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Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss the general rules to be followed during the classroom session and explain.

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Presentation on theme: "Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss the general rules to be followed during the classroom session and explain."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss the general rules to be followed during the classroom session and explain that adherence to these guidelines will enable the entire class to focus on learning without disruptions and meet the learning objectives effectively. 1. Please turn off or turn the volume off on pagers and cell phones to eliminate disruptions. Be respectful of other participants and check or cell phones only during breaks. 2. Please be on time and follow the training schedule. We’ll take a ten-minute break approximately every two hours; please return from breaks promptly. This will help manage activities by starting and stopping sessions on time. 3. Let’s minimise side conversations so we can all hear the speaker clearly. 4. Please feel free to ask a question anytime throughout the course. Questions that cannot be answered immediately will be noted down and answered later.

3 Prerequisites Learners should be familiar with:
The End-User Type 1 (Business Management) Training The End-User Type 2 (Operations) Training Some experience in facilitating sessions or addressing a group (preferable) Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: State that this course is focused on teaching Facilitation Skills and that participants are expected to be familiar with the basic concepts and terminology associated with the End-User Training (both Type 1 and 2). Participants are also expected to have a some elementary experience in facilitation, training or addressing a group. It would be a good idea to ask students to raise their hands in order to gauge the percentage of the audience that meets the above prerequisites.

4 At the end of this module you will be able to
structure your presentation to deliver your key messages. utilise your nervous energy positively. maximise your voice projection to create impact. develop and display a positive and appropriate body language. design and use visual aids to support your message. deliver presentations effectively. incorporate tips that you have learnt to enhance your facilitation style. use the facilitation planning checklist. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Welcome the participants. Ask them their reasons for attending this training. Share the objectives of the training.

5 What are some things that make learning effective?
Share personal experiences of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ training. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Start a discussion on ‘things that make learning effective’. Encourage the participants to share actual experiences of ‘good’ and ‘bad’ training.

6 What’s In It For Me (WIIFM)
Confident and professional outcome Enhanced credibility Increased levels of comfort while facilitating Awareness of and expertise in global facilitation standards Facilitator Notes: Explanation: WIIFM establishes the reason for the session and reinforces the need for the participant’s presence. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Elicit the WIIFM by initiating a discussion. Probe with questions (closed questions) to keep the discussion on track.

7 Facilitation Skills: Definition
Ability to guide people through processes towards agreed upon objectives in a manner that encourages participation, ownership and creativity by all involved. Helping learners think through what they want and enabling and empowering them to achieve it. Ancient Wisdom: Tell me and I will forget Show me and I may remember Involve me and I will understand Facilitator Notes: Explanation: Definition & Importance of Presentation - “A structured , prepared and speech-based means of communicating information, ideas, or arguments to a group of interested people in order to inform or persuade them” To inform, inspire, entertain, demonstrate ,prove and to persuade, that is an objective of a good presentation. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Ask the participants on what skills/ qualities are necessary to make one an effective facilitator. Move to the definition above and the 3 points of Tell, Show and Involve.

8 Facilitation: Key Components
Begin Learn & Motivate Plan Structure Attributes Deliver Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This slide outlines the structure/ main topics that are covered in this workshop. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Tell the participants that each of these topics would be covered during the session, in detail. Tell the class that any questions that arise upon showing this slide, should be kept in the ‘parking lot’, as they would in all likelihood, get answered in the subsequent slides. If not, they would be addressed at the end of the session.

9 Facilitation: Key Components
Learn & Motivate Learn & Motivate Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

10 Learn & Motivate LEARNING People learn best when they are motivated
Motivation Strategy Goals People learn best when they are motivated Broadly speaking, motivation is either intrinsic/ expressive or extrinsic/ instrumental Different goal orientations dictate behaviors Behaviors condition responses defining varied levels of achievement Without motivation, learning is fragmented and incomplete Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: Motivation is either intrinsic/ expressive (doing something for its own sake) or extrinsic/ instrumental (doing something for some other reason). Intrinsic refers to doing something for its own sake or satisfaction derived directly from understanding of a concept or new skill acquired. Extrinsic, on the other hand, refers to doing something for some other tangible reason, possibly a reward, like a promotion, salary hike or to avoid negative consequences like a low or negative appraisal rating. Goals promote planning to determine how goals will be achieved. Employees often set goals in order to satisfy a need; thus, goals can be motivational and increase performance. For instance, goals of a participant with a technical background would differ from that of a participant with sales experience. The first would have specific technical questions to enhance his/ her understanding of an application whereas the second, would ideally want to know the features/ value addition of that application so that he/ she could sell better. Goals + Strategy + Motivation = Learning. Learning would be incomplete without any of the 3 components. In any learning environment, one needs to have clearly defined goals, well designed and structured content and session flow as well as motivation to learn to a achieve higher level of learning outcome. Facilitation Tips: Spend some time explaining the 4th point in the Facilitator Notes as this is the main element of the slide. Pay attention to the concepts of ‘intrinsic’ and ‘extrinsic’ motivation so that the audience is able to clearly distinguish the two.

