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Is Privacy Dead? Do we Care? Anne H Anderson University of Dundee Director ESRC/EPSRC/DTI the Centre of Communication and Information Technologies.

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Presentation on theme: "Is Privacy Dead? Do we Care? Anne H Anderson University of Dundee Director ESRC/EPSRC/DTI the Centre of Communication and Information Technologies."— Presentation transcript:

1 Is Privacy Dead? Do we Care? Anne H Anderson University of Dundee Director ESRC/EPSRC/DTI the Centre of Communication and Information Technologies (PACCIT) Research Programme

2 Security & Privacy: Balancing threats & civil liberties ‘Sleep walking into a surveillance society?’

3 What about our individual responsibilities ? We all have access to more surveillance technology than George Orwell’s Big Brother ever dreamed of Are we all paparazzi now? Or Citizen reporters? Or spies ? Or peeping toms?

4 Professional Responsibilities Design for privacy Design against crime Mobile phones in Korea Legal changes in US and elsewhere Technology awareness & informed use Many social, ethical and engineering challenges to design for informed use

5 Most surveyed society After CCTV comes? You’ve been nicked – by a lamppost (Guardian, March 30 th, 2005) Flashcam trials in UK – cameras high on lampposts in high crime areas Sense human movement and shout ‘ Stop if you are engaging in illegal activity! Your photograph will be taken and used to prosecute you. Please leave the area.’ Claim is wrongdoers flee the scene Do we accept the privacy/civil liberties issues?

6 Principle of Reciprocity? Nannycam Social Networking – privacy policies Privacy safegaurds – social etiquette Accessing Facebook to screen employees

7 Privacy in Social Networking MySpace 150 million users FaceBook 34 million active members Privacy policies changed & criticised Hinduja & Patchin (in press) 40% teenagers on MySpace restrict access Only 9% gave full names 8% of sample were cleraly lying about their age <16 Sophos report on geography networks and Freddi Staur – 41% ‘friends’ divulged personal data

8 Technology Development Privacy and Social Implications Web2.0 Flikr TiVo Social Networking Are these changing our notion of privacy? Are they leading to a social revolution or …? How far are we responsible for protecting our own privacy? Can or should we design features to protect ourselves?

