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Air Pollution, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion.

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Presentation on theme: "Air Pollution, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion."— Presentation transcript:

1 Air Pollution, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion

2 CLIMATE: A BRIEF INTRODUCTION Weather is a local area’s short-term physical conditions such as temperature and precipitation. Weather is a local area’s short-term physical conditions such as temperature and precipitation. Climate is a region’s average weather conditions over a long time. Climate is a region’s average weather conditions over a long time. Latitude and elevation help determine climate. Latitude and elevation help determine climate. The two most important factors are temperature and precipitation. The two most important factors are temperature and precipitation.

3 Earth’ climate system distributes heat & precipitation over time, creating climate Creates “weather” – day-to-day winds, clouds, rains, storms, heat waves, droughts, etc

4 Earth’s climate system is composed of atmosphere/ocean interactions (driven by sun)

5 Masses of air and water transfer solar energy through circulation/convection

6 Solar Energy and Global Air Circulation: Distributing Heat Global air circulation is driven by the uneven heating of the earth’s surface by solar energy, seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation: Global air circulation is driven by the uneven heating of the earth’s surface by solar energy, seasonal changes in temperature and precipitation: Angle of rays Angle of rays Surface area Surface area Reflective surfaces Reflective surfaces

7 VERY IMPORTANT: What causes the seasons? The ANGLE of the sun’s rays. Direct sunlight = summer Direct = more sunlight in a smaller area  more heat stored Indirect sunlight = winter Indirect = sunlight spread over larger area  less heat stored

8 Albedo The higher the albedo of a surface, the more sun that is reflected and the less heat stored The lower the albedo of a surface, the more sun that is absorbed and the more heat stored.

9 Core Case Study Blowing in the Wind: A Story of Connections Wind connects most life on earth. Wind connects most life on earth. Keeps tropics from being unbearably hot. Keeps tropics from being unbearably hot. Prevents rest of world from freezing. Prevents rest of world from freezing. Figure 5-1

10 Definition Air pressure is pressure exerted by the weight of Earth’s atmosphere. At sea level it is equal to pounds per square inch. Air pressure is pressure exerted by the weight of Earth’s atmosphere. At sea level it is equal to pounds per square inch. A barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure. A barometer is used to measure atmospheric pressure. Air Pressure

11 Pressure Gradient Changes from high to low. On a map there is an arrow to show this. A higher pressure gradient means stronger winds (the isobars on a weather map would be drawn closer together). Changes from high to low. On a map there is an arrow to show this. A higher pressure gradient means stronger winds (the isobars on a weather map would be drawn closer together). Air Pressure

12 Cause Wind is caused by the pressure gradient force. High pressure means more air, and low pressure means less air. The air moves from high to low, causing wind. Wind is caused by the pressure gradient force. High pressure means more air, and low pressure means less air. The air moves from high to low, causing wind. Wind

13 The Coriolis Effect Forces in the atmosphere, created by the rotation of the Earth on its axis, that deflect winds to the right in the N. Hemisphere and to the left in the S.Hemisphere. Forces in the atmosphere, created by the rotation of the Earth on its axis, that deflect winds to the right in the N. Hemisphere and to the left in the S.Hemisphere. Wind

14 Convection Cells: with No spin

15 Coriolis Effect Global air circulation is affected by the rotation of the earth on its axis. Global air circulation is affected by the rotation of the earth on its axis. Figure 5-4 Wind

16 Friction A combination of the pressure gradient force and the coriolis effect. Friction at the Earth’s surface causes winds to turn a little. Friction runs parallel to the isobar. A combination of the pressure gradient force and the coriolis effect. Friction at the Earth’s surface causes winds to turn a little. Friction runs parallel to the isobar. Wind

17 Upper Level Flow There is little friction up in the upper troposphere, driving surface features. Ex. during big thunderstorms, the wind in the upper level will tell which way the thunderstorm will move. There is little friction up in the upper troposphere, driving surface features. Ex. during big thunderstorms, the wind in the upper level will tell which way the thunderstorm will move. Wind

18 Cyclones (called hurricanes in the Atlantic and typhoons in the Pacific) (called hurricanes in the Atlantic and typhoons in the Pacific) Violent storms that form over warm ocean waters and can pass over coastal land. Violent storms that form over warm ocean waters and can pass over coastal land. Giant, rotating storms with winds of at least 74 mph. The most powerful ones have wind velocities greater than 155 mph. Giant, rotating storms with winds of at least 74 mph. The most powerful ones have wind velocities greater than 155 mph. Wind