11 Facilitation: Key Components
Begin Begin Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

12 Begin: Back To Basics The first few minutes in front of the audience could decide the acceptance as well as set the tone for the rest of the training. It is therefore very crucial to plan your session and structure your topics points effectively. Thumb Rule: Every 5 minutes of presentation need 30 minutes of preparation Carry the Facilitator Guides, Cue Cards, Participant Guides, etc. Check all A-V equipment 24 prior to the start of the session Print and carry the Agenda/ Training Plan Check logistics 48 hours prior to the start of the session Print and carry a list of the participants along with their contact numbers Carry props for activities …..refer to the embedded file for the detailed list Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: As listed in the Ready Reckoner. Facilitation Tips: Discuss on what are some of the things that could possibly go wrong during a training session and arrive to why we need to plan effectively. Introduce the ‘Ready Reckoner’ checklist and discuss the actions that need to be taken before, during and after each training session.

13 Facilitation: Key Components
Plan Plan Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

14 Plan: Session Overview and Outline
Articulate the objectives Formulate a simple, concise yet precise statement of intent Link them to the business goals Identify/ Analyse the audience Know your audience and their profiles, Understand their work experience and educational background Analyse their learning styles and adapt your delivery style accordingly Define the structure Translate your objectives into a definite format Incorporate the Walker Cycle into your session plan Sequence the topics Sequence your topics in a logical flow Start with the basics and ultimately leading to a conclusion Prepare the collateral Prepare administrative material like Facilitator Guides, Cue Cards, Participant Guides, etc. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: Articulate the Objectives The starting point in planning any speech is to formulate a precise objective. This should take the form of a simple, concise statement of intent. Focus is key. If you do not focus upon your objective, it is unlikely that the audience will. Identify the Audience The next task is to consider the audience to determine how best to achieve your objectives in the context of these people. Essentially this is done by identifying. Their aims and objectives while attending your presentation. Define structure All presentations should have a definite structure or format; a talk without a structure is a woolly mess. If you do not order your thoughts into a structured manner, the audience will not be able to follow them.  Sequential Argument One of the simplest structures is that of sequential argument which consists of a series of linked statements ultimately leading to a conclusion. However, this simplicity can only be achieved by careful and deliberate delineation between each section. Prepare the collateral Prepare administrative material like Facilitator Guides, Cue Cards, Participant Guides, etc. as these enhance learning. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss on what are some of the key points that need to be considered while planning a session.

15 Facilitation: Key Components
Structure Structure Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

16 Information Application
Structure: Session Flow (Contd…) Walker Cycle Mind Jog Personal Connect Information Exchange Information Application Real World Connect Establish the topic Bring the focus Awaken the interest Test learning Test productivity Assess readiness (real) Get buy-in Increase interest Enhance participation Facilitator Notes: Explanation: Mind Jog refers to an activity, could be a discussion, a game or a quiz that firstly introduces the topic and secondly brings the participants’ attention to the topic that would follow. Personal Connect establishes the benefit a participant would get from actively participating during the session. Information Exchange is the exchange of concepts and experience with the help of learning aids to reiterate key points Information Application refers to the hands-on application for participants through activities, role-plays, simulations. This is the ideal time for participants to apply concepts and test it to understanding possible defects and thereafter, get possible fixes. Real World Connect relates to applying the learning to enhance productivity while on-the-job. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss how the Walker Cycle helps the facilitator structure any form of classroom-based sessions. Illustrate each step with an example so that the purpose of performing that step becomes clear (refer to the next slide). Reinforce concepts Check learning Assess readiness (test) Introduce concepts Facilitate learning

17 Structure: Session Flow (Contd…) Walker Cycle
Mind Jog Focuses the attention of the audience to the topic at hand This could be a question for discussion, a game, a quiz or a leadership address Personal Connect Establishes a WIIFM (What’s In It For Me) States reason for being there and the benefits (short & long term) Information Exchange Exchanges information with concepts being shared, explained and discussed Learning aids/ tools are used to emphasize concepts Information Application Practices hands-on through role-plays, simulations, or any practical experience The test environment is ideal and is a good ‘choke-point’ as well Real World Connect Relates to what you are learning to the work and productivity Actual application of concepts in a real environment Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Transition smoothly from the previous slide linking the concept headers with the details on this slide.

