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2010 CDBG Recipients’ Workshop 2010 Recipients’ Workshop The CDBG Program and successful completion.

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Presentation on theme: "2010 CDBG Recipients’ Workshop 2010 Recipients’ Workshop The CDBG Program and successful completion."— Presentation transcript:

1 2010 CDBG Recipients’ Workshop 2010 Recipients’ Workshop The CDBG Program and successful completion

2 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Congratulations! You’ve won the Grant – Now What? Topics we’ll discuss today: The Players and their roles Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Housing Inspections Work Write-ups, Cost Estimates, Scope of Work Bidding Procedures Elements of a Construction Contract. Oversight of the work Close out

3 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Program Director Develop and administer the program Hire and supervise competent and efficient staff Effectively communicate with elected officials, ultimate program recipients, and contractors Address local groups and gatherings Ensure all reports, documents, and paperwork are submitted on time May or may not be an employee of the local governing body – may be a contracted program administrator

4 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Financial Advisor Must be experienced and knowledgeable of mortgage services and financial counseling resources Communicate with all levels of the community Must be computer and software literate Real Estate experience is an advantage

5 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Rehabilitation Advisor Construction and construction costing experience is a MUST Proficient in inspection procedures Develop clear and coherent work write-ups and cost estimates. Develop clear and precise specifications Knowledgeable of Lead Based Paint regulations Communicate with all levels of the community – especially contractors Respect for the ultimate recipient Possess a pleasant and outgoing personality – or at least be able to give that impression for a couple of hours at a time

6 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Administrative Assistant The heart of the program: interview and hire accordingly He/she must be cognizant of the importance of accurate and timely form and paperwork submission Possess a true pleasant and patient attitude – and the ability to maintain if for longer than two hours at a time Must be able to establish and maintain a quality filing system Be computer and software proficient Respect for the ultimate recipient

7 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Appraiser The appraiser is not usually a fulltime employee but rather a competent resource He/she should be well experienced and well respected in the local community He/she should be certified by the Ga. Real Estate Appraisers Board Be fully aware of your program goals and objectives

8 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The Attorney Again the attorney is not usually a fulltime employee but rather a competent resource He/she should be familiar, experienced and competent in Real Estate, Wills and Trusts, title searches, and Contract laws He/she must be a current member of the Ga. Bar and in good standing Be fully aware of your program goals and objectives Must be acutely aware of deadlines and the need for timely document submittal

9 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles The General Contractor This person can make your program receive national recognition or cause harm. They can be the best or the worst part of your program He/she should be a respected member of the community with a good reputation Construction experience and especially with rehab projects is essential Due diligence is highly recommended

10 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 The Players and their roles Is there any one most important person within your staff?

11 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Georgia Building Codes  The State of Georgia currently follows the International Residential Code for One and Two Family Dwellings, 2006 edition with Georgia Amendments  This is sometimes referred to as 2006 CABO One and Two Family Dwelling Code

12 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Minimum Property Standards Minimum Property Standards (MPS) are local community standards and define what is “descent, safe, and sanitary”  MPS function as a base line of materials used, material properties, structural design, etc.  MPS may exceed Georgia building codes but may not hold a lower standard.

13 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Minimum Property Standards (continued)  MPS may spell out exactly:  What materials may and/or may not be used  The properties of the material (e.g. grade of lumber, PSI rating of concrete, durability of roof shingles, etc.)  How the materials will be installed, used, or applied  MPS may be associated with certain zoning regulations

14 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Minimum Property Standards (continued)  Sample MPS may be obtained from a variety of sources including some off-the-shelf software programs  MPS and Attribute Standards are not the same, we’ll discuss these later  You may develop you own MPS, however, make sure that they do not compromise other related standards or Georgia codes

15 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Minimum Property Standards and Building Codes Minimum Property Standards (continued)  In the absence of a local MPS, you may opt to adopt one of the following model codes: Uniform Building Code (ICBO) National Building Code (BOCA) Standard Southern Building Code (SBCCI) FHA Minimum Property Standards

16 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Housing Inspections Preliminary work oHave a working knowledge of Ga. Building Codes and local MPS oDo a walk around to get the feeling of the structure oTake lots of photographs of interior rooms oTake photographs of all four exterior elevations oDepending upon extent of work required, a floor plan is a good idea. Take accurate interior and exterior measurements oIf you have the capability, do an AutoCAD drawing of the structure, or do a good quality scaled pencil drawing