19 Polar vs. Tropical The atmosphere has three prevailing winds. The atmosphere has three prevailing winds. Prevailing winds that blow from the North or South Pole are called Polar Easterlies. Prevailing winds that blow from the North or South Pole are called Polar Easterlies. Winds that blow in the middle lattitudes (between 3o and 60 degrees) are called the Westerlies Winds that blow in the middle lattitudes (between 3o and 60 degrees) are called the Westerlies Tropical winds that blow toward the equator are called Trade Winds. Tropical winds that blow toward the equator are called Trade Winds. Air Masses and Winds

20 Prevailing Winds

21 Continental vs. Maritime Continental fronts are generally cool and dry, whereas maritime (ocean) fronts are generally warm and moist. When these two air masses converge, the result is usually rain. Continental fronts are generally cool and dry, whereas maritime (ocean) fronts are generally warm and moist. When these two air masses converge, the result is usually rain. Air Masses and Storms

22 Convection Currents Global air circulation is affected by the properties of air water, and land. Global air circulation is affected by the properties of air water, and land. Figure 5-5

23 Convection Cells Heat and moisture are distributed over the earth’s surface by vertical currents, which form six giant convection cells at different latitudes. Heat and moisture are distributed over the earth’s surface by vertical currents, which form six giant convection cells at different latitudes. Figure 5-6

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25 Hadley Cells Warm moist air rises at the equator. Rain Warm moist air rises at the equator. Rain As air rises, it spreads out north & south, then cools and sinks at 30 degrees. Dry As air rises, it spreads out north & south, then cools and sinks at 30 degrees. Dry This is why most of the world’s deserts are found at 30 degrees. This is why most of the world’s deserts are found at 30 degrees. These are called the horse latitudes (3o degrees) because early settlers would get stuck here in their boats & couldn’t move. They would finally throw their horses overboard to lighten the load & get moving again. These are called the horse latitudes (3o degrees) because early settlers would get stuck here in their boats & couldn’t move. They would finally throw their horses overboard to lighten the load & get moving again. Trade Winds blow towards equator Trade Winds blow towards equator Circulation Patterns

26 Ferrell Cells Warm air rises at about 60 degrees. Rain Warm air rises at about 60 degrees. Rain and sinks at around 30 degrees, dry, both north and south. and sinks at around 30 degrees, dry, both north and south. Westerlies. Predominant winds in US Westerlies. Predominant winds in US Circulation Patterns

27 Polar Cells Air rises at about 60 degrees. Rain Air rises at about 60 degrees. Rain floats north, and sinks at around 90 degrees, both north and south. Dry floats north, and sinks at around 90 degrees, both north and south. Dry Easterlies Easterlies Circulation Patterns

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29 Convection Cells Ocean water transfers heat to the atmosphere, especially near the hot equator. (Trade winds) Ocean water transfers heat to the atmosphere, especially near the hot equator. (Trade winds) This creates convection cells that transport heat and water from one area to another. This creates convection cells that transport heat and water from one area to another. The resulting convection cells circulate air, heat, and moisture both vertically and from place-to- place in the troposphere, leading to different climates & patterns of vegetation. The resulting convection cells circulate air, heat, and moisture both vertically and from place-to- place in the troposphere, leading to different climates & patterns of vegetation. Circulation Patterns

30 Sea, Land, Valley, & Mountain Breezes Sea - ocean-to-land breezes that occur during the day. Sea - ocean-to-land breezes that occur during the day. Land - land-to-ocean breezes that occur at night. Land - land-to-ocean breezes that occur at night. Valley - the wind blows from the plains into a valley between two mountains, the wind must divert into a smaller area. This causes high winds to form through the valleys. Valley - the wind blows from the plains into a valley between two mountains, the wind must divert into a smaller area. This causes high winds to form through the valleys. Mountain - Cool air coming from the top of the mountain sinks down on the eastern slope, causing increased winds on the mountain. Mountain - Cool air coming from the top of the mountain sinks down on the eastern slope, causing increased winds on the mountain.

