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AALL 2011 Keeping it Real! Paraphrasing John Dewey: We learn what we do It is essential to have a ‘real’ question “How we Think” 1910 John Hilsdon, University.

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Presentation on theme: "AALL 2011 Keeping it Real! Paraphrasing John Dewey: We learn what we do It is essential to have a ‘real’ question “How we Think” 1910 John Hilsdon, University."— Presentation transcript:

1 AALL 2011 Keeping it Real! Paraphrasing John Dewey: We learn what we do It is essential to have a ‘real’ question “How we Think” 1910 John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

2 Making Learning Real! who am I

3 John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011 Remember then: there is only one time that is important - now! It is the most important time because it is the only time when we have any power. Leo Tolstoy "Three Questions" What now?

4 What is learning? ... … participation in a meaningful activity leading to a change in identity (Wenger, 1998) ... but what about transformatory activity?  (Fuller et al, 2007) John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

5 Paraphrasing Bakhtin: Meaning arises in dialogue between addressor, addressee and utterance in the context of situation and of culture: “The speaker is not the biblical Adam, dealing only with virgin and still unnamed objects, giving them names for the first time.” Bakhtin, 1986:93

6 listenerspeaker observer Triads John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

7 Is three a ‘magic number’?  I’ve been experimenting with the use of a structured group activity called 'triads‘; it involves participants working in groups of three and an explicit focus on three roles. In using the exercise learners / participants occupy each role in turn. These roles are: 'speaker', 'listener' and 'observer'. I hope you will be able to take away and try the activity for supporting ‘active learning’ - to make best use of classroom time for effective and authentic participation in learning.  If you are interested, I invite you to try the activity in your own context. I will undertake share subsequent findings on uses of the ‘triads’ model with those who express interest. Contact me at John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

8 Speaker rôle express relevant content / view / understanding offer clarification / reformulate seek feedback John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

9 Listener rôle give full attention check understanding / seek clarification give feedback John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

10 Observer rôle facilitate overall process (e.g. timekeeping; feedback) make notes of significant points / connections (N.B. legibly – to give to speaker!) offer further questions, insights or suggestions after listener’s feedback John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

11 Triad work: suggested model 1) allocate rôles 2) speaker/listener carry out timed task 3) observer facilitates feedback and debrief: asks speaker to comment on experience asks listener to comment on experience offers own comments / shares notes and chance for final feedback from others John Hilsdon, University of Plymouth 2011

12 References Dewey, J. (1938) Experience and Education. New York: Kappa Delta Fuller, Alison (2007) Critiquing theories of learning and communities of practice. In Hughes, Jason; Jewson, Nick; and Unwin, Lorna (Eds) (2007) Communities of Practice: Critical Perspectives. London: Routledge Heron J. (1999) The Complete Facilitator's Handbook London: Kogan Page Shuell, T. (1986) ‘Cognitive conceptions of learning’ Review of Educational Research 56 pp Tolstoy, L. (2008) What Men Live By & Other Tales: Stories by Tolstoy. Arc Manor. Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of Practice.


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