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How to Make a Simple Paragraph Paragraphs: the basic parts Topic If you Lead Off Then Follow Up Detail Sentence In Sequence Clincher Sentence General,

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Presentation on theme: "How to Make a Simple Paragraph Paragraphs: the basic parts Topic If you Lead Off Then Follow Up Detail Sentence In Sequence Clincher Sentence General,"— Presentation transcript:

1 How to Make a Simple Paragraph Paragraphs: the basic parts Topic If you Lead Off Then Follow Up Detail Sentence In Sequence Clincher Sentence General, Clueing, or Specific Paragraph Diagram What’s the Point? Don’t be so tense… Brainstorm/ Mind Map REWOT ? TOWERTHE THEME

2 Paragraphs have (5) basic parts Title- The subject of the paragraph Topic Sentence -usually first or second sentence it forms an Introduction Lead and follow up detail sentences in logical sequence Conclusion -usually the last sentence- called the clincher

3 Mind- and Concept-Mapping. A mind map is a diagram used to represent words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea (See example below).

4 The 5W’s Are an essential part of the TOWER diagram when writing. The first step is T Thinking. When considering the topic and looking for connections to creat subtopics Answering – the 5 w’s can help you Brainstorm: who (with literature – characterization) what (addresses plot) when (Setting and historical perspective) where (Setting and historical perspective) why (Motive and Conflict can be found here too!) There are other options too Consider the opposite of the topic (antithesis) Consider gender or age (if applicable) Consider assumptions and beliefs( versus fact) Another method that can work is “clustering.”

5 On your Paragraph Diagram, write your topic sentence in the space provided above! TOPIC T/A/G: Title/Author/Genre: TOPIC T/A/G: Title/Author/Genre: Remember to include the title author and genre when writing about literature or a text. Topic :

6 Lead-off sentences 1) Introduce a new detail to the reader. 2) Include a transition / sequence word to show the relationship between the new detail and the rest of the paragraph. Examples: The first reason, the most important element, the largest consideration, etc.

7 Follow-up Sentences 1) Follow the lead-off sentence with additional information about the detail. 2) You can cite a detail example or fact here! Use parenthesis or incorporate the source as a detail. You can write as many follow-up sentences as needed to convey information about the detail to be discussed.

8 Transition / Sequence These are structural words pointing to relationships among and between ideas. These words are used to indicate examples or application of thought and logic. Size Time Space Importance Chain-Link Concluding

9 Point of View Types of Point of View Third Person Point of View Here the narrator does not participate in the action of the story as one of the characters, but lets us know exactly how the characters feel. We learn about the characters through this outside voice. No Personal Feelings here! No references to the writer! DO NOT USE UNLESS DIRECTED BY THE TEACHER First Person Point of View In the first person point of view, the narrator does participate in the action of the story. When reading stories in the first person, we need to realize that what the narrator is recounting might not be the objective truth. We should question the trustworthiness of the accounting. AVOID THESE--- I, ME, WE, US, YOU etc.

10 TENSE 1) It is standard practice to use the present tense for literature– “for books never die.” 2) Maintain a consistent tense. Avoid switching from past to present: Incorrect: Othello was jealous of his wife because Iago tricks him into believing that Desdomona is unfaithful and was in love with Cassio. Correct: Othello is jealous of his wife because Iago tricks him into believing that Desdomona is unfaithful and is in love with Cassio.

11 Five parts of a detail sentence: They must include a transition if it introduces a new detail. BE SPECIFIC. Avoid generalities and vague references to the topic. Avoid making empty statements as given in the following example: There is a lot of symbolism in ‘The Story of an Hour.’ It is really effective, and it is crucial to the story line and theme. Don’t stop there. Present specific examples: The symbolism in ‘The Story of an Hour’ is very effective and also crucial to the story line and theme. The sky that Mrs. Mallard looks at through the open window speaks volumes, and it symbolizes her new lease on life. The ‘patches of blue sky showing here and there through the clouds’ indicate new opportunities and experiences and feelings she will have now that the chains of nineteenth century wedlock are lifted.

12 Clincher Sentences Similar to topic sentences but form the conclusion of the paragraph. Usually the last sentence in the paragraph. Closes the paragraph. Names the main idea of the paragraph. Sometimes summarizes or names the details of the paragraph. Is different from the topic sentence (should use different words than the topic sentence). Sometimes they start with a concluding transition (a word or group of words that tell the reader that you are finishing something.)

13 Three types of Clincher Sentences General-summarizes only the main idea of a paragraph, it may make the reader think more about the topic. Clueing-names the main idea and ties the details together with a clue word (same clue words we used earlier in the clueing topic sentence). Specific-names the main idea, names the specific details that were covered in the paragraph order.

14 Three types of Clincher Sentences General-summarizes only the main idea of a paragraph, it may make the reader think more about the topic. Clueing-names the main idea and ties the details together with a clue word (same clue words we used earlier in the clueing topic sentence). Specific-names the main idea, names the specific details that were covered in the paragraph order.

15 Paragraph Diagram TITLE ______________ LO___________________________________________________________ FU ___________________________________________________________ Literary Device: DETAILS Topic : Clincher Sequence: LO___________________________________________________________ FU ___________________________________________________________ Literary Device: LO___________________________________________________________ FU ___________________________________________________________ Literary Device: Sequence:

16 Size Transitions The largest Larger than The smallest The small-sized The tallest The next largest Equal to The next smallest The medium-sized The shortest The smallest Smaller than The largest The largest-sized

17 Time Transitions First, Now At the beginning of Thereafter, By this time Before Then, Soon In the middle of Presently, At the same time In the meantime Next, Then At the end of After a short time, At that instant Meanwhile At last, Later Thereafter, Immediately, During Simultaneously, Afterwards First, In the morning, Yesterday, The first Second, Before noon, Today, A more recent Third, In the afternoon, Tomorrow The most recent Finally, In the evening, The day after tomorrow, In the past, The next day, This year, The earliest In the present, Two weeks later, Next year, The next earliest In the future, Six months later, In the next few years The most recent

18 Space Transitions behind on the edge of beside in front of west of high over toward around facing east of against under throughout near in back of north of alongside below to the right of side by side in the center south of ahead of beneath to the left of close to inside at the here low down on top of next to outside in there on the bottom at the top down at the end of on beyond on the corner by up between above farther on

19 Importance Transitions The best The most important The first The best The next best Equally important More important than The next best The least best The next important Most important The worst The least important

20 Chain-Link Transitions On the one hand, One example of In the first place, In other words, The first On the other hand, For instance, In the second place, In fact, The second Another example In the third place, Also, The third Again, A further example Besides, For another example, Moreover, For example, One Because First, Another Since Second, Still another further As Third, In addition, Further, Still, Specifically In the same way, Furthermore, While More specifically In fact, Instead In particular, The opposite of _is_ Additionally, On the contrary side Lastly, The last Indeed, As a result, To the contrary, Similar to s_ Last Although Consequently, In contrast, Another similar _is_ Even though Naturally In spite of Likewise, Nevertheless, Even if After all, Despite the Similarly, Nonetheless, A dissimilar _is_

21 Concluding Transitions To conclude In sum, To sum up As you can see, In conclusion, In brief, To summarize, As a result, In summary, In short, Therefore, Finally,


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