31 Microclimate – Rain shadow effect Topography, water bodies and other local features create local climate conditions known as microclimate. Topography, water bodies and other local features create local climate conditions known as microclimate. For example mountains commonly result in high rainfall on the windward side and low rainfall in the rain shadow of the leeward side. For example mountains commonly result in high rainfall on the windward side and low rainfall in the rain shadow of the leeward side. We see this in LA: rainier on our side of the mountain – desert on the other side We see this in LA: rainier on our side of the mountain – desert on the other side

32 Microclimate – Rain shadow effect Topography, water bodies and other local features create local climate conditions known as microclimate. Topography, water bodies and other local features create local climate conditions known as microclimate. For example mountains commonly result in high rainfall on the windward side and low rainfall in the rain shadow of the leeward side. For example mountains commonly result in high rainfall on the windward side and low rainfall in the rain shadow of the leeward side.

33 Ocean Currents: Distributing Heat and Nutrients Ocean currents influence climate by distributing heat from place to place and mixing and distributing nutrients. Ocean currents influence climate by distributing heat from place to place and mixing and distributing nutrients.

34 Ocean Currents: Distributing Heat and Nutrients Ocean currents influence climate by distributing heat from place to place and mixing and distributing nutrients. Ocean currents influence climate by distributing heat from place to place and mixing and distributing nutrients.

35 Earth’s Current Climate Zones Figure 5-2

36 Weather is the condition in the atmosphere at a given place and time. Weather is the condition in the atmosphere at a given place and time. Weather includes temperature, atmospheric pressure, precipitation, cloudiness, humidity, and wind. Weather includes temperature, atmospheric pressure, precipitation, cloudiness, humidity, and wind. Weather

37 Local Weather Weather is a local area’s short-term physical conditions such as temperature and precipitation. Weather is a local area’s short-term physical conditions such as temperature and precipitation. A weather front marks the boundary between two air-masses at different densities. A weather front marks the boundary between two air-masses at different densities. A front is about km wide and slopes where warm and cool air masses collide. A front is about km wide and slopes where warm and cool air masses collide. Cold frontWarm front

38 Warm Front - The boundary between an advancing warm air mass and the cooler one it is replacing. Because warm air is less dense than cool air, an advancing warm front will rise up over a mass of cool air. Warm Front - The boundary between an advancing warm air mass and the cooler one it is replacing. Because warm air is less dense than cool air, an advancing warm front will rise up over a mass of cool air. The leading edge of an advancing air mass of cold air. Because cool air is more dense than warm air, an advancing cold front stays close to the ground and wedges underneath less dense, warmer air. A cold front produces rapidly moving, towering clouds called thunderheads. The leading edge of an advancing air mass of cold air. Because cool air is more dense than warm air, an advancing cold front stays close to the ground and wedges underneath less dense, warmer air. A cold front produces rapidly moving, towering clouds called thunderheads. Weather Warm & Cold Fronts

39 Stationary & Occluded Front A stationary front is a transitional zone between two nearly stationary air masses of different density. A stationary front is a transitional zone between two nearly stationary air masses of different density. An occluded front is the air front established when a cold front occludes (prevents the passage of) a warm front. An occluded front is the air front established when a cold front occludes (prevents the passage of) a warm front. Weather

40 Seasons The Earth’s 23.5 degree incline on its axis remains the same as it travels around the sun. As the earth spins around the sun the seasons change. The Earth’s 23.5 degree incline on its axis remains the same as it travels around the sun. As the earth spins around the sun the seasons change.

41 Earth-Sun-Moon Earth’s axis has a 23.5° tilt. This tilt always faces the same way, resulting in seasonal changes in sunlight and weather. Solar year: the journey around the sun takes days. Lunar month: the time between successive full moons is 29.5 days, but the moons orbit around the Earth takes 27.3 days. Because the moon spins on its own axis once every 27.3 days, the same side of the moon always faces the Earth. Earth day: the Earth spins on its axis with respect to the stars once every 23h 56 min 4.09s (one sidereal day). The solar day, where the sun returns to its zenith, is exactly 24 hours. All images: NASA

42 Orbital Cycles Three long term cycles that the Earth goes through as it orbits the Sun are: Three long term cycles that the Earth goes through as it orbits the Sun are: Axial tilt: the axis of the Earth varies from 21.5° to 24.5°. Orbital eccentricity: Earth’s orbit varies from almost circular to elliptical. Precession: the movement of the axes in space causes them to describe a cone. All images: NASA

43 Axial Tilt The tilt of the Earth’s axis ranges between 21.5° and 24.5°. The tilt of the Earth’s axis ranges between 21.5° and 24.5°. This can have severe effects on the climate. This can have severe effects on the climate. An axis tilt of 21.5 o allows more heating near the poles leading to a less extreme temperature gradient from pole to equator. When tilted at 24.5 o the variation between winter and summer temperatures is much more pronounced.

