Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Telescopes: Augmenting the Eye Text, Chapter 4 Thanks to: howstuffworks.com bbc/science.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Telescopes: Augmenting the Eye Text, Chapter 4 Thanks to: howstuffworks.com bbc/science."— Presentation transcript:

1 Telescopes: Augmenting the Eye Text, Chapter 4 Thanks to: howstuffworks.com bbc/science

2 A telescope is a device used to magnify distant objects. Telescopes come in all shapes and sizes, from a little plastic tube you buy at a toy store for $2, to the Hubble Space Telescope, which weighs several tons.

3 Most of the telescopes you see today come in one of two “flavors”: The refractor telescope, which uses glass lenses. The reflector telescope, which uses mirrors instead of the lenses. Both types accomplish exactly the same thing, but in completely different ways.

4 This is the simplest telescope design you could have. A big lens gathers the light and directs it to a focal point and a small lens brings the image to your eye.

5 To understand how telescopes work, let's ask the following question. Why can't you see an object that is far away? The answer to this question is simple: the object does not take up much space on your eye's screen (retina).

6 If you had a "bigger eye," you could collect more light from the object and create a brighter image, and then you could magnify part of that image so it stretches out over a larger area on your retina.

7 Two things make this “bigger eye” possible, the objective lens and the eyepiece lens.

8 The objective lens (in refractors ) or primary mirror (in reflectors ) collects light from a distant object and brings that light, or image, to a point or focus.

9 An eyepiece lens takes the bright light from the focus of the objective lens or primary mirror and "spreads it out" (magnifies it) to take up a large portion of the retina.

10 This is the same principle that a magnifying glass (lens) uses; it takes a small image and spreads it out over the retina of your eye so that it looks big.

11 When you combine the objective lens or primary mirror with the eyepiece, you have a telescope.

12 A telescope has two general properties: A telescope has two general properties: – how well it can collect the light – how much it can magnify the image A telescope's ability to collect light is directly related to the diameter of the lens or mirror - - the aperture -- that is used to gather light. A telescope's ability to collect light is directly related to the diameter of the lens or mirror - - the aperture -- that is used to gather light.

13 The telescope's magnification, its ability to enlarge an image, depends on the combination of lenses used. The eyepiece performs the magnification. Since any magnification can be achieved by almost any telescope by using different eyepieces, aperture is a more important feature than magnification. niverse/exploration/jodrell_bank_obse rvatory#p009sgwl

14 Refractor Telescopes Refractors are the type of telescope that most of us are familiar with. They have the following parts: – a long tube, made of metal, plastic, or wood – a glass combination lens at the front end ( objective lens ) – a second glass combination lens ( eyepiece )

15 The tube holds the lenses in place at the correct distance from one another. The objective lens gathers the light, and bends or refracts it to a focus near the back of the tube. The eyepiece brings the image to your eye, and magnifies the image.

16 Refractors have good resolution, high enough to see details in planets and binary stars. However, it is difficult to make large objective lenses (greater than 4 inches or 10 centimeters) for refractors. WHY?

17 Refraction When light moves at an angle from one material into another, its direction of travel will generally bend. This is called “refraction.”

18 Refraction not only bends light but also generally spreads the light into its component colors, breaking white light into a spectrum. This chromatic aberration becomes more apparent the further way the observed objects are. Also, the larger the lens the greater the potential chromatic aberration.

19 Reflector Telescopes Isaac Newton developed the reflector telescope about 1680, in response to the chromatic aberration problem that plagued refractors during his time. Isaac Newton developed the reflector telescope about 1680, in response to the chromatic aberration problem that plagued refractors during his time.

20 Instead of using a lens to gather light, Newton used a curved, metal mirror (primary mirror) to collect the light and reflect it to a focus. Mirrors do not have the chromatic aberration problems that lenses do. (Newton placed the primary mirror in the back of the tube.)

21 Because the mirror reflected light back into the tube, he had to use a small, flat mirror (secondary mirror) in the focal path of the primary mirror to deflect the image out through the side of the tube, to the eyepiece; otherwise, his head would get in the way of incoming light. Because the mirror reflected light back into the tube, he had to use a small, flat mirror (secondary mirror) in the focal path of the primary mirror to deflect the image out through the side of the tube, to the eyepiece; otherwise, his head would get in the way of incoming light.

22 The Newtonian reflector was a highly successful design, and remains one of the most popular telescope designs in use today.

23 Rich-field (or wide-field) reflectors are a type of Newtonian reflector with short focal ratios and low magnification.

24 They provide bright, panoramic views of comets and deep-sky objects like nebulae, galaxies and star clusters.

25 Why Reflectors? The reflector is simple and inexpensive to make. Large aperture primary mirrors (greater than 10 inches or 25 centimeters) can be made easily, which means that reflectors have a relatively low cost per unit of aperture. 1.5 Meter Primary Mirror for Kepler Spacecraft

26 Reflectors have large light gathering capacities, and can produce bright images of faint, deep- sky objects for visual observing as well as astrophotography. Horsehead nebula, 1500 LY from Earth

27 Disadvantages of Reflectors You occasionally have to clean and align the mirrors. Slight errors in grinding the mirrors can also distort the image.

28 More common errors… Spherical aberration Spherical aberration - light reflected from the mirror's edge gets focused to a slightly different point than light reflected from the center.

29 Astigmatism- the mirror is not ground symmetrically about its center (it might be slightly egg-shaped, for example); star images focus to crosses rather than to points.

30 Coma Coma - stars near the edge of the field look elongated, like comets, while those in the center are sharp points of light.

31 Telescopes are devices that allow us to see things far away better. The word comes from the Greek: Τελε = Far Σκοπος = Seer Or Τελεσκοπος “Farseer” All telescopes gather E-M waves (light) and focus it. Some even let you ‘see’ wavelengths you can’t normally see. For example Radio telescopes lets us ‘see’ radio and microwaves.

32 The Parts of an Optical Telescope An optical telescope gathers visible light to create an image. All have the following parts: An “Objective” lens or mirror that gathers light and creates a real image of the object. Light passes through it or reflects off it first. An “Eyepiece”, a converging lens that makes a magnified virtual image of the real image made by the objective It is this virtual image that you see.

33 Two types of Optical Telescopes Refracting Telescopes or “Refractor” Which gathers light using a Converging Lens as an Objective Reflecting Telescopes or “Reflector” Which gathers light using a Concave Mirror as an Objective


Download ppt "Telescopes: Augmenting the Eye Text, Chapter 4 Thanks to: howstuffworks.com bbc/science."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google