17 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Housing Inspections Preliminary work (continued) oMake copious notes, memory joggers, dimensions, and material attributes (e.g. color. material, texture, etc.). You’ll need them later – guaranteed! oPrepare a tool box of tools you’ll likely need: flashlight, good screwdriver set, pliers, pocket knife, probing tools, measuring tape, and writing pad oTreat the owner with utmost respect. Respect the furnishings and décor oDon’t touch anything you’re not going to inspect

18 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Housing Inspections Lead Based Paint (LPB) oConsult a certified Lead Based Paint Assessor prior to any rehab if: oThe structure was built before 1978 oIf you suspect the presence of LPB (e.g. antique doors in newer homes) oIf the age of the home cannot be precisely determined and children under 6 or pregnant/fecund females reside oIf the age of the home cannot be precisely determined and there is an reasonable expectation of such residents in the future

19 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Housing Inspections Who performs a general home inspection? oYour Rehab Advisor oCity or county building inspector oExperienced builder or general contractor oPro Bono engineer or architect oA Certified Home Inspector

20 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Housing Inspections What is inspected? oBasically … everything oHealth and safety issues should take first priority oADA issues oCode and MPS violations oStructural issues oIncipient problems oSite and topographical issues oGeneral Property Improvements (GPI) under certain conditions

21 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Work Write–ups, Cost Estimates, and Scopes of Work What is a Work Write-up? oA Work Write-up (WWU) is a document that provides the home owner and Program Director a complete description of what work will be required oA WWU should be created by your Rehab Advisor or a qualified inspector

22 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Work Write –ups, Cost Estimates, and Scopes of Work What is a Work Write-up? (continued) oA WWU should accurately describe: oEach task to be done oLocation of each task (e.g. inside closet door, bedroom #2, toilet in bathroom #1) oAn estimate of area involved (e.g. square yards, linear feet, squares, etc.) oA WWU should be typed in a good, clear, easy to understand format oList and number each item separately

23 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Work Write –ups, Cost Estimates, and Scopes of Work Cost Estimates oA Cost Estimate is a document that tells the rehab Advisor the approximate cost of each project oA good deal of experience is required to develop a good cost estimate oDon’t let a potential contractor do the Cost Estimate DUH…. but it happens! oCost Estimates should never be shown to anyone (except staff) even after job completion

24 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Work Write –ups, Cost Estimates, and Scopes of Work Scope of Work oThe Scope of Work is basically the same as the Work Write-up and contains the same information oIt’s a good practice to have the home owner sign and date the bottom of each page of the Scope of Work.

25 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Specifications An Specification describes precisely the attributes of any particular component of a task (Example: a kitchen countertop) oSpecific material: Formica, cultured marble, Corian oColor oTexture oStyle: Drop-in sink, formed sink oDimensions oOther relevant information

26 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Specifications oThe Specification should have significant input from the home owner oSpecific brand names and model numbers oIt’s advisable to have the home owner sign or initial any sample oColor chip oCarpet or vinyl flooring oCounter top sample oRoof shingles oLack of attribute specifications is the major cause of contractual disputes

27 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Procedures Finding Contractors oAdvertise your program in local papers oPost ads at locations frequented by contractors oHome Depot, Lowes, etc. oBuilding materials supply houses oCity or county building permits offices oOther local communities using grant monies oCreate a list of pre-screened contractors and share with other agencies oPublish “Invitation to Bid” in news papers

28 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Procedures Finding Contractors (continued) oInterview potential contractors oData on Principle owner oFinancial references oProof of insurance oTax ID number oOther business names Principle owner may have worked oHUD debarment list oCustomer list oHow long in business oMUST HAVE CURRENT STATE LICENSE

29 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process Two options given to home owner as to which type of bidding process they prefer o“Open, Free, and Competitive” bid process o“Negotiated” bid process oForm 20-A, 20-B, or 20-C should be completed and signed depending upon owners choice of “Open, Free, Competitive” or “Negotiated” option and whether rehab or reconstruction

