ban abortions prior to the time that the baby can live without the mother. Constitutional Issue: 9 th amendment; right to privacy.

25 24. States must follow the fourth amendment when gathering evidence and upheld the “exclusionary rule”, that evidence obtained illegally is not admissible in court. Constitutional Issue: 4 th amendment; searches and seizures

26 25. The president can not use “executive privilege” to protect himself, but only for matters that affect national security. Constitutional Issue: Checks and Balances

27 26. Law officials not only had to have a search warrant to enter a home, but evidence obtained without a warrant was inadmissible in court, the “exclusionary rule” Constitutional Issue: 4 th amendment; exclusionary rule.

28 27. States must provide an attorney in all criminal cases even if the accused can not afford one. Constitutional Issue: 6 th amendment; right to an attorney.

29 28. Schools do not violate the first amendment by controlling the content of school newspapers. 1 st amendment; freedom of the press

30 29. Students freedom of speech can be limited at school if it causes a disruption and when needed. Constitutional Issue: 1 st amendment; freedom of speech

31 1. Dred Scott vs. Sanford (1857) upload.wikimedia.orgwww.phschool.com

32 2. Schenk v. United States (1919)

33 3. Engel v. Vitale (1962) www2.maxwell.syr.edu

34 4. Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) fairhillchristianschool.org

35 5. Gregg v. Georgia (1976) whiteesworkshop.com/images/electric_c hair.bmp methink.files.wordpress.com/2007/11/ death-pen...

36 6. Furman v. Georgia (1972) gPf9K

37 7. Marbury v. Madison (1803)

38 8. Univ. of California v. Bakke (1978) ve%20action%20cartoon.jpg es/clown_cartoon.gif

39 9. Miranda v. Arizona (1966) gif crimpro/cartoon3.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.billofrightsinstitute.org/dnn/quiz/crimpro/cart oon.htm&h=329&w=289&sz=19&hl=en&start=8&usg=__Uc02gEIRq9ZRdFkj8vkOFCO P21o=&tbnid=Y6ej5CQAsjFXcM:&tbnh=119&tbnw=105&prev=/images%3Fq%3DGideo n%2Bv.%2BWainwright%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Dactive

40 10. Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) blect/lec02/plessy2.jpg tc.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/antebel lum/images/plessy.jpg

41 11. U.S. v. Leon (1984) cpr0038.gif /cpr0033.gif

42 12. Brown v. Board of Education (1954) n0002.gif

43 13. McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) ney.jpg

44 14. New Jersey v. TLO (1985) /march2007leb_img_23.jpg

45 15. Tinker v. Des Moines (1969) schema-root.org/region/americas/north_america arun.ampli5.org/.../02/college-discipline.jpg

46 16. Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

47 17. Texas v. Johnson (1989) amazon.com/images/I/51PP33KCVVL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

48 18. Gregory v. Chicago (1969)

49 19. Betts v. Brady (1942)

50 20. Reynolds v. U.S. (1879)

51 21. NY Times v. U.S. (1971)

52 22. Korematsu v. U.S. (1944)

53 23. Roe v. Wade (1973) p bx_400.jpg

54 24. Mapp v. Ohio (1961)

55 25. U.S. v. Nixon (1974) allsupremecourtcases.com/i/scc/img0083.jpg

56 26. Weeks v. United States (1914)

57 27. Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

58 28. Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier (1988)

59 29. Bethel v. Fraser (1986)


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