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TODAY’S PRESENTATION: Kate Fisher: Definitions & Statistics: Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty Priscilla Marlar: The Rewards of Academic Honesty:

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Presentation on theme: "TODAY’S PRESENTATION: Kate Fisher: Definitions & Statistics: Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty Priscilla Marlar: The Rewards of Academic Honesty:"— Presentation transcript:

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2 TODAY’S PRESENTATION: Kate Fisher: Definitions & Statistics: Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty Priscilla Marlar: The Rewards of Academic Honesty: Membership in Sigma Tau Delta Michael Lowe: Responding to Academic Dishonesty: Sigma’s Experience as a Case Study Kayleigh Septer: Understanding Plagiarism: Experiences from the Classroom Lydia Baker-Crawley: Help Build the Academic Community: Share Your Writing & Art in Design

3 Kate Fisher: Definitions & Statistics: Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty

4 The IWC College Catalog defines academic dishonesty as plagiarism or cheating: “Plagiarism is the intellectual theft of another’s ideas. It involves the failure to accurately cite the sources used in researching a paper or project, both in the body of the paper/project as well as on the Works Cited page” (195). The Catalog also explains that “cheating” includes other types of academic dishonesty, such as making up data, and stealing or buying a paper from another student. Selling a paper to another student is considered worse than buying one, because it takes advantage of another student’s vulnerability (195). There are other examples of cheating listed, and the punishment for academic dishonesty is also explained.

5 Which of the following behaviors have you done? (205 participants) Submit paper/project for more than one class w/out instructor’s permission …………… % Paraphrase material w/out citing ………………………. 27.0% Allowing someone to copy your work on an assignment or exam ………………………………. 36.7% Copying material from a book w/out crediting the source …………………………… % Copying another student’s work with his/her permission/knowledge …………………… 22.4%

6 Which of the following behaviors have you done? (205 participants) Doing another student’s work for him or her ………… % Making up excuses to not come to class so you can have an extended deadline ……….…… % Using cheat sheets on an exam ….…………………… % Finding out about the test before you take it by consulting another student who has already taken it …………….…………………………… 37.8% Communicate an answer on an exam with another student …………………………………… 17.3%

7 In general, how often do you think students at IWC cheat? Never ………………………… % Rarely.…………………………. 10.8% Sometimes ………………… % Often …………………………… 32.3% Most of the time ………………. 15.9% Always ………………………….. 3.6% Source of statistics: The Student Ethics/Excellence Survey undertaken by the Ethics and Excellence Task Force, Iowa Wesleyan College, Spring 2009.

8 Priscilla Marlar: The Rewards of Academic Honesty: Membership in Sigma Tau Delta

9 1924 Honor Society founded 1925 IWC chapter, Omicron Alpha, founded Design publication begins 2000 Design issue for 1999 receives best literary arts journal award; chapter members attend regional conference 2009 Design 2008 receives best literary arts journal award; Writing submissions by five students accepted to international conference; Design 2009 published with plagiarized poem.

10 Omicron Alpha chapter at the 2009 convention

11 Michael Lowe: Responding to Academic Dishonesty: Sigma’s Experience as a Case Study

12 The IWC College Catalog defines academic dishonesty as plagiarism or cheating: “Plagiarism is the intellectual theft of another’s ideas. It involves the failure to accurately cite the sources used in researching a paper or project, both in the body of the paper/project as well as on the Works Cited page” (195). The Catalog also explains that “cheating” includes other types of academic dishonesty, such as making up data, and stealing or buying a paper from another student; selling a paper to another student is considered worse than buying one, because it takes advantage of another student’s vulnerability (195). There are other examples of cheating listed, and the punishment for academic dishonesty is also explained.

13 student’s own ideas

14 Design 2009, cover by Prof. Jerry Naylor

15 chapter members working on Design 2009

16 2009 active chapter members

17 student-authors & artists published in Design 2009

18 Kayleigh Septer: Understanding Plagiarism: Experiences from the Classroom

19 WORD FOR WORD: NOT QUOTED As the train pulled out of the Ulm railway station, Sophie Scholl sat back in her seat. It was an unusually warm day for early May and the trip promised to be a pleasant one. She was alone in the compartment as the train began to move in the direction of Munich, some 150 kilometers to the southeast. On the rack above her head was a suitcase; next to her on the seat was a small bag containing a bottle of wine and a cake. (Dumbach & Newborn, 11)

20 Source With Quotation Marks Properly Used Annette Dumbach and Jud Newborn, in Sophie Scholl and the White Rose, note that Sophie “… was alone in the compartment as the train began to move in the direction of Munich, some 150 kilometers to the southeast” (11). In addition, need to add student’s own ideas after the quotation to complete the paragraph.

21 Lydia Baker-Crawley: Help Build the Academic Community: Share Your Writing & Art in Design

22 COMMUNICATE: Talk to your instructors and peers Voice concerns/ideas It can be as simple as articulating ideas: a sounding board Questions save guesswork

23 UTILIZE THE ARC: As the writer, you become too close to the work to view it objectively during revision A second set of eyes to proofread Offers invaluable experience and assistance

24 TIME MANAGEMENT: Start your projects early Have your own opinions/view of subject Make connections & see subject in unique way Always start with your thoughts and views Use research to support, not dominate, those thoughts and views

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28 Works Cited Dumbach, Annette and Jud Newborn. Sophie Scholl and the White Rose. Oxford, England: Oneworld, Ethics and Excellence Task Force, Iowa Wesleyan College. The Student Ethics/Excellence Survey. Unpublished survey, Spring Iowa Wesleyan College College Catalog. Mt. Pleasant, IA: Iowa Wesleyan College, Sigma Tau Delta. Constitution and Bylaws. Sigma Tau Delta. 11 Sep Web. 27 Jan Source for Images on Slides 14 & 16 : Design Mt. Pleasant, IA: Division of Language & Literature and Omicron Alpha chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, 2009.

29 With thanks to Prof. Ann Klingensmith for designing the poster to promote this Forum.


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