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Elaboration or: Semantic Analysis Compiler Baojian Hua

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Presentation on theme: "Elaboration or: Semantic Analysis Compiler Baojian Hua"— Presentation transcript:

1 Elaboration or: Semantic Analysis Compiler Baojian Hua

2 Front End source code abstract syntax tree lexical analyzer parser tokens IR semantic analyzer

3 Elaboration Also known as type-checking, or semantic analysis context-sensitive analysis Checking the context-sensitive property of programs (AST): every variable is declared before use every expression has a proper type function calls conform to definitions all other possible context-sensitive info’ (highly language-dependent) …

4 Elaboration Example // Sample C code: void f (int *p) { x += 4; p (23); “hello” + “world”; } int main () { f () + 5; break; } What errors can be detected here?

5 Conceptually AST Intermediate Code Elaborator Language Semantics

6 Semantics Traditionally, semantics takes the form of natural language specification e.g., for the “+” operator, both the left and right operands should be of “integer” type refer to various specifications But recent research has revealed that semantics can also be addressed via math rigorous and clean

7 Semantics Now let ’ s turn to Macqueen ’ s note … How to implement these rules?

8 Language T-SLP // Let’s make the SLP typed: T-SLP P -> DS S DS -> T id; DS | T -> bool | int S -> S ; S | id := E | print (E) | printBool (E) E -> id | num | E+E | E&&E | true | false variable declarations followed by statements two types: “ bool ” and “ int ” print a “ bool ” value print an “ integer ” value both the two sub-expressions must be booleans

9 Symbol Tables In order to keep track of the types and other infos ’ we ’ d maintain a finite map of program symbols to info ’ symbols: variables, function names, etc. Such a mapping is called a symbol table, or sometimes an environment Notation: {x1: b1, x2: b2, …, xn: bn} where bi (1 ≤ i ≤ n) is called a binding

10 Type System Next, we write the symbol table as ∑ ∑=T1 x1; T2 x2; T3 x3; … a list of (T id) tuples may be empty Each rule takes the form of ∑  P1: T1 ∑   C : T ∑  Pn: Tn …

11 Type System: exp ∑   num: int T id ∈ ∑ ∑   id: T ∑  E1: bool ∑   E1&&E2: bool ∑  E2: bool ∑  E1: int ∑   E1+E2: int ∑  E2: int ∑   true: bool ∑   false: bool

12 Type System: stm ∑  E: bool ∑   printBool(E): OK ∑  E: int ∑   print(E): OK ∑  id: T ∑  |- id:=E: OK ∑  E: T

13 Type System: dec, prog  DS: ∑   DS S: OK ∑   : ∑ ∑ ; T id  DS: ∑ ’ ∑   T id; DS : ∑ ’ ∑  S: OK id ∈ dom( ∑ )

14 Example  int x; int y: ∑   int x; int y; print(x+y): OK ∑  print(x+y): OK ∑  x+y: int ∑  x: int ∑  y: int // Whether or not the following program is // well-typed? int x; int y; print (x+y); int x ∈ ∑int y ∈ ∑ int x  int y: ∑ int x; int y  : ∑

15 Elaboration of Expressions T elab_exp (sigma, num) = return int ∑  num: int

16 Elaboration of Expressions T elab_exp (sigma, true) = return bool ∑  true: bool

17 Elaboration of Expressions T elab_exp (sigma, false) = return bool ∑  false: bool

18 Elaboration of Expressions T elab_exp (sigma, id) = T ty = Table_lookup (sigma, id); if (ty==NULL) error (“variable not declared”); return ty; T id ∈ ∑ ∑  id : T

19 Elaboration of Expressions T elab_exp (sigma, e1+e2) = type t1 = elab_exp (sigma, e1) type t2 = elab_exp (sigma, e2) switch (t1, t2){ case (Int, Int): return Int; case (Int, _): error (“e2 should be int”) case(_, Int): error (“e1 should be int”) default: error (“should both be int”) } ∑  e1: int ∑  e2: int ∑  e1+e2: int

20 Elaboration of Expressions type elab_exp (sigma, e1&&e2) = type t1 = elab_exp (sigma, e1) type t2 = elab_exp (sigma, e2) switch (t1, t2){ case (Bool, Bool): return Bool; case (Bool, _): error(“e2 should be bool”) case(_, Bool): error(“e1 should be bool”) default: error (“should both be bool”) } ∑  e1: bool ∑  e2: bool ∑  e1&&e2: bool

21 Elaboration of Statements void elab_stm (sigma, x=e) = type t1 = elab_exp (sigma, x); type t2 = elab_exp (sigma, e); if (t1 != t2) error (“different types in assigment”); ∑  x: ty ∑  e: ty ∑  x:=e: OK