44 Eccentricity When the Earth’s orbit is almost circular (as it is now), both summers and winters are relatively mild. When the Earth’s orbit is almost circular (as it is now), both summers and winters are relatively mild. This can trigger ice sheet build up as summer is not warm enough to melt winter snow. This can trigger ice sheet build up as summer is not warm enough to melt winter snow. All images: NASA ‣ When Earth’s orbit is more elliptical, summers (as shown here) in the northern hemisphere can be relatively cold while winters are relatively warm. The opposite occurs in the southern hemisphere

45 Precession Precession alters the orbital position of the summer and winter solstices. Precession alters the orbital position of the summer and winter solstices. Around 13,000 years ago the southern hemisphere’s summer occurred in June.

46 Orbital Cycles The changes in the tilting of the Earth’s axis, combined with precession and eccentricity can cause variations in the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface. The changes in the tilting of the Earth’s axis, combined with precession and eccentricity can cause variations in the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth’s surface. This can trigger the onset and recession of ice ages. This can trigger the onset and recession of ice ages.

47 Formation of the Atmosphere Most of the Earth’s early atmosphere was lost due to the vigorous solar wind from the early Sun. Most of the Earth’s early atmosphere was lost due to the vigorous solar wind from the early Sun. Continuous volcanic eruptions built a new atmosphere of: Continuous volcanic eruptions built a new atmosphere of: water vapor carbon dioxide nitrogenmethane

48 The Atmosphere The mixture of gases known as air, protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet radiation and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. The mixture of gases known as air, protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet radiation and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. The atmosphere is not static. Interactions involving the amount of sunlight, the spin of the planet and tilt of the Earth’s axis cause ever changing atmospheric conditions. The atmosphere is not static. Interactions involving the amount of sunlight, the spin of the planet and tilt of the Earth’s axis cause ever changing atmospheric conditions. The auroras occur in the thermosphere and are caused by interactions between the Earth’s atmosphere and charged particles streaming from the Sun. Weather occurs in the troposphere. Gaseous water molecules held together by intermolecular forces cause the formation of clouds.

49 Air Density

50 The atmosphere consists of several layers with different temperatures, pressures, and compositions. The atmosphere consists of several layers with different temperatures, pressures, and compositions.

51 STRUCTURE AND SCIENCE The atmosphere’s innermost layer (troposphere) is made up mostly of nitrogen and oxygen, with smaller amounts of water vapor and CO 2. The atmosphere’s innermost layer (troposphere) is made up mostly of nitrogen and oxygen, with smaller amounts of water vapor and CO 2. Ozone in the atmosphere’s second layer (stratosphere) filters out most of the sun’s UV radiation that is harmful to us and most other species. Ozone in the atmosphere’s second layer (stratosphere) filters out most of the sun’s UV radiation that is harmful to us and most other species.

52 The Atmosphere Earth's atmosphere contains roughly : Earth's atmosphere contains roughly : The Earth’s atmosphere (where pressure becomes negligible) is over 140 km thick. Compared to the bulk of the planet, this is an extremely thin barrier between the hospitable and the inhospitable. 78% nitrogen 20.95% oxygen 0.93% argon 0.038% carbon dioxide Trace gases 1% water vapour All images: NASA

53 Troposphere 75% of mass of atmosphere 75% of mass of atmosphere 0 to 11 miles in altitude 0 to 11 miles in altitude 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen 78% nitrogen, 21% oxygen Location of Earth’s weather Location of Earth’s weather Temperature decreases with altitude until the next layer is reached, where there is a sudden rise in temperature Temperature decreases with altitude until the next layer is reached, where there is a sudden rise in temperature