30 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) “Open, Free, and Competitive” Prepare a “Bid Package” to include: oA “Contractors Bid Packet” (See Form 6) oAddress of property and Owners name o“General Conditions” and “Special Conditions” (See Exhibit “F2a” & “F2b”) o“Bid and Proposal Form” (Exhibit “F2d”) oComplete Scope of Work oScale drawings (Exhibit “F2f”) oDate, time, and location of bid opening oTerms and Conditions of Rehabilitation Assistance oDraw Schedule

31 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) “Open, Free, and Competitive” (continued) oBid Package should preferably be picked-up at program office oLog of contractors showing date and time of receipt o“Pre-Bid” on-site meeting oDo not alter “Work Write up” at this point. Changes will handled with a Change Order later oPost meeting questions, inform all bidders Seek out as many contractors as possible Ask those choosing not to bid to provide your office a short note on letter head stating “NO BID” on so-and-so contract

32 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) “ Negotiated ” oHome owner may select contractor of their choice so long as contractor meets all program eligibility requirements oNegotiated contractors bid must be within 10% of cost estimate or be negotiate to within that amount OR oHome owner agrees to pay the amount over the 10% limit oFailing to meet these requirements, project must be re-bid

33 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) Receiving the Bids: oNEVER OPEN A BID ENVELOPE BEFORE BID OPENING DATE AND TIME! oUpon receiving the bid response, make certain the envelope is sealed oIf not sealed, initial across the envelope flap and tape over the initials with clear tape while in view of contractor or other witness oEnsure contractors name, project address, and bid opening date and time are noted on the outside oWrite or stamp date and exact time of receipt and sign receivers name oEnter received bid into contractor log

34 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) Opening the Bids: oEstablish date and time of opening oInvite home owner. Responding contractors or other interested parties should be welcome oEnsure one witnessing staff member is present oDo not award bid at contract opening oYou do not have to accept the lowest bid oBe aware of “Low Ball” bids oHome owner should make final decision oBids in excess of 10% above or below cost estimate should be discarded oAny bid in excess of 20% above cost estimate must have DCA approval prior to contract award

35 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Bidding and Procurement Bidding Process (continued) One last thing about bids. Don’t even think about revising cost estimates to match received bids.

36 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Awarding the Contract The Contract: oThe “Guidelines for Residential Rehabilitation” contains a good section on the elements of a Construction Contract oExhibits “F1”, “F2a”, and F2b” provide an outline as well oA “Notice to Commence” or “Notice to Proceed” must be issued prior to starting work (Form 10) oA sample of a “General Contractor Invoice” (Form 11) more frequently called a “Request for Draw” should be included. Expect the contractor to use this format oInclude the “Draw Schedule” in the contract oInclude a sample of a “Release and Waiver of Claim for Subcontractor or Material Supplier” (Form 11). This is more commonly referred to as a “Mechanics Lien”

37 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Awarding the Contract The Contract: oFederal Contractual Requirements: oContractor should provide certification that he/she will abide by all the regulations and provisions as set forth in: oThe Davis/Bacon Act oThe Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act oThe Copeland Anti-Kickback Act oThe Health and Safety Act o;

38 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Contract Oversight  Review work on a regular basis to ensure specifications are met.  Document all site visits and inspections.  Ensure Safety measures have been taken.  NEVER verbally agree to a Change Order.  Change Orders must be signed by all parties  Inspect work prior to approving a Draw Request.  Never vary from the Work Write –Up without a Change Order.

39 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Grievance and Arbitration Establish a clearly defined Grievance and Arbitration procedure in your Policies and Procedures Statement.  Include this Statement in the Contract between the home owner and contractor.  90% of all grievances can be resolved at this level.  IF YOU DON’T HAVE A WELL WRITTEN WORK WRITE-UP: YOU’RE IN TROUBLE!

40 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 Monitoring for compliance All programs are required to be monitored. ▪ Monitoring are usually scheduled in advance but may be subject to review without notice. ▪ You are responsible for organization and maintenance of all records. ▪ A Contractual obligation between a recipient and a third party (i.e. Consultant) does not absolve the recipient of ultimate accountability for all aspects of the grant.

41 Page CDBG Recipients’ WorkshopSeptember 30, 2010 QUESTIONS? Thomas Spinks Sr. Housing Consultant (404)


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