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123 Go To Section: We The People, Lesson 1 Read “Purpose of the Lesson” (p. 2) Make note of the “Terms to Know”. You will be expected to know these terms.

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Presentation on theme: "123 Go To Section: We The People, Lesson 1 Read “Purpose of the Lesson” (p. 2) Make note of the “Terms to Know”. You will be expected to know these terms."— Presentation transcript:

1 123 Go To Section: We The People, Lesson 1 Read “Purpose of the Lesson” (p. 2) Make note of the “Terms to Know”. You will be expected to know these terms.

2 123 Go To Section: What Would Life Be Like In a State of Nature? Read pp. 2-4 Respond (in writing) to the “What do you think” questions (2-4) on p.5 Withdrawing Consent? Withdrawing Consent

3 123 Go To Section: Nullification: How states are making it a felony to enforce federal gun laws By Lois Beckett In mid-April, Kansas passed a law asserting that federal gun regulations do not apply to guns made and owned in Kansas. Under the law, Kansans could manufacture and sell semi-automatic weapons in-state without a federal license or any federal oversight.do not apply Kansas’ Second Amendment Protection Act backs up its states’ rights claims with a penalty aimed at federal agents: When dealing with “Made in Kansas” guns, any attempt to enforce federal law is now a felony. Bills similar to Kansas’ law have been introduced in at least 37 other states. An even broader bill is on the desk of Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell. That bill would exempt any gun owned by an Alaskan from federal regulation. In Missouri, a bill declaring federal gun laws null and void passed by an overwhelming majority in the Statehouse, and is headed for debate in the Senate.Second Amendment Protection Act null and void Mobilizing the pre-Civil War doctrine of nullification, these bills assert that Congress has overstepped its ability to regulate guns – and that states, not the Supreme Court, have the ultimate authority to decide whether a law is constitutional.nullification Read more here:

4 123 Go To Section: What Would Life Be Like In a State of Nature? Read pp. 5, 6 Respond (in writing) to the “What do you think” questions (1-4) on p.6 Iron Fist“Yahoo answers” Iron Fist “Would Iraq be stable with an iron-fist leader like Saddam Hussein?” Answer: “A stable nation, any stable nation, does not require an iron-fist to rule. That being said, all those countries in that area -- Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan and all the other "Stans" -- will never be democratized simply because there are too many tribal, ethnic, and religious differences. An iron-fist is needed to maintain order and, unfortunately, some people have to be "dealt with accordingly" to suppress dissent against the regime that keeps that order. “ Do you agree/disagree??

5 123 Go To Section: We The People, Lesson 2 Read “Purpose of the Lesson” (p. 7) Make note of the “Terms to Know”. You will be expected to know these terms.

6 123 Go To Section: How Does Government Secure Natural Rights? Read pp. 7-9 Respond (in writing) to the “What do you think?” questions (1-3) on p. 9.

7 123 Go To Section: How Does Government Secure Natural Rights? Critical Thinking Disc. p.10 Read pp Respond (in writing) to the “What do you think?” questions (1-3) on p. 12.

8 123 Go To Section: How Does Government Secure Natural Rights? Small group 1.Read discuss 1-5, “Reviewing and Using the Lesson, on page Make note of any questions you have or of any of the content that is still unclear.

9 123 Go To Section: Lesson 3: Republican Government What’s the difference??? Republic vs. Democracy Read pp Respond: 1.Describe the concepts of civic virtue and moral education in your own words. 2.Explain why small, uniform communities were seen as an essential condition for a republic.

10 123 Go To Section: Critical Thinking: Compare and Contrast (pp ) Natural Rights Philosophy Stressed the right of the individual to life, liberty and property Stressed that human nature is such that individual behavior is motivated by self- interest. Stressed that society is a collection of individuals, each sharing the same right to pursue his or her own welfare. Stressed that peoples opportunities should not be limited by the situation or group into which they are born. Stressed that the main purpose of government should be to protect natural rights. The State existed to serve the interests of the individual. To preserve natural rights, governments guarantee specific rights, such as civil rights (freedom of conscience and privacy) and political rights (vote, run for office.) Classical Republicanism Stressed promotion of the common good above the rights of the individual. Stressed that individuals should be motivated by civic virtue Limited individual rights to privacy, belief, expression, and opportunities to read, think and earn money. People must be dedicated to the common good…not self-interest Discouraged diversity of beliefs, wealth and ways of life. People were expected to know their place in the community. The State exists to promote the common good…not individual interests. Stressed avoiding the formation of factions or interest groups that might endanger the common good. Stressed the importance of political rights such as voting and serving in public office.

11 123 Go To Section: What government is best? Read on p. 16, “How did the founders think a government should be organized to promote the common good? * What did Montesquieu mean by divided and balanced? Why did he believe this was the best solution? * What is mixed government? * Did Montesquieu contribute anything to our system???

12 123 Go To Section: Madison and Republicanism “If all people were angels there would be no need for government…”Expand the sphere…” James Madison, Federalist Democracy only works in small settings 2. A republic uses representatives…allows extension of the people’s will over a large area 3. Representative Democracy??? 1.Advantages? 2.Disadvantages? 3.What becomes of “civic virtue” (17)

13 123 Go To Section: Final Reading…pp16-18 Respond to “What do you think”, #1-3, p.18 Small group 1.Read and discuss 1-7, “Reviewing and Using the Lesson, on page Make note of any questions you have or of any of the content that is still unclear.