54 Stratosphere 11 miles to 30 miles in altitude, calm 11 miles to 30 miles in altitude, calm Temperature increases with altitude Temperature increases with altitude Contains 1000x the ozone of the rest of the atmosphere; ozone forms in an equilibrium reaction when oxygen is converted to O 3 by lightning and/or sunlight Contains 1000x the ozone of the rest of the atmosphere; ozone forms in an equilibrium reaction when oxygen is converted to O 3 by lightning and/or sunlight 99% of ultraviolet radiation (especially UV-B) is absorbed by the stratosphere 99% of ultraviolet radiation (especially UV-B) is absorbed by the stratosphere

55 Mesosphere & Thermosphere Mesosphere Mesosphere 30 to 50 miles in altitude 30 to 50 miles in altitude Temperature decreases with increasing altitude Temperature decreases with increasing altitude Thermosphere Thermosphere 50 to 75 miles in altitude 50 to 75 miles in altitude Temperature increases with increasing altitude Temperature increases with increasing altitude Very high temperatures Very high temperatures

56 Composition of the Atmosphere Components –Nitrogen 78%, Oxygen 21%,.93% argon, &.038% carbon Components –Nitrogen 78%, Oxygen 21%,.93% argon, &.038% carbon Layers – troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere, exosphere (extends from 310 miles to interplanetary space) Layers – troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere, exosphere (extends from 310 miles to interplanetary space)

57 Heat Transfer Conduction Conduction Warm air holds more moisture than cold air. During conduction, heat & moisture from the ocean or land moves into the atmosphere. Warm air holds more moisture than cold air. During conduction, heat & moisture from the ocean or land moves into the atmosphere. Ex. cold air moving over warm water (like a lake), forming steam fog. Ex. cold air moving over warm water (like a lake), forming steam fog. Radiation Radiation Radiation drives weather. Heat from the sun warms the earth, which radiates the heat back into the atmosphere. Radiation drives weather. Heat from the sun warms the earth, which radiates the heat back into the atmosphere. Convection Convection Air & water movement Air & water movement

58 Natural Greenhouse Effect Some of the solar energy is trapped by molecules of greenhouse gases (water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane). Otherwise earth would be much colder Some of the solar energy is trapped by molecules of greenhouse gases (water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane). Otherwise earth would be much colder

59 Global Warming Considerable scientific evidence and climate models indicate that large inputs of greenhouse gases from anthropogenic activities into the troposphere can enhance the natural greenhouse effect and change the earth’s climate in your lifetime. Considerable scientific evidence and climate models indicate that large inputs of greenhouse gases from anthropogenic activities into the troposphere can enhance the natural greenhouse effect and change the earth’s climate in your lifetime.

60 Coriolis Effect The spinning of the earth creates The spinning of the earth creates Different wind speeds at different latitudes (faster at equator, slower at poles) Different wind speeds at different latitudes (faster at equator, slower at poles) clockwise winds in the northern hemisphere clockwise winds in the northern hemisphere counter clockwise winds in the southern hemisphere counter clockwise winds in the southern hemisphere This movement is called the Coriolis Effect. This movement is called the Coriolis Effect. Watch: https://www.classzone.com/bo oks/earth_science/terc/content/ visualizations/es1904/es1904pa ge01.cfm?chapter_no=visualiza tion Watch: https://www.classzone.com/bo oks/earth_science/terc/content/ visualizations/es1904/es1904pa ge01.cfm?chapter_no=visualiza tion https://www.classzone.com/bo oks/earth_science/terc/content/ visualizations/es1904/es1904pa ge01.cfm?chapter_no=visualiza tion https://www.classzone.com/bo oks/earth_science/terc/content/ visualizations/es1904/es1904pa ge01.cfm?chapter_no=visualiza tion N. hemisphere - CLOCKWISE S. hemisphere - COUNTER - CLOCKWISE

61 Coriolis and Convection cells Without the Coriolis Effect, air would travel in two large cells. The warm air at the equator would rise and move toward the poles. As it moved to the poles, it would cool and sink, then move back to the equator along land, warming as it moved. DOES NOT ACTUALLY HAPPEN With the Coriolis Effect, air still travels from the equator toward the poles, but due to the wind patterns, the 2 cells are broken into 6 global cells. Warm air rises in each cell and cools as it travels through the atmosphere, then sinks and warms as it travels across the land.