18 Structure: Session Layout
Beginning "Tell them what you’re going to tell them“ Short introduction - welcome your audience - build rapport - introduce your subject - explain the structure of your presentation - set expectations and explain ground rules Middle “Tell them" Body of presentation - points to be made - support material, examples, references, visual aids - possible audience objections/ queries End "Tell them what you’ve told them" Short conclusion - summarise your presentation - thank your audience - invite questions Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss on how a facilitator needs to begin the session, state points with material, visual aids, etc. and end the session with summarising key learning points Walk through the three sections --- Beginning, Middle and End, explaining the need for each section emphasizing on the logical flow and smooth transition between the steps.

19 Facilitation: Key Components
Deliver Deliver Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

20 Deliver: Dealing with Questions
Asking Questions (3-P technique) Pose – ask or rephrase the question and pose it to the audience Pause – pause for a few seconds after posing the question Person –pick a person to answer the question **The reverse, is also applicable. Answering Questions (3-S approach) State - state the answer Support – support it with facts or an example Summarise – summarise the key points State Support Summarise Pose Person Pause Facilitator Notes: Explanation: Question-answer is one of the most effective ways to clarify concepts during a session. Explain the preferred techniques and methods to use this effectively. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss the different ways to handle questions that are posed to the facilitator by participants and vice versa.

21 Deliver: Signposting Signposting helps your audience to know:
where they are, what is the structure of the presentation and what is coming next. Questions show deeper interest in the subject. Welcome them! If structured successfully, they can be used to: introduce concepts, clarify doubts and enhance participative learning. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: When you give a presentation, Signposting helps your audience to know: Where they are What is the structure of the presentation What is coming next During your introduction, you should tell your audience what the structure of your presentation will be. You might say something like this: "I'll start by describing the current position in Europe. Then I'll move on to some of the achievements we've made in Asia. After that I'll consider the opportunities we see for further expansion in Africa. Lastly, I'll quickly recap before concluding with some recommendations." A member of the audience can now visualise your presentation like this: Introduction -Welcome -Explanation of structure (now) Body -Europe -Asia -Africa Conclusion -Summing up -Recommendations More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss on how signposting helps the participant relate to where they are in the session, what they are currently doing, and what’s coming next. Discuss how to use questions to make a session more interactive and interesting.

22 Deliver: Reflect-Deflect Technique
Use class dynamics in your favor Utilise the experience in the room Throw it back to the class When all else fails….. Reflect ADMIT NOTE COMMIT & HONOR RESEARCH LEARN Facilitator Notes: Explanation: When this technique fails … 1. Admit - admit that you do not know the answer. 2. Note - make a note of the question (parking lot). 3. Commit & Honor - commit to a time for when you will revert and honor it. 4. Research - research or ask and get back with the answer. 5. Learn - learn from the experience, this would help answer similar questions for future session. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Explain the Reflect-Deflect Technique and demonstrate using examples. You are not required to know EVERYTHING, just ENOUGH to be credible!

23 Deliver: Helpful Tips Punctuality Professionalism Positivity Patience
Be the first to arrive at the venue of the training and the last one to leave. Clarify the objectives, WIIFM, expectations and ground rules at the start of the training. Use Cue Cards as ‘help’, avoid referring frequently to the Facilitator Guide. Know the name of each participant and address them appropriately. Use the floor effectively to reach out to all the participants. Modulate the tone and pitch of your voice to ensure maximise clarity and projection. Exhibit positive and confident body language to enhance facilitation style. Punctuality Professionalism Positivity Patience Facilitation Tips: Explanation: NA More Information: If using a PowerPoint presentation, avoid reading from the slides, PDF/ word document, instead discuss the essence of content. Where possible, use mix of medium like whiteboard, flipcharts, chart paper, slides, handouts, etc. to bring in variation. Use activities, stories, role-plays to reinforce your key concepts. Maintain high levels of energy throughout the session to maximise learning. Listen actively-Pause effectively-Respond appropriately. Encourage participation and group activities to add interest to the session. Be approachable and available to answer questions and clarify doubts. Follow-up to ensure compliance with assignments, projects and assessments. Go through the points to remember while delivering a session. Demonstrate, where applicable. Refer to the additional points in the Facilitator Notes to share more ‘Helpful Tips’.

