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Oct. 1998 July 2009 2001 2008 Monitoring Shoreline Change Geological Survey of Canada, Atlantic (GSCA) Bob Taylor, Dartmouth NS.

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Presentation on theme: "Oct. 1998 July 2009 2001 2008 Monitoring Shoreline Change Geological Survey of Canada, Atlantic (GSCA) Bob Taylor, Dartmouth NS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Oct July Monitoring Shoreline Change Geological Survey of Canada, Atlantic (GSCA) Bob Taylor, Dartmouth NS

2 Historical framework for examining shoreline change in the Gulf of St Lawrence Geogr. Branch. 1959, Gosselin, 1972, LRIS, 1988

3 Shoreline sites Monitored by GSCA Time frame: Shore measurements Aerial video surveys: (10 sites ) (12 sites) (5 sites ) 302 sites Atlantic Canada 27 sites in Southern Gulf

4 Objectives: repetitive survey and photographic measurements at representative shore sites Define natural phases and duration of shoreline change, ie. erosion, stability and accretion. Document impact of storms and shoreline resilience to these events. (flooding, landward migration). Document human activities and impacts on shoreline stability. Develop a baseline / index of “typical” types and rates of shoreline change for future comparison.

5 Dune Building Phase High tide level ocean dune ridges Waterside Beach NS Storm Impacts: wave runup, dune erosion (Dec. 2004)

6 Top Cliff Retreat : glacial deposits only vs on rock LocationNo. of Years Mean Loss (m) Max. Loss (m) Retreat Rate (m/yr) Pleasant Bay Caribou Broad Cove Cape John Geogr. Branch: (1930s-1960) 0.18 to 0.4m/yr Gosselin: (1930s-1970) 0.15 to 0.6m/yr

7 Long -Term Beach Recovery from commercial sediment extraction Belfry Beach, Cape Breton Island

8 Field Measurements vs Remote Sensing ocean Shore cliff New technology – larger areas covered but may not include local area suitable for rock shores provides a rate of net change over set time intervals Misses interim period and timing of changes Similar mean rates of retreat 0.4 m/yr yet variable over time –max rate?

9 1.People often perceive shoreline erosion as much greater than it is in reality (long term) - result of negative media and people see the worst in crisis situations -demand remedial action immediately. - shorelines can respond and repair themselves naturally. 2. Decisions about shoreline repairs are often made at time of crisis, no time for consultation of monitoring results. -plans should be made earlier in a proactive mode. Thoughts for Discussion 3. News is short (days to months +anniv), Memory is longer (10-15 yrs); and Interest is cyclic (25-30 yrs).

10 2. There is no one agency monitoring and archiving long term shoreline changes (physical) and no long term baseline references to evaluate magnitude of shoreline responses. 1. In past - Field monitoring lasted months to ~ 3 years, (university or community) continuity often broken and information not archived nor easily accessible in time. More Thoughts for Discussion Photo C. Currie

11 4. GIS and GPS technology and satellite remote sensing will be the way of the future but need to maintain the "feel" and understanding of why shoreline changes are occurring. -Shediac and Clyde River examples Even More No one agency assessing the impacts of shore protection structures which would improve future decisions and advice. -Different attitudes to shore protection structures evolve with time, eg, groynes. -scale of human activity at coast unanticipated. Photo EAC

12 Community Strength - local knowledge & drive. Document local conditions pertinent to their geographic area 2. Log date of storm events –flood levels and extent from rivers, waves or storm sewers. 3. Photo, mark and log:- wave run-up limits, dune and cliff retreat, washover channels cut into dunes, opening and closing of tidal channels. 4. Repetitive photos from established locations -at set interval and after storms (need same person / camera specs used). 1.Establish key locations (and maintain shoreline markers) for repetitive surveys.

13 Community Strength – proximity & concern. 5. Note significant changes in vegetation limits, sediment levels at structures or human infrastructure in shore zone. 6.Alert provincial/ federal agencies about physical changes and need to resurvey. Lobby for support and results.


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