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63 Climate Changes with Latitude Starting at the equator and moving to the poles it generally: Starting at the equator and moving to the poles it generally: gets colder and drier gets colder and drier There are exceptions particularly for rainfall!

64 Biomes – observe latitude similarities

65 Climate Changes with Elevation/Altitude As you go up in elevation: As you go up in elevation: Less soil and less nutrients  less plants Less soil and less nutrients  less plants Less oxygen Less oxygen lower air pressure  thinner atmosphere  less organisms lower air pressure  thinner atmosphere  less organisms Temperatures decreases Temperatures decreases More UV rays – limits plant growth More UV rays – limits plant growth

66 Ocean Currents: Transport nutrients and heat all over the globe Also called the Ocean Conveyor belt Driven mostly by: Driven mostly by: Wind/Coriolis Wind/Coriolis Temperature gradients (colder water sinks) THERMO Temperature gradients (colder water sinks) THERMO Salinity gradients (saltier water sinks) HALINE Salinity gradients (saltier water sinks) HALINE

67 Occur when ocean currents pull water from the deep ocean up to the surface Occur when ocean currents pull water from the deep ocean up to the surface Upwellings pull cold, nutrient rich water up to the surface Upwellings pull cold, nutrient rich water up to the surface Good for fishing: increases NPP as nutrients are often a limiting factor Good for fishing: increases NPP as nutrients are often a limiting factor Upwelling

68 Gyres Direction driven by the Coriolis Effect and the continents 5 gyres that spin clockwise in the N. hemisphere and counter clockwise in the S. hemisphere Redistribute heat and nutrients Upwellings occur along the west coasts of continents

69 Ocean Currents Ocean Currents There are two types of Ocean Currents: There are two types of Ocean Currents: 1. Surface Currents / Surface Circulation These waters make up about 10% of all the water in the ocean. These waters make up about 10% of all the water in the ocean. These waters are the upper 400 meters of the ocean. These waters are the upper 400 meters of the ocean. Driven mostly by wind Driven mostly by wind 2. Deep Water Currents These waters make up the other 90% of the ocean These waters make up the other 90% of the ocean move around the ocean basins by density and gravity. move around the ocean basins by density and gravity. The density difference is a function of different temperatures and salinity The density difference is a function of different temperatures and salinity These deep waters sink into the deep ocean basins at high latitudes where the temperatures are cold enough to cause the density to increase. These deep waters sink into the deep ocean basins at high latitudes where the temperatures are cold enough to cause the density to increase.

70 El Nino Southern Oscillation El Nino Southern Oscillation

71 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO): periodic weather pattern in the Pacific

72 El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) El Nino – warming event in the tropical Pacific Ocean El Nino – warming event in the tropical Pacific Ocean Caused by weak/no trade winds blowing WEST Caused by weak/no trade winds blowing WEST The upwelling along the west coast of the Americas stops The upwelling along the west coast of the Americas stops Occurs in cycles every 2-7 years Occurs in cycles every 2-7 years La Nina – cooling event in the tropical Pacific Ocean La Nina – cooling event in the tropical Pacific Ocean The opposite end of the spectrum as an El Nino The opposite end of the spectrum as an El Nino Trade winds and upwelling is strong Trade winds and upwelling is strong Both extremes cause extreme weather events globally Both extremes cause extreme weather events globally

73 ENSO effects – El Nino During an El Nino event During an El Nino event Warmer ocean temps in the Pacific Warmer ocean temps in the Pacific Warmer and wetter in the western Americas from So. Cal south (Warmer and dryer in the Northwest US during winter and warmer and wetter in the summer) Warmer and wetter in the western Americas from So. Cal south (Warmer and dryer in the Northwest US during winter and warmer and wetter in the summer) Suppresses hurricane activity in the Atlantic ocean Suppresses hurricane activity in the Atlantic ocean Major declining in fishing populations during an El Nino Major declining in fishing populations during an El Nino Drought in the western Pacific and Australia Drought in the western Pacific and Australia

74 ENSO effects – La Nina During a La Nina event During a La Nina event Pacific ocean temps are colder than normal Pacific ocean temps are colder than normal Droughts along the west coast of the Americas (more snow in northwest US) Droughts along the west coast of the Americas (more snow in northwest US) Active hurricane season in the Atlantic Active hurricane season in the Atlantic More rain in the Western Pacific and Australia More rain in the Western Pacific and Australia


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