24 Facilitation: Key Components
Attributes Attributes Facilitator Notes: Explanation: This is a lead-in slide indicating that this is the section that will now be explained. More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: NA

25 Attributes: Grooming - Body Language - Building Confidence
Look at the whole picture and check every element of your appearance, starting at your head and ending at your feet. Be well groomed, follow effective personal hygiene. Wear well-pressed clothes choosing fabrics that do not crease easily. Opt for neutral/ pastel shades, avoid bright colors. Accessorise minimally keeping in mind the professional environment. For men, wearing a tie is mandatory. Wear formal, well-polished shoes. Be comfortable with your choice of attire (style, fit, etc.) Well groomed people convey the right message in a professional environment. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Discuss the dress code for work place and the importance of being well-groomed for a training session. Talk about ‘first impressions’ and how they are sometime lasting impressions. Mention the connection between dress and professionalism.

26 Attributes: Grooming - Body Language - Building Confidence
Body Language is: The language of the sub-conscious A reflex, therefore difficult to control or condition More reliable than verbal communication Culture-bound and internalised by us Read in clusters and not in isolation 1. Stand tall with shoulders back 2. Sweep the class with eyes 3. Walk the floor 4. Maintain eye contact, briefly 5. Use hands to emphasize (T-zone only) 6. Use verbal nods 7. Smile 1. Slouch 2. Put hands in pockets 3. Lock arms across the chest 4. Fidget with clothes, stationary, phone, etc. 5. Point at anyone 6. Touch your face/ ears/ hair 7. Make rude gestures/ faces DO DON’T Facilitator Notes: Explanation: Body language is any type of non-verbal communication. We display and interpret body language at a subconscious level. Body posture, gestures and expressions determine our moods and thoughts. By observing ones’ body language we can understand how he/ she communicates, and how their words may differ from their actual meaning. It is, at times, difficult to control such as raising eyebrows when surprised, or clenching of the jaw when angry. Certain body language is the same in all people, for example smiling and frowning but some body language is specific to a culture or ethnic group (use of hands, finger-pointing, moving of the head in agreement/ disagreement, etc.). Personal space preferences (distances inside which a person is uncomfortable when someone encroaches) can vary between people of different ethnicity. When reading the body language of the participants, one needs to observe signals in clusters and not in isolation. If read in clusters of participants looking away, not making eye contact, then that would depict boredom. If read in isolation of a participant touching/ rubbing face or with crossed arms, then could also be a habit. . More Information: Tell-tale signs of an inattentive audience: Looking down, not making eye contact, looking away, depicts boredom. Touching or rubbing the face, hand or hair indicates irritation & disassociation. Eyes glazing over and look at the screen, yawn indicates boredom & sleepiness. Flipping through their notes indicates inattention and disconnect with class. Sighing heavily depicts boredom & disassociation. Laying back in the chair and crossing their arms indicates disinterest. Scanning across the room, whispering or tapping their feet indicates boredom. Facilitation Tips: Emphasise that these signs of body language must be read/ interpreted in clusters along with other behaviour, and not individually. Initiate a discussion on some of the common body language manifestations. Discuss the ‘Tell-tale signs of an inattentive audience’ in the Facilitator Notes.

