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What you should know about Anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis Is a severe allergic reaction Involves more than one bodily system, for example the skin and respiratory.

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Presentation on theme: "What you should know about Anaphylaxis. Anaphylaxis Is a severe allergic reaction Involves more than one bodily system, for example the skin and respiratory."— Presentation transcript:

1 What you should know about Anaphylaxis

2 Anaphylaxis Is a severe allergic reaction Involves more than one bodily system, for example the skin and respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract Can be life-threatening Epinephrine, or adrenaline, is the medication of choice for handling an anaphylactic reaction

3 Anaphylaxis Is caused by: Food Insect stings Medications Latex

4 Food-Allergy Induced Anaphylaxis Accounts for 30,000 emergency room visits each year Causes between 150 to 200 deaths each year; many are children More people die of food allergy reactions than insect sting and medication allergy

5 Symptoms of a Severe Allergic Reaction Can Include Respiratory tract: –Itchy, watery eyes, running or stuffy nose, sneezing, cough, tingling of the mouth, itching or swelling of the mouth or throat, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath, wheezing, asthma, GI tract: –abdominal cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea Skin: –hives, eczema, itchy red rash, swelling

6 Symptoms of a Severe Allergic Reaction Can Include (2) Cardiovascular –Drop in blood pressure, loss of consciousness/fainting, shock, death

7 Anaphylaxis Patients with peanut or tree nut allergy and asthma appear to be at increased risk for anaphylaxis Epinephrine (adrenaline), the medicine of choice for treating an anaphylactic reaction is available by prescription as an auto- injector –EpiPen® or EpiPen Jr.®

8 Anaphylaxis Management Accidents are never planned Quick treatment can be life-saving Create a plan for managing a reaction before you need it Up to 20% of students who will have an anaphylactic reaction have their first one in school Educate others on what to do in case you need their help

9 3 Rs of An Allergic Emergency Plan R ecognize symptoms early R eact quickly R eview what caused the reaction

10 Anaphylaxis Management An emergency plan of action should include: What symptoms to look for What medications to use Medication dosage instructions Where will medications be kept What others should do Allergy emergency practice drills

11 Key Steps in Anaphylaxis Management Recognize students Know what symptoms to look for Administer epinephrine quickly Transport to hospital after EpiPen® use, then call parents

12 How to Use EpiPen® How to Hold Form a fist around the center of the unit Pull off gray activation cap How to Use Hold black tip near outer thigh (always apply to thigh) Count to 10 Swing and jab into outer thigh. Hold in place and count to 10

13 What you should know about Insect Stings Symptoms usually occur within minutes Reactions can vary from mild to life- threatening Local reactions do not predict a severe reaction

14 What you should know about insect stings (2) Local reactions are found at site of sting and can cause painful swelling and itching Symptoms usually disappear within a few hours Some local reactions can cause swelling in a large area, i.e. the entire arm from a sting to the hand

15 Managing Students with Insect Stings Identify the allergic student Minimize exposure to stinging insects –Avoid wearing flowers outdoors –Wear long-sleeve shirts, long pants, and shoes when walking on grassy areas –Keep hands and face clean of sweet liquid –Avoid large bushes, especially flowering ones –Keep garbage covered –Avoid drinking sweetened liquids outdoors; if unavoidable, keep drinks covered

16 Treatment of Insect Stings To relieve mild symptoms –Place a cold compress on the sting site –Antihistamines may relieve itching –Baking soda and water paste may reduce reactions –Applying a topical steroid cream may be helpful in slowly reducing the reaction size Administer EpiPen ©, if authorized Seek immediate medical attention for students with a history of severe reactions or at first sign of symptoms of a severe reaction

17 What you should know about Latex Allergy Latex allergy is an emerging health issue Affects 5 to 10% of healthcare workers Affects 1 to 6% of general population High risk groups –Rubber industry workers –Health care workers –Children with spina bifida and others with multiple surgeries

18 Latex and Food Allergy Connection Protein in some foods cross react with latex proteins: Bananas Chestnut Passion fruit Avocado Kiwi Celery Melon

19 Latex Allergy Symptoms Skin Hives Rash Respiratory Itchy, red, watery eyes Sneezing Runny nose Coughing

20 Latex Allergy Symptoms (2) Symptoms can be severe and include: Difficult breathing Shortness of breath Shock Loss of consciousness Death There is no cure for latex allergy Avoidance of latex products is critical

21 Latex-containing Products that Commonly Cause Reactions Gloves Balloons Condoms

22 Latex-containing Products* that Rarely Cause Reactions Rubber bands Erasers Rubber parts for toys Products made from crepe rubber (soles of shoes) Latex clothing Elastic on clothing Feeding nipples and pacifiers * Latex paint does not contain latex

23 Additional Resources Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network -- Allergy & Asthma Network/Mothers of Asthmatics, Inc. -- American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology -- American Academy of Pediatrics --

24 Additional Resources American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology -- Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America -- Food Allergy Initiative -- International Food Information Council Foundation --


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