9 brainball Brainball: Winning by Relaxing. Brainball is a game where you compete in relaxation. The players' brainwaves control a ball on a table, and the more relaxed scores a goal over the opponent. >> To buy commercialized version: mindball.semindball.se homehome | projects | publications | events | people | partners | press | newsprojectspublicationseventspeoplepartnerspress news projects >> project page >> what is a project?project pagewhat is a project? :: ongoing (start dates) Touching the Invisible RemoteHome Meta.L.Hyttan occular witness dysfunctional things :: completed plentycast responsive field of lattice archipelogics the catcher :: completed amoeba photo messenger Camsense ComHome camelot lords of legacy :: completed rewind th Sense brainbar orb Delay mirror ReFashion Lab :: completed earlier white stones virus brainball seated earlier projects :: guest projects A. Frigo autobio­graphical memory systemTouching the InvisibleRemoteHomeMeta.L.Hyttanoccular witnessdysfunctional thingsplentycastresponsive field of lattice archipelogicsthe catcheramoebaphoto messengerCamsenseComHomecamelotlords of legacyrewind6th SensebrainbarorbDelay mirrorReFashion Labwhite stonesvirusbrainballseated earlier projectsautobio­graphical memory system Brainball is a game that goes against the conventional competitive concept, and also reinvents the relationship between man and machine. Instead of activity and adrenalin, it is passivity and calmness that mark the truly successful Brainball player. Brainball is unique amongst machines since it is not controlled by the player's rational and strategic thoughts and decisions. On the contrary, the participants are dependent on the body's own intuitive reactions to the game machine. At first glance, Brainball seems similar to a traditional two player game - two people challenge one and other and take their respective positions at each end of a table that is laid out with two goals and a little ball. The rest of the game's equipment is more special. Both players wear a strap around their forehead that contains electrodes and is wired up to a biosensor system. This system, that is used to measure the body's biological signals, is tightly fastened to the frontal lobes and registers the electrical activity in the brain - so called EEG (electro­ encephalo­gram). The players brain activity is graphed in a diagram on a computer screen so that the public can easily follow the players mental processes during the match. The brain waves that move the ball forward, increasing the chance of victory, are called alpha and theta waves. They are generated in the brain when one is calm and relaxed. A considerably stressed player will therefore lose. The matches outcome is rarely obvious since the transition between calm and stress, and vice versa, can occur quickly. Often, the ball will roll backwards and forwards for a few minutes before the game is concluded. In this way, Brainball is an exciting and social game where the audience can follow the match by watching the ball on the table, the graph on the screens and the more or less relaxed expressions of the players. text: Annika Hansson in collaboration with the project group. Translated to English by Lukas Gimpel.Annika HanssonLukas Gimpel start: Aug 1999 end: Jun 2000 publications: Brainball - using brain activity for cool competitionBrainball - using brain activity for cool competition The making of brainball project leader: Magnus Jonsson Magnus Jonsson project team: Olof Bendt Thomas Broomé Lennart Andersson Aurelian Bria Carolina Browall Esbjörn Eriksson Sara Ilstedt Hjelm Arijana Kajfes Fredrik Petersson Tobi Schneidler Ingvar Sjöberg Konrad Tollmar Lotten Wiklund design: Lennart Andersson och Jakob Boije, Ergonomidesign Ergonomidesign partners: Ergonomidesign Horreds Furniture press material: pictures pictures related topics: EEG and biofeedback technical design references Brainball as a research objectBrainball as a research object Commercial version: mindball.se mindball.se © 2003 Smart Studio site creditssite credits brainball Brainball: Winning by Relaxing. Brainball is a game where you compete in relaxation. The players' brainwaves control a ball on a table, and the more relaxed scores a goal over the opponent. >> To buy commercialized version: mindball.semindball.se homehome | projects | publications | events | people | partners | press | newsprojectspublicationseventspeoplepartnerspress news projects >> project page >> what is a project?project pagewhat is a project? :: ongoing (start dates) Touching the Invisible RemoteHome Meta.L.Hyttan occular witness dysfunctional things :: completed plentycast responsive field of lattice archipelogics the catcher :: completed amoeba photo messenger Camsense ComHome camelot lords of legacy :: completed rewind th Sense brainbar orb Delay mirror ReFashion Lab :: completed earlier white stones virus brainball seated earlier projects :: guest projects A. Frigo autobio­graphical memory systemTouching the InvisibleRemoteHomeMeta.L.Hyttanoccular witnessdysfunctional thingsplentycastresponsive field of lattice archipelogicsthe catcheramoebaphoto messengerCamsenseComHomecamelotlords of legacyrewind6th SensebrainbarorbDelay mirrorReFashion Labwhite stonesvirusbrainballseated earlier projectsautobio­graphical memory system Brainball is a game that goes against the conventional competitive concept, and also reinvents the relationship between man and machine. Instead of activity and adrenalin, it is passivity and calmness that mark the truly successful Brainball player. Brainball is unique amongst machines since it is not controlled by the player's rational and strategic thoughts and decisions. On the contrary, the participants are dependent on the body's own intuitive reactions to the game machine. At first glance, Brainball seems similar to a traditional two player game - two people challenge one and other and take their respective positions at each end of a table that is laid out with two goals and a little ball. The rest of the game's equipment is more special. Both players wear a strap around their forehead that contains electrodes and is wired up to a biosensor system. This system, that is used to measure the body's biological signals, is tightly fastened to the frontal lobes and registers the electrical activity in the brain - so called EEG (electro­ encephalo­gram). The players brain activity is graphed in a diagram on a computer screen so that the public can easily follow the players mental processes during the match. The brain waves that move the ball forward, increasing the chance of victory, are called alpha and theta waves. They are generated in the brain when one is calm and relaxed. A considerably stressed player will therefore lose. The matches outcome is rarely obvious since the transition between calm and stress, and vice versa, can occur quickly. Often, the ball will roll backwards and forwards for a few minutes before the game is concluded. In this way, Brainball is an exciting and social game where the audience can follow the match by watching the ball on the table, the graph on the screens and the more or less relaxed expressions of the players. text: Annika Hansson in collaboration with the project group. Translated to English by Lukas Gimpel.Annika HanssonLukas Gimpel start: Aug 1999 end: Jun 2000 publications: Brainball - using brain activity for cool competitionBrainball - using brain activity for cool competition The making of brainball project leader: Magnus Jonsson Magnus Jonsson project team: Olof Bendt Thomas Broomé Lennart Andersson Aurelian Bria Carolina Browall Esbjörn Eriksson Sara Ilstedt Hjelm Arijana Kajfes Fredrik Petersson Tobi Schneidler Ingvar Sjöberg Konrad Tollmar Lotten Wiklund design: Lennart Andersson och Jakob Boije, Ergonomidesign Ergonomidesign partners: Ergonomidesign Horreds Furniture press material: pictures pictures related topics: EEG and biofeedback technical design references Brainball as a research objectBrainball as a research object Commercial version: mindball.se mindball.se © 2003 Smart Studio site creditssite credits New forms of Interaction: Brainball Smart Things Studio, Stockholm “ Brainball is a game where you compete in relaxation. The players' brainwaves control a ball on a table, and the more relaxed scores a goal over the opponent. “ The players brain activity is graphed in a diagram on a computer screen so that the public can easily follow the players mental processes during the match.“ Interaction by brain waves The internal made external – what is private or personal?

10 Are all technologies acceptable? RFID tags have raised concerns in UK and US ‘RFID Tracking Pilot Programme ended in Sutter School’ – US School ID tags with RFID rejected ‘Our children should never have been tagged like pieces of inventory or cattle. The RFID tags violated the students’ privacy and were demeaning’ ‘Big Brother at the supermarket till’ BBC news Some consumer groups fear being spied on TESCO & MS deny the intention or capability

11 Instant News vs Happy Slapping Mobile phones provided some of the more immediate and vivid images of the bomb attacks in London. BBC News ‘Floods of photos: before TV ‘ Happy Slappers attack women with baseball bats’ ‘Happy slapping youths convicted of manslaugther’ ‘Happy slappers attack star’ ‘Does happy slapping exist?’

12 Is Privacy Dead?? Well it is looking a bit peaky The boundaries between /virtual/private/public/ are blurring We have a role in stimulating debate on the implications, costs/benefits What should the penalties be for privacy breaches? We are social beings with ethical concerns We also have individual responsibilities We can develop privacy conventions We can also design & implement technologies with privacy in mind

13 For Further Discussions of these Issues: Royal Academy of Engineering Report Dilemmas of Privacy and Surveillance: Challenges of Technological Change


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