27 Attributes: Grooming - Body Language - Building Confidence
Self-Confidence comes from several sources: From within yourself From others From your achievements Some people appear naturally confident but guess what, they have learnt how to be that way and so can you! If you lack self-confidence you must look for the reasons. You may be overly criticising yourself or telling yourself negative things like "I'm bound to fail" or "I'm not good enough" or even "I don't deserve to succeed". These will make failure likely and almost evident! CONFIDENCE AMBITION HIGHER GOALS MOTIVATION SUCCESS Facilitator Notes: Explanation: From the quietly confident doctor whose advice we rely on, to the charismatic confidence of an inspiring speaker, self-confident people have qualities that everyone admires. Self-confidence is extremely important in almost every aspect of our lives, yet so many people struggle to find it. Sadly, this can be a vicious circle: People who lack self-confidence can find it difficult to become successful. After all, most people are reluctant to back a project that's being pitched by someone who was nervous, fumbling and overly apologetic. On the other hand, you might be persuaded by someone who speaks clearly, who holds his or her head high, who answers questions assuredly, and who readily admits when he or she does not know something. Self-confident people inspire confidence in others: their audience, their peers, their bosses, their customers, and their friends. And gaining the confidence of others is one of the key ways in which a self-confident person finds success. The good news is that self-confidence really can be learned and built on. And, whether you’re working on your own self-confidence or building the confidence of people around you, it’s well-worth the effort! More Information: Some of the common things that we tend to do that undermine our confidence: Labeling – fixing a permanent category for yourself, usually something derogatory (example: “I’m ugly”, “I’m hopeless”, etc.). These are generalisations, be more specific; say – “That didn’t work out how I would have liked”. Blaming – assigning blame to people and events, not accepting responsibility (example: “If only my parents had been richer”, “she makes me feel inferior”, etc.). Accept ownership of outcomes that don’t go in your favor; move out of the ‘victim’ mode and remember, ONLY YOU make the choice to LET IT AFFECT YOU! Negative Thoughts – Thinking the worst of every situation; magnifying a small miss to mammoth proportions (example: “I messed up the report, my whole day is a mess”, “I burnt the dinner, it’s the worst day ever”, etc.). Find the little bit of ‘good’ in the situation; say – “the dinners was burnt but I’m pretty sure of what not to do next time onwards”). Personalising – blaming yourself for everything that goes wrong (“It’s my fault”, etc.). It takes two to tango! You can’t take credit for all the wrongs! Cut yourself some slack. Making Comparisons – comparing yourself with others to magnify their positives and your negatives (example: “I will not get the promotion as I am and introvert, Maria is a go-getter she will get it”, etc.). Change these thought; You are a unique person so stop comparing and start appreciating yourself. Can’t Cope – selling yourself short (example: “I can’t take this”, “I can’t stand the humiliation”, etc.). Telling yourself that you are not good enough is not positive; challenge the situation, say – “I don’t like it but I will face it”. Facilitation Tips: This should be an interactive discussion. Elicit personal experience for each of the six points in the Facilitator Notes.

28 Attributes: Grooming - Body Language - Building Confidence (Contd…)
Some tips on Building Self-confidence: Identify your achievements: Discover what you have achieved so far. Take pride of the things at which you have excelled. Set goals and achieve them: Think of what you want in life and set goals that exploit your strengths. Get in the habit of achieving the small steps and celebrating them. It will help you to believe in yourself and your ability and makes you more confident. Take risks: Be willing to take risk and take up new challenges as opportunities to learn. Think positive: Positive thinking brings inner peace, happiness and a sense of wellbeing. So take control of your mind and be optimistic. From within yourself From others From your achievements If you lack self-confidence, look for the reasons. You may be overly criticising yourself or telling yourself negative things like "I'm bound to fail" or "I'm not good enough" or even "I don't deserve to succeed". These will make failure likely and almost evident! Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: Some more tips on Building Self-confidence: Learn to calm yourself: Try to face every situation calmly. Take time to relax, meditate and other activities like listening to music, going for a walk that makes you feel better. Fake it: Pretend that you are confident even if you don't feel so. Acting confident might actually make you believe it and you will be surprised how nice this makes you feel. Good posture: The way you carry yourself creates a lasting impression on your confidence. Always held your head high, walk straight and make eye contact while talking to people. And, smile often! Facilitation Tips: This should be an interactive discussion. Provide examples for each of the three points in the Facilitator Notes.

29 Link Learning and Motivation to get the desired results.
We have come to the end of the session. At this point you should be able to do the following: Link Learning and Motivation to get the desired results. Incorporate the basics in order to Begin each session successfully. Plan a session with an overview and outline. Structure your session using aspects of the Walker Cycle. Use various effective techniques to Deliver training. Infuse the Attributes of grooming, body language and self-confidence to add that extra edge to your sessions. Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Summarise the session as per the points on the slide. Remember to address any questions that have not been answered. Share details of the Teachback, etc. (if relevant).

30 Facilitator Notes: Explanation: NA More Information: NA Facilitation Tips: Encourage students to resolve their queries and clear their doubts (using examples where necessary), if they have any. It recommended that you go through all sections of the presentation in order to resolve learner queries.

31 Annexure

32 Attributes: Speaking in Public
Appearing credible and creating a positive perception: Appear relatively unbiased Appear similar to the audience Communicate in ways that the audience understands Demonstrate understanding of the audience’s opinions Do not sound defensive or aggressive Do not over react to criticism Prepare for your session Listen actively Maintain eye contact with your participants (sweep the room) Exhibit energy Customise learning to the needs of the class and the individual Facilitation Tips: Explanation: These are some things to remember to appear confident and to speak in a public, professional setting. One can inculcate one or more of these attributes/ behaviours to project confidence when addressing a group. More Information: NA Use this slide if there is extra time or if the audience needs this information (as per trainer assessment of audience needs). Walk through the points on the slide giving examples to clarify.


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