Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Evidence-Based Interventions to Improve Quality of Life in Dementia Rebecca G. Logsdon, PhD.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Evidence-Based Interventions to Improve Quality of Life in Dementia Rebecca G. Logsdon, PhD."— Presentation transcript:

1 Evidence-Based Interventions to Improve Quality of Life in Dementia Rebecca G. Logsdon, PhD

2 Research Funding National Institute on Aging AG13757, AG10845, AG05136, and AG14777 Alzheimer’s Association FSA , IIRG Administration on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease Grants to States Northwest Research Group on Aging Linda Teri, Rebecca Logsdon, Sue McCurry, Kenneth Pike, David LaFazia, Amy Moore, June van Leynseele Cathy Blackburn, Cat Olcott

3 Quality of Life Quality of life for older adults with chronic illness: a sense of well-being, satisfaction with life, and self- esteem, accomplished through the care received, the accomplishment of desired goals, and the ability to exercise a satisfactory degree of control over one’s life.

4 Quality of Life for Individuals with Dementia  Sense of well-being Absence of clinical depression and excessive anxiety Freedom from physical pain Safety and security  Satisfaction with life Preferred living arrangements Engagement in meaningful and pleasant activities Participation in family and social activities  Self-esteem Recognition of contributions Respect from others

5 Quality of Life for Individuals with Dementia  Sense of well-being Absence of clinical depression and excessive anxiety Freedom from physical pain Safety and security  Satisfaction with life Preferred living arrangements Engagement in meaningful and pleasant activities Participation in family and social activities  Self-esteem Recognition of contributions Respect from others

6 Quality of Life for Individuals with Dementia  Sense of well-being Absence of clinical depression and excessive anxiety Freedom from physical pain Safety and security  Satisfaction with life Preferred living arrangements Engagement in meaningful and pleasant activities Participation in family and social activities  Self-esteem Recognition of contributions Respect from others

7 Quality of Life  Care received Appropriate level of assistance Provided in ways acceptable to the care recipient  Achievement of desired goals Recognition of personal preferences Individualized care to accomplish individualized needs  Control over one’s life Participation in decision-making Freedom to choose from acceptable alternatives

8 Quality of Life  Care received Appropriate level of assistance Provided in ways acceptable to the care recipient  Achievement of desired goals Recognition of personal preferences Individualized care to accomplish individualized needs  Control over one’s life Participation in decision-making Freedom to choose from acceptable alternatives

9 Quality of Life  Care received Appropriate level of assistance Provided in ways acceptable to the care recipient  Achievement of desired goals Recognition of personal preferences Individualized care to accomplish individualized needs  Control over one’s life Participation in decision-making Freedom to choose from acceptable alternatives

10 QOL & Psychosocial Intervention: RCT Evidence Base Maximize social and ADL function Dooley, 2004; Gitlin, 2001, 03, 05; Graff, 2006; Lowenstein, 2004 Spector, 2003; Tarraga, 2006 Treat depressive symptoms and encourage pleasant activities Teri, 1997, 2005; Gerdner, 1996, 2002; Huang, 2003 Lichtenberg, 2006; Logsdon, 2006 Improve or maintain physical mobility Lazowski, 1999; Littbrand, 2006; Rolland, 2007 (NH) Teri, 2003; Logsdon, 2005 Reduce caregiver burden and depression Gallagher-Thompson, 1994, 2000, 07; Schulz, 2003, 05 Mittelman, 1995, 2004; Teri, 2005

11 RDAD: Reducing Disability in Alzheimer’s Disease Teri L, Gibbons LE, McCurry SM, Logsdon RG, Buchner D, Barlow W, Kukull W, LaCroix A, McCormick W, Larson E. (2003) Exercise plus behavior management in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: A controlled clinical trial. JAMA, 290(15); Funded by the National Institute on Aging AG10845 and AG14777  Active treatment: ● Home-based exercise – strength, balance, endurance ● B ehavior therapy – communication, problem-solving  Control: ● Routine Medical Care  Therapists: Master’s level home health providers (SW & PT)  12-week treatment duration, monthly follow-up 4 months  MMSE 0 to 29; Mean = 17  Assessments at baseline, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months

12 Benefits of Physical Activity for Individuals with Dementia Improves Strength and Mobility Lazowski, et al, 1999 Arkin, et al, 2003 Hageman, et al, 2002 Rolland, et al, 2000 Reduces Depression Teri, et al, 2004 Decreases Behavioral Disturbances Rolland, et al, 2000 Teri, et al, 2004 May Mitigate Cognitive Decline Rolland, et al, 2000 Emery, et al, 1998, 2003

13 Challenges of Exercise for Individuals with Dementia Reluctance to try new activities Difficulty learning & remembering to do exercises Inability to exercise independently due to safety concerns Family caregivers lack knowledge about exercise, already burdened by daily tasks, may be physically frail

