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Chapter 5 (9 questions) Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution, 1700–1775.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 5 (9 questions) Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution, 1700–1775."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 5 (9 questions) Colonial Society on the Eve of Revolution, 1700–1775

2 5 | 2 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 1 All of the following were true of the Scots-Irish who spearheaded the Regulator Movement EXCEPT a)they “kept the Sabbath—and all else they could lay their hands on.” b)they tended to fail as organized leaders, and few rose to prominence in American governments as a result. c)pugnacious, lawless, and individualistic, they dotted the Appalachian hills and hollows with their stills. d)they cherished no love for the British government that had uprooted them and still lorded over them—or for any other government.

3 5 | 3 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 2 All of the following were true of triangular trade EXCEPT a)it supported the mercantile policies in vogue throughout the burgeoning British Empire. b)it was infamously profitable, though small in relation to total colonial commerce. c)the most famous example was trading rum for slaves in West Africa, slaves for molasses in the West Indies, and molasses for rum in New England. d)it openly flouted the British Navigation Laws, which mandated that all American commerce be directed through the Mother country.

4 5 | 4 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 3 All of the following were true of the root of the Great Awakening EXCEPT a)it arose in part because religion was less fervid in the early eighteenth century than it had been a century earlier, when the colonies were first planted. b)churchgoers increasingly complained about the “dead dogs” who droned out tedious, over-erudite sermons from Puritan pulpits. c)some ministers worried that many of their parishioners had gone soft and that their souls were no longer kindled by the hellfire of orthodox Calvinism. d)it embraced the beliefs of some worshipers now that human beings might save themselves by good works.

5 5 | 5 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 4 All of the following were true of the Molasses Act EXCEPT a)Parliament bowed to pressure from influential British West Indian planters. b)it was aimed at squelching North American trade with the French West Indies. c)it struck a crippling blow to American international trade and to the colonists’ standard of living. d)American merchants responded to the act by bribing and smuggling their way around the law.

6 5 | 6 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 5 All of the following represent sentiments expressed in Poor Richard’s Almanack EXCEPT a)“A good example is the best sermon.” b)“Many have quarreled about religion that never practiced it.” c)“There is that of God in every man.” d)“Serving God is doing good to man, but praying is thought an easier service, and therefore more generally chosen.”

7 5 | 7 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 6 All of the following were true of the Zenger trial EXCEPT a)Zenger’s newspaper had assailed the corrupt royal governor. b)charged with seditious libel, Zenger was hauled into court. c)he was defended by a former indentured servant, now a distinguished Philadelphia lawyer, Andrew Hamilton. d)the jurors followed the judges’ instructions and returned a verdict of guilty.

8 5 | 8 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 7 The passage of British restrictions on trade encouraged colonial merchants to a)Organize political resistance in Parliament. b)Find ways to smuggle and otherwise evade the laws. c)Turn to domestic trade and develop a sense of self- sufficiency. d)Turn from trading to fishing and the development of industry.

9 5 | 9 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 8 A primary weapon used by colonial legislatures in their conflicts with royal governors was a)Extending the franchise to include almost all adult white male citizens. b)Passing laws prohibiting the governors from owning land or industries. c)Voting them out of office. d)Using their power of the purse to withhold the governors’ salaries.

10 5 | 10 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Question 9 All of the following were true of Jonathan Edwards EXCEPT a)the Awakening was first ignited in Northampton, Massachusetts, by this tall, delicate, and intellectual pastor. b)he was the deepest theological mind ever nurtured in America. c)he rejected the belief that hell was “paved with the skulls of unbaptized children.” d)“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” was the title of one of his most famous sermons.

11 5 | 11 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 1 All of the following were true of the Scots-Irish who spearheaded the Regulator Movement EXCEPT a)they “kept the Sabbath—and all else they could lay their hands on.” b)they tended to fail as organized leaders, and few rose to prominence in American governments as a result. (correct) c)pugnacious, lawless, and individualistic, they dotted the Appalachian hills and hollows with their stills. d)they cherished no love for the British government that had uprooted them and still lorded over them—or for any other government. Hint: See page 90.

12 5 | 12 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 2 All of the following were true of triangular trade EXCEPT a)it supported the mercantile policies in vogue throughout the burgeoning British Empire. (correct) b)it was infamously profitable, though small in relation to total colonial commerce. c)the most famous example was trading rum for slaves in West Africa, slaves for molasses in the West Indies, and molasses for rum in New England. d)it openly flouted the British Navigation Laws, which mandated that all American commerce be directed through the Mother country. Hint: See page 94.

13 5 | 13 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 3 All of the following were true of the root of the Great Awakening EXCEPT a)it arose in part because religion was less fervid in the early eighteenth century than it had been a century earlier, when the colonies were first planted. b)churchgoers increasingly complained about the “dead dogs” who droned out tedious, over-erudite sermons from Puritan pulpits. c)some ministers worried that many of their parishioners had gone soft and that their souls were no longer kindled by the hellfire of orthodox Calvinism. d)it embraced the beliefs of some worshipers now that human beings might save themselves by good works. (correct) Hint: See page 98.

14 5 | 14 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 4 All of the following were true of the Molasses Act EXCEPT a)Parliament bowed to pressure from influential British West Indian planters. b)it was aimed at squelching North American trade with the French West Indies. c)it struck a crippling blow to American international trade and to the colonists’ standard of living. (correct) d)American merchants responded to the act by bribing and smuggling their way around the law. Hint: See page 96.

15 5 | 15 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 5 All of the following represent sentiments expressed in Poor Richard’s Almanack EXCEPT a)“A good example is the best sermon.” b)“Many have quarreled about religion that never practiced it.” c)“There is that of God in every man.” (correct) d)“Serving God is doing good to man, but praying is thought an easier service, and therefore more generally chosen.” Hint: See page 98.

16 5 | 16 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 6 All of the following were true of the Zenger trial EXCEPT a)Zenger’s newspaper had assailed the corrupt royal governor. b)charged with seditious libel, Zenger was hauled into court. c)he was defended by a former indentured servant, now a distinguished Philadelphia lawyer, Andrew Hamilton. d)the jurors followed the judges’ instructions and returned a verdict of guilty. (correct) Hint: See pages 103–104.

17 5 | 17 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 7 The passage of British restrictions on trade encouraged colonial merchants to a)Organize political resistance in Parliament. b)Find ways to smuggle and otherwise evade the laws. (correct) c)Turn to domestic trade and develop a sense of self- sufficiency. d)Turn from trading to fishing and the development of industry. Hint: See page

18 5 | 18 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 8 A primary weapon used by colonial legislatures in their conflicts with royal governors was a)Extending the franchise to include almost all adult white male citizens. b)Passing laws prohibiting the governors from owning land or industries. c)Voting them out of office. d)Using their power of the purse to withhold the governors’ salaries. (correct) Hint: See page 104.

19 5 | 19 Copyright © Cengage Learning. All rights reserved. Answer 9 All of the following were true of Jonathan Edwards EXCEPT a)the Awakening was first ignited in Northampton, Massachusetts, by this tall, delicate, and intellectual pastor. b)he was the deepest theological mind ever nurtured in America. c)he rejected the belief that hell was “paved with the skulls of unbaptized children.” (correct) d)“Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” was the title of one of his most famous sermons. Hint: See page 99.


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