22 Elaboration of Statements void elab_stm (sigma, print(e)) = type ty = elab_exp (sigma, e) if (ty != INT) error (“type should be INT”); ∑  e: int ∑  print(e): OK

23 Elaboration of Statements void elab_stm (sigma, printBool(e)) = type ty = elab_exp (sigma, e) if (ty != BOOL) error (“type should be BOOL”); ∑  e: bool ∑  printBool(e): OK

24 Elaboration of Declarations Sigma elab_decs (sigma, decs) = if (decs==[]) return sigma; // decs = type ID; decs’ if (ID\in sigma) error (“duplicated decl”); new_sigma = enter_table (sigma, type ID) return elab_decs(new_sigma, decs’); ∑ ; type ID   decs: ∑ ’ ∑   type ID; decs: ∑ ’ ID ∈ dom( ∑ ) ∑   : ∑

25 Elaboration of Programs void elab_prog (decs stm) = sigma = elab_decs (decs); elab_stm (sigma, stm)   decs: ∑  ∑   decs stm: OK ∑   stm: OK

26 Moral There may be other information associated with identifiers, not just types, say: Scope Storage class Access control info ’ … All these details are handled by symbol tables (∑)!

27 Implementation Must be efficient! lots of variables, functions, etc Two basic approaches: Functional symbol table is implemented as a functional data structure (e.g., red-black tree), with no tables ever destroyed or modified Imperative a single table, modified for every binding added or removed This choice is largely independent of the implementation language

28 Functional Symbol Table Basic idea: when implementing σ2 = σ1 + {x:t} creating a new table σ2, instead of modifying σ1 when deleting, restore to the old table A good data structure for this is BST or red-black tree

29 BST Symbol Table c: int a: char b: double  e: int c: int ’’

30 Possible Functional Interface signature SYMBOL_TABLE = sig type ‘a t type key val empty: ‘a t val insert: ‘a t * key * ‘a -> ‘a t val lookup: ‘a t * key -> ‘a option end

31 Imperative Symbol Tables The imperative approach almost always involves the use of hash tables Need to delete entries to revert to previous environment made simpler because deletes follow a stack discipline can maintain a stack of entered symbols, so that they can be later popped and removed from the hash table

32 Possible Imperative Interface signature SYMBOL_TABLE = sig type ‘a t type key val insert: ‘a t * key * ‘a -> unit val lookup: ‘a t * key -> ‘a option val delete: ‘a t * key -> unit val beginScope: unit -> unit val endScope: unit -> unit end

33 Implementation of Symbols For several reasons, it will be useful at some point to represent symbols as elements of a small, densely packed set of identities fast comparisons (equality) for dataflow analysis, we will want sets of variables and fast set operations It will be critically important to use bit strings to represent the sets For example, your liveness analysis algorithm More on this later

34 Scope How to handle lexical scope? Many choices: One table + insert and remove bindings during elaboration, as we enters and leaves a local scope Stack of tables + insertion and removal always operated on stack-top dragon compiler makes use of this

35 One-table approach int x; σ={x:int} int f () σ1 = σ + {f:…} = {x:int, f:…} { if (4) { int x; σ2 = σ1 + {x:int} = {x:…, f:…, x:…} x = 6; } σ1 else { int x; σ4 = σ1 + {x:int} = {x:…, f:…, x:…} x = 5; } σ1 x = 8; } σ1 Shadowing: “ + ” is not commutative!

36 Name Space struct list { int x; struct list *list; } *list; void walk (struct list *list) { list: printf (“%d\n”, list->x); if (list = list->list) goto list; }

37 Name Space It ’ s trivial to handle name space one symbol table for each name space Take C as an example: Several different name spaces labels tags variables So …

38 Types The representation of types is highly language-dependent Some key considerations: name vs. structural equivalence mutually recursive type definitions errors handling

39 Name vs. Structural Equivalence In a language with structural equivalence, this program is legal But not in a language with name equivalence (e.g., C) For name equivalence, can generate a unique symbol for each defined type For structural equivalence, need to recursively compare the types struct A { int i; } x; struct B { int i; } y; x = y;

40 Mutually recursive type definitions To process recursive and mutually recursive type definitions, need a placeholder in ML, an option ref in C, a pointer in Java, bind method (read Appel) struct A { int data; struct A *next; struct B *b; }; struct B {…};

41 Error Diagnostic To recover from errors, it is useful to have an “ any ” type makes it possible to continue more type- checking In practice, use “ int ” or guess one Similarly, a “ void ” type can be used for expressions that return no value Source locations are annotated in AST!

42 Summary Elaboration checks the context-sensitive properties of programs must take care of semantics of source programs and may translate into more low-level forms Usually the most big (complex) part in a compiler!


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