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SHARING ASSET INFORMATION STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT NSWHG Jan 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "SHARING ASSET INFORMATION STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT NSWHG Jan 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 SHARING ASSET INFORMATION STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT NSWHG Jan 2007

2 What would we like to achieve today? 1.Your support for NUAG, its Vision, its Aims and its plans, based on a fuller understanding. 2.Your support for the key findings and recommendations of the review of current practice and future requirements. 3.A commitment to communicate positively NUAG’s Vision and Aims, and the key findings and recommendations of the review of current practice and future requirements. 4.An agreed feedback process.

3 A reminder of the challenges facing us all

4 Utilities are the UK’s Veins and Arteries … Communications Gas Oil/Petroleum Sewerage Road drainage Power Steam Water District heating Street lighting Traffic control

5 …but we know very little about where they are

6 Meeting the challenges

7 An Overview MAKING THE BEST OF WHAT WE HAVE CURRENTLY IMPROVED FUTURE SURFACE-BASED TECHNIQUES BELOW GROUND SURVEY TECHNIQUES FUTURE POSSIBILITIES AND DEVELOPMENTS Needs, best practice, Framework, models, approaches Opportunities for continuous improvement Exchange of ideas Exchange of ideas Exchange of ideas Needs, best practice, framework, models, approach Opportunities for continuous improvement Needs, best practice, framework, models, approach Opportunities for radical, step-change improvement

8 The ‘Buried Assets Jigsaw’ VISTA MTU TMA ICE BSWG NUAG Multi sensor technology to find asset A common container to hold and manipulate in 3D How to exchange in a common manner What should be made available: Who, what, where Several initiatives working together to a common goal Driver for better data integration

9 Utility and Highways stakeholders Trials and pilot systems The UKWIR Programme ICE/ICES Buried Services Working Group (BSWG) Mapping the Underworld (MTU) NJUG Ltd, HAUC reports & recommendations European Projects GIGA, ORFEUS… VISTA Smart Pipes GPR in Sewers Department for Transport AMTEC report and TMA working groups Initiatives working together to a common goal

10 The ‘Missing Piece’ VISTA MTU TMA ICE BSWG NUAG Multi sensor technology to find asset A common container to hold and manipulate in 3D How to exchange in a common manner What should be made available: Who, what, where Several initiatives working together to a common goal Driver for better data integration

11 The National Underground Assets Group

12 Context NUAGHAUC Working Groups Working Groups DfT Vision Standards Technical Expertise Code of Practice Regulations

13 NUAG – Our Aims The aims of the Group are: To support the Department for Transport in achieving the relevant Traffic Management Act targets by: Delivering agreed data definitions, data standards, protocols and processes, and a timetable for their implementation, leading to the most effective and efficient means of recording, storing, sharing and displaying information on underground assets, and appropriate associated above ground assets. Ensuring that everything is in place to enable the successful delivery of the Vision. To inform and represent the wider stakeholder community.

14 NUAG Members James Brayshaw Institution of Civil Engineers Institution of Civil Engineering Surveyors Mike Farrimond UK Water Industry Research Ray Gercans Department for Transport Les Guest National Joint Utilities Group Marc Hobell Ordnance Survey Nigel Mason Association for Geographical Information Frank O’Dwyer County Surveyors’ Society Dave Turnbull Highways Authorities & Utilities Committee Andrew Jackson Pipeline Industries Guild

15 All information on underground assets, and appropriate associated above ground assets, will be shared between stakeholders in a consistent way, on demand. THE NUAG VISION

16 CAPTURE ASSET DATA RECORD ASSET DATA STORE ASSET DATA SHARE ASSET DATA DISPLAY ASSET INFORMATION USE ASSET INFORMATION SCOPE OF THE WORK

17 A two phase approach

18 Processes is used as a generic term to cover all definitions, standards, protocols and processes, with associated measurement and management systems, documentation, training material and support systems. Approach is used as a generic term to cover technologies, with associated measurement and management systems, documentation, training material and support systems. Elements of a Plan to deliver The Vision

19 A more technically skilled workforce More effective technology Methodologies, standards and best practice Improved communications and co- operation Better understanding of life cycle costs COMPLETING THE JIGSAW… Reduced disruption and delay Reduced risk of third party damage Reduced risk of abortive costs Improved relations with regulators More options for legislation to reduce congestion Reduced waste and reinstatement LEADING TO… RESULTING IN Reduced direct, indirect, social and environmental costs More sustainable construction Improved health and safety More economic maintenance Improved image of organisations Public confidence in a more effective street works process Proven methods and technologies to exploit in home and overseas markets Reduced airborne and noise pollution Reduced congestion WILL DELIVER… Reduced time to locate underground assets More effective data sharing Increased use of no-dig and trenchless technology Reduced time to install or maintain underground assets Better understanding of costs and benefits of data collection and sharing More accurate records Improved planning data

