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Fun Facts About Solar  It takes about 8 minutes for energy from the sun to reach Earth  Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth –

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Presentation on theme: "Fun Facts About Solar  It takes about 8 minutes for energy from the sun to reach Earth  Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth –"— Presentation transcript:

1 Fun Facts About Solar  It takes about 8 minutes for energy from the sun to reach Earth  Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on earth – 173,000 terawatts of solar energy strikes the Earth continuously. That's more than 10,000 times the world's total energy use.  Total U.S. installations may reach 3,300 megawatts this year – putting the country on track to be the fourth largest solar market in the world.

2 Solar Power

3 The Big Picture  Unit 3: Solar Power  1.1 History & Uses  1.2 Passive  1.3 Active  Power Transmission & Impacts

4 Essential Questions (pt 1)  What is solar power?  What is the electromagnetic spectrum and how is it related to temperature?

5 Essential Questions (pt 2)  What is active solar energy and how can it be used?  What is passive solar energy and how can it be used?  How do solar cells work?

6 Essential Questions (pt 3)  How is electricity generated from solar energy transformed for use in the home?  What are the socio- environmental impacts of using solar energy?

7 How much energy is emitted by our Sun? The sun produces about 3.8 x kW of energy Only one one-billionth of that reaches Earth 34% of what reaches Earth is reflected by clouds …so how much Solar Energy reaches the Earth??? 250 Trillion Kilowatts!!! In 2008, 144 Trillion kWh were consumed on Earth. More solar energy reaches the Earth in 1 HOUR than is consumed by us in 1 YEAR

8 How much energy is emitted by our Sun? …so there’s a lot of energy emitted by our Sun. What of it? Well, we can use it to generate power or heat our homes. That’s what! Solar Power!!!

9 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1882 Baltimore Polytechnic Institute was founded 1 st hydroelectric powerplant on Fox River in Appleton, Wisconsin % of all electricity produced globally comes from hydropower 1883

10 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun.

11 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun.

12 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers.

13 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers Baltimore inventor Clarence Kemp patented the first commercial solar water heater. For more information on the water heater, see the tory_solarthermal.html California Solar Center Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson develop the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs—the first solar cell capable of converting enough of the sun’s energy into power to run everyday electrical equipment Silicon Sensors, Inc., of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is founded. It starts producing selenium and silicon photovoltaic cells The Odeillo solar furnace in France was constructed, using an 8-story parabolic mirror The U.S. Department of Energy, along with an industry consortium, begins operating Solar One, a 10- megawatt central-receiver demonstration project Cumulative worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity reaches 1000 megawatts Home Depot begins selling residential solar power systems in California. A year later it expands sales to include 61 stores nationwide.

14 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers Baltimore inventor Clarence Kemp patented the first commercial solar water heater. For more information on the water heater, see the tory_solarthermal.html California Solar Center Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson develop the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs—the first solar cell capable of converting enough of the sun’s energy into power to run everyday electrical equipment Silicon Sensors, Inc., of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is founded. It starts producing selenium and silicon photovoltaic cells The Odeillo solar furnace in France was constructed, using an 8-story parabolic mirror The U.S. Department of Energy, along with an industry consortium, begins operating Solar One, a 10- megawatt central-receiver demonstration project Cumulative worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity reaches 1000 megawatts Home Depot begins selling residential solar power systems in California. A year later it expands sales to include 61 stores nationwide.

15 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers Baltimore inventor Clarence Kemp patented the first commercial solar water heater. For more information on the water heater, see the tory_solarthermal.html California Solar Center Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson develop the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs—the first solar cell capable of converting enough of the sun’s energy into power to run everyday electrical equipment Silicon Sensors, Inc., of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is founded. It starts producing selenium and silicon photovoltaic cells The Odeillo solar furnace in France was constructed, using an 8-story parabolic mirror The U.S. Department of Energy, along with an industry consortium, begins operating Solar One, a 10- megawatt central-receiver demonstration project Cumulative worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity reaches 1000 megawatts Home Depot begins selling residential solar power systems in California. A year later it expands sales to include 61 stores nationwide.

16 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers Baltimore inventor Clarence Kemp patented the first commercial solar water heater. For more information on the water heater, see the tory_solarthermal.html California Solar Center Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson develop the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs—the first solar cell capable of converting enough of the sun’s energy into power to run everyday electrical equipment Silicon Sensors, Inc., of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is founded. It starts producing selenium and silicon photovoltaic cells The Odeillo solar furnace in France was constructed, using an 8-story parabolic mirror The U.S. Department of Energy, along with an industry consortium, begins operating Solar One, a 10- megawatt central-receiver demonstration project Cumulative worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity reaches 1000 megawatts Home Depot begins selling residential solar power systems in California. A year later it expands sales to include 61 stores nationwide.

17 History of Solar Power 7 th Century BC2 nd Century BC Magnifying glass used to concentrate sun’s rays to make fire and to burn ants. As early as 212 BC, the Greek scientist, Archimedes, used the reflective properties of bronze shields to focus sunlight and to set fire to wooden ships from the Roman Empire which were besieging Syracuse. (Although no proof of such a feat exists, the Greek navy recreated the experiment in 1973 and successfully set fire to a wooden boat at a distance of 50 meters.) 1 st – 4 th Century AD The famous Roman bathhouses in the first to fourth centuries A.D. had large south facing windows to let in the sun’s warmth AD Ancestors of Pueblo people called Anasazi in North America live in south-facing cliff dwellings that capture the winter sun Swiss scientist Horace de Saussure was credited with building the world’s first solar collector French scientist Edmond Becquerel discovers the photovoltaic effect while experimenting with an electrolytic cell made up of two metal electrodes placed in an electricity-conducting solution—electricity- generation increased when exposed to light William Grylls Adams and Richard Evans Day discover that selenium produces electricity when exposed to light. Although selenium solar cells failed to convert enough sunlight to power electrical equipment, they proved that a solid material could change light into electricity without heat or moving parts Charles Fritts, an American inventor, described the first solar cells made from selenium wafers Baltimore inventor Clarence Kemp patented the first commercial solar water heater. For more information on the water heater, see the tory_solarthermal.html California Solar Center Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson develop the silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell at Bell Labs—the first solar cell capable of converting enough of the sun’s energy into power to run everyday electrical equipment Silicon Sensors, Inc., of Dodgeville, Wisconsin, is founded. It starts producing selenium and silicon photovoltaic cells The Odeillo solar furnace in France was constructed, using an 8-story parabolic mirror The U.S. Department of Energy, along with an industry consortium, begins operating Solar One, a 10- megawatt central-receiver demonstration project Cumulative worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity reaches 1000 megawatts Home Depot begins selling residential solar power systems in California. A year later it expands sales to include 61 stores nationwide.

18 What’s Coming Up?  The Electromagnetic Spectrum  Passive Solar Energy  Active Solar Energy  Power Transmission  Impacts on Environment/Society


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