14 123 Go To Section: Problems with a Republic? Small homogenous communities?? The diversity of America…Wealth, Religion, Culture Reconciling capitalism with republicanism…stratification of society

15 123 Go To Section: Madison’s Representative Democracy Direct democracy only works at the small scale (i.e., local level). A republic would allow government to be extended over a larger area. Representatives would come from the “whole people”…i.e., the diverse community of people throughout the country. In that way, the right to govern comes from the people (popular sovereignty, social contract.) Civic virtue will arise through the pursuit of self-interest. Government must be structured in a way that guards against the corruption of power. Separation of powerschecks and balances

16 Presentation Pro © 2001 by Prentice Hall, Inc. Magruder’s American Government C H A P T E R 1 Principles of Government

17 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section 1 Government and the State S E C T I O N 1 Government and the State How is government defined? What are the basic powers that every government holds? What are the four defining characteristics of the state? How have we attempted to explain the origin of the state? What is the purpose of government in the United States and other countries?

18 123 Go To Section: What Is Government? What Should it look like? Chapter 1 Section Government is the institution through which a society makes and enforces its public policies.

19 123 Go To Section: Straight to the Source (12 or 760) Straight to the Source (12 or 760) Explain how the language of the preamble reflects the idea of the Social Contract

20 123 Go To Section: The Purpose of Government What Should It Be? The main purposes of government are described in the Preamble of the Constitution of the United States: “ We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” Chapter 1, Section

21 123 Go To Section: Origins of the State: Central Question – How do governments form? The Force Theory The force theory states that one person or a small group took control of an area and forced all within it to submit to that person’s or group’s rule. The Evolutionary Theory The evolutionary theory argues that the state evolved naturally out of the early family. The Divine Right Theory The theory of divine right holds that God created the state and that God gives those of royal birth a “divine right” to rule. The Social Contract Theory The social contract theory argues that the state arose out of a voluntary act of free people. Chapter 1, Section

22 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section The State: What is a State? The state can be defined as having these four characteristics:

23 123 Go To Section: What Is Government? Chapter 1 Section Challenges??

24 Presentation Pro Quiz Time!!

25 123 Go To Section: Forms of Government S E C T I O N 2 Forms of Government How can we classify governments? How are systems of government defined in terms of who can participate? How is power distributed within a state? How are governments defined by the relationship between the legislative and executive branches? Chapter 1, Section

26 123 Go To Section: Forms of Government Small Group: Brainstorm Forms of Government and their characteristics Note: 3 types of government power???

27 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section Classifying Governments: Compare and Contrast Governments can be classified by three different standards: (1) Who can participate in the governing process. (2) The geographic distribution of the governmental power within the state. (3) The relationship between the legislative (lawmaking) and the executive (law-executing) branches of the government.

28 123 Go To Section: Classification by Who Can Participate Chapter 1, Section Democracy In a democracy, supreme political authority rests with the people. A direct democracy exists where the will of the people is translated into law directly by the people themselves. In an indirect democracy, a small group of persons, chosen by the people to act as their representatives, expresses the popular will. Dictatorship A dictatorship exists where those who rule cannot be held responsible to the will of the people. An autocracy is a government in which a single person holds unlimited political power. An oligarchy is a government in which the power to rule is held by a small, usually self-appointed elite.

29 123 Go To Section: Classification by Geographic Distribution of Power Unitary Government A unitary government has all powers held by a single, central agency. Chapter 1, Section Confederate Government A confederation is an alliance of independent states. Federal Government A federal government is one in which the powers of government are divided between a central government and several local governments. An authority superior to both the central and local governments makes this division of power on a geographic basis.

30 123 Go To Section: Classification by the Relationship Between Legislative and Executive Branches Chapter 1, Section

31 123 Go To Section: Forms of Government Chapter 1, Section

32 Presentation Pro Another Quiz?? (This guy is out of his mind…)

33 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section 3 Basic Concepts of Democracy S E C T I O N 3 Basic Concepts of Democracy What are the foundations of American democracy? What are the connections between democracy and the free enterprise system? How has/will the Internet affected democracy?

34 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section Foundations: Central Question – What are the foundations of American Democracy? The American concept of democracy rests on these basic notions: “Give me 5” (1) A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of every person; (2) A respect for the equality of all persons; (3) A faith in majority rule and an insistence upon minority rights; (4) An acceptance of the necessity of compromise; and (5) An insistence upon the widest possible degree of individual freedom.

35 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section Democracy and the Free Enterprise System A reflection of Locke?? The free enterprise system is an economic system characterized by private or corporate ownership of capital goods; investments that are determined by private decision rather than by state control; and determined in a free market. Decisions in a free enterprise system are determined by the law of supply and demand. In other words, individuals free to pursue self-interest… An economy in which private enterprise exists in combination with a considerable amount of government regulation and promotion is called a mixed economy. In other words…Civic Virtue?...

36 123 Go To Section: Chapter 1, Section Democracy and the Free Enterprise System Is American Free Enterprise Capitalism consistent with the foundations of American Democracy? Yes/no/example? (1) A recognition of the fundamental worth and dignity of every person; (2) A respect for the equality of all persons; (3) A faith in majority rule and an insistence upon minority rights; (4) An acceptance of the necessity of compromise; and (5) An insistence upon the widest possible degree of individual freedom.

37 123 Go To Section: Democracy and the Internet: Central Question – Is our Democracy aided by I.T. Chapter 1, Section Democracy demands that the people be widely informed about their government. Theoretically, the Internet makes knowledgeable participation in democratic process easier than ever before….Does it?


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