14 RDAD Treatment Protocol 12-week program Delivered by community home health providers (physical therapist or social worker) Exercise Aerobic/endurance activities (walking) Strength Balance Flexibility Problem-solving Education about AD Intervening with behavioral problems Enhance caregiver resources and skills

15 Change in Percent of Subjects Exercising 60+ Minutes a Week ITT: Pre-Post <.01 Community-residing AD patients Mean Age = 78 Mean MMSE = 17 56% exercising 60+ minutes at baseline

16 RDAD Outcomes SF-36 Role Functioning ITT: Pre-Post p <.01 HDRS, Pts >6 on Cornell at baseline ITT: Pre-Post p <.05 Longitudinal p =.05

17 Change in Behavior Reasons for residential placement over 24-month follow-up

18 STAR-C: Caregiver Support Teri L, McCurry SM, Logsdon RG, & Gibbons LE. (2005). Training community consultants to help family members improve dementia care: A randomized controlled trial. The Gerontologist, 45(6), Funding: Alzheimer’s Association Pioneer Grant P  Active treatment: ● Seattle Protocols – communication, problem solving, pleasant events  Control: ● Routine medical care  Caregiving consultants: Master’s-level mental health counselors  8 weekly sessions, monthly phone calls 4 months  MMSE 0-28; Mean = 14  Assessments at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months

19 STAR Caregivers 8 weekly in-home caregiver counseling sessions Communication, problem-solving, pleasant events Target behaviors agitation, anxiety, depression Provided by master’s level caregiving consultants Companion for person with dementia if needed Training, ongoing supervision, and weekly monitoring of adherence to protocol by geropsychologists

20 ABCs and Problem-Solving Problem behaviors can interfere with your ability to care for a person with dementia and their ability to enjoy life Understanding dementia-related behaviors requires observation of the ABCs: Activators, Behaviors, and Consequences You can change a problem behavior by preventing it, or stopping it once it occurs

21 gram. The ABC Problem Solving Plan Where can you break the chain of events???

22 Promoting Pleasant Events  Individuals with dementia retain many skills despite cognitive impairments.  Interpersonal relationships are very important, and are fostered by shared pleasant activities.  Caregiver depression and burden may be lessened by focusing on positive, rather than negative interactions.

23 Identify and Re-introduce Pleasant Activities  What did the person enjoy in the past?  What does he/she enjoy now?  How can tasks be modified to accommodate current abilities?  Who is available to help with these activities?

24 CESD STAR-C Outcomes Baseline Post-Treatment Follow up Pre-Post p<.05 Longitudinal p<.02

25 Early Stage Support Groups Logsdon RG, McCurry SM, & Teri L (2005). Time limited support groups for individuals with early stage dementia and their care partners. Clinical Gerontologist, 30(2), Funding: Alzheimer’s Association; R Logsdon, PI  Active treatment: ● Early Stage Memory Loss seminar program  Control: ● Delayed treatment  Support Group Facilitators: Master’s level social workers  9 weekly sessions, participant and care partner attend together  MMSE 18-30; Mean = 24  Assessments at baseline and post treatment (2 months)

26 Early Stage Memory Loss Seminars  Groups planned and run by the Alzheimer’s Association Chapter  Individuals with early stage dementia and care partners attend together  Didactic Content: Everyone together, speaker or facilitator-led information  Discussion, Questions, Support: Participants and Care partners split up into two groups

27 Early Stage Memory Loss Outcomes For the Person with Memory Loss Improved Social Functioning (p <.05) Decreased Family Conflict (p <.05) Decreased Depression (p <.01) Improved Quality of Life (p <.01) For the Care Partner Decreased Distress about Problem Behaviors (p<.05)

28 Benefits of Early Stage Groups Logsdon, et al, 2005 (Clinical Gerontologist)

29 Take Home Messages from Research  Quality of life as perceived by the person with dementia does not necessarily decline due to memory loss or cognitive decline.  Quality of life is strongly influenced by mood.  Mood is influenced by pleasant activities, exercise, and social support.  Family members, friends, and other caregivers can significantly impact QOL for individuals with dementia.  What’s good for the person with dementia is good for the caregiver.

30 AoA Sponsored Evidence-Based Translation of These Interventions RDAD  Ohio: Community-based investigation  Washington State: Memory Care & Wellness Program in Adult Day Centers STAR-C  New Mexico  Oregon Technical Support: Manuals, Materials, Measures Training: For Planners, Evaluators, & Direct Care Providers Fidelity Monitoring: Ongoing Supervision, Consultation Technical Support: Manuals, Materials, Measures Training: For Planners, Evaluators, & Direct Care Providers Fidelity Monitoring: Ongoing Supervision, Consultation


Download ppt "Evidence-Based Interventions to Improve Quality of Life in Dementia Rebecca G. Logsdon, PhD."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google