20 Capturing, recording, storing and sharing underground asset information A review of current practice and future requirements September 2006

21 Working Group

22 Process Questionnaire based on 2003 DfT HAUC Code of Practice: –Qualitative element –Quantitative element Representative sample of utilities and highways Face-to-face interviews (wherever possible)

23 Current Practice – the headlines Significant variation between different organisations’ practices. Lack of a mandatory code a major cause of variation. Drainage records a particular challenge.

24 Future Plans – the headlines Variations in organisations’ future plans. Trend appears to be towards electronic GPS-based capture, electronic GIS-based storage and web-based sharing.

25 Conclusions 1.Significant variations exist in practices, approaches, attitudes and emphases, within and between utilities and highways, for the recording, storing and sharing of underground asset information, leading to, inter alia: variable accuracy; incomplete records; a wide range of map bases; excessive timescales and inconsistent approaches to third party and legacy data.

26 2.The lack of a statutory-based Code of Practice is seen as a key contributor to the current position. 3.There is strong support across utilities and highways sectors for a change to a more effective standardised approach and mandatory Code of Practice. 4.There are likely to be cost and resource issues associated with the deployment of a new Code. Conclusions

27 5.Unless a more consistent and compatible approach is employed to recording, storing and sharing asset record information, the possibility of achieving any future anticipated benefits of new technology will be threatened, and the technology- based aspirations of the Traffic Management Act are likely to be compromised. Conclusions

28 Recommendations

29 1.A revised Records Code of Practice must be developed and deployed on a mandatory basis. 2.A mandatory national standard high-level framework, with effective ownership and management, for capturing, recording, storing and sharing buried asset information must be in place to enable the effective deployment of the revised Records Code of Practice. To achieve the targets set out in the Traffic Management Act, NUAG recommends that:

30 3.Each utility and highways organisation must have clearly-defined processes compatible with the national standard framework, with effective ownership and management, for the implementation and use of revised Records Code, and achievement of the Code’s standards.

31 4.The revised Code of Practice must include a set of minimum standards to be achieved, as follows: a.All below ground assets must be recorded, together with associated above ground assets. b.Asset data must be captured during all types of work: planned, urgent and emergency. (Planned and immediate). c.Data must be captured and recorded for assets in any location. d.Data must be recorded for all new, replacement, amended or abandoned assets.

32 4.The revised Code of Practice must include a set of minimum standards to be achieved, as follows: e.All previously-unrecorded existing assets, belonging to the organisation carrying out the work, should be recorded if found during work. f.Any unidentified third party asset found in the course of work must be captured, and recorded as an Unidentified Buried Object (UBO), by the organisation finding it. g.Any historical discrepancies between recorded and actual data found during work should be reported to the asset’s owner, including third parties.

33 4.The revised Code of Practice must include a set of minimum standards to be achieved, as follows: h.Attributes that must be captured are: location (x and y); top of asset (z); diameter (including any changes); material (including any changes), and pipe or cable run. i.Asset data must be captured and recorded at a minimum standard of accuracy of +/- 100 mm in x, y and z dimensions. j.Location data must be recorded using relative and absolute referencing. k.All geospatial data must be recorded using an agreed framework and agreed scales (DNF).

34 4.The revised Code of Practice must include a set of minimum standards to be achieved, as follows: l.Asset data must be available for external inspection within one month of capture. m.Record information must be made available in electronic form through a web-based service. n.Each organisation is responsible for managing their responses to requests for record information.

35 5.The revised Code of Practice must include standard data definitions and data standards. 6.There must be an annual review process to measure performance against the Code’s standards, leading to the deployment of appropriate improved minimum standards.

36 7.Any resource and cost implications associated with the new Code must be managed effectively to ensure a successful deployment. 8.The national high level standard framework and the revised Records Code must be fully implemented within a mandatory timetable.

37 We need a road map to get us from where we are now … …to where we want to be Our recommendations will help us start the journey NOW

38 And finally: We believe there is a clear need to change the way we do things We believe there are major benefits available We believe that successful implementation of our recommendations will help to enable change We recognise that change will not happen overnight We need the active support of everyone involved

39

40 THANK YOU


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