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Counseling the Overweight Child A Training for CHDP Providers Developed by:  CHDP Statewide Nutrition Subcommittee December 2008.

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Presentation on theme: "Counseling the Overweight Child A Training for CHDP Providers Developed by:  CHDP Statewide Nutrition Subcommittee December 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 Counseling the Overweight Child A Training for CHDP Providers Developed by:  CHDP Statewide Nutrition Subcommittee December 2008

2 Goals  Remind providers to disclose BMI %ile for all children over the age of 2 years  Reinforce the physician’s role in initiating childhood obesity prevention and treatment  Demonstrate counseling skills using Brief Focused Advice to deliver key messages

3 Overweight & Obese Children California children ages 2 to <5 years 2007 CDC Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System growth statistics from CHDP PM160 report

4 Overweight & Obese Children California children ages 5 to <20 years 2007 CDC Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System growth statistics from CHDP PM160 report

5 Food Supply Urban Design & Transportation Systems Media Legislation Framework for Childhood Obesity Prevention Environmental Change Schools Community Based Healthcare System The Child Home & Family Individual Change: Knowledge, Skills, Motivation Developed by: Gail Woodward-Lopez U. C. Berkeley Center for Weight and Health

6 Physician Advice Does Make a Difference

7 Behavioral Changes Among Patients Who Did and Did Not Receive Physician Advice to Change Kreuter et al. Arch Fam Med, 2000

8 Role of the Practitioner 2007 AMA Recommendations  Screen weight status using BMI percentile  Routinely deliver obesity prevention messages (regardless of weight) during well-child exams  Order the appropriate lab tests  Follow-up and/or refer

9 Motivational Interviewing (MI)  MI was developed for addiction counseling  It is a directive, client-centered counseling style for eliciting behavior change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence  MI is now successful with chronic illness patients Miller & Rollnick 1991

10 Brief Focused Advice Step #1: Engage the Patient/Parent   How do you feel about your child’s weight? Step #2: Share Information   Your child’s current weight puts him/her at risk for diabetes, heart disease, asthma… Step #3: Make a Key Advice Statement I would strongly encourage you to …   Get up and play hard at least one hour a day   Cut back on screen time to < 2 hours a day   Eat at least 5 helpings of fruits & vegetables every day   Cut back on soda, sports drinks, juice and sweetened drinks Step #4: Arrange for Follow-up   Let’s set up a future appointment to talk about how things are going. Effective Communications with Families, Kaiser Permanente © 2004

11 Avoid: Avoid: Obese, heavy, overweight, fat Obese, heavy, overweight, fat Ideal weight Ideal weight Fix the child Fix the child Focus on weight Focus on weight Diets or “ bad foods ” Diets or “ bad foods ” Exercise Exercise Replace with: Unhealthy weight Unhealthy weight Healthy weight Healthy weight Family behavior change Family behavior change Focus on lifestyle Focus on lifestyle Healthier food choices Healthier food choices Activity or play Activity or play Overweight Sensitivity Effective Communications with Families, Kaiser Permanente, © 2004

12 AMA Recommended Behaviors for Obesity Prevention and Treatment  Breastfeed  Increase physical activity  Limit TV and screen time  Eat more fruits & vegetables  Eat breakfast daily  Eat out less often, particularly fast food  Limit portion sizes  Limit sugar-sweetened beverages

13 Does Breastfeeding Reduce the Risk of Pediatric Overweight?*  Breastfeeding is associated with a reduced odds of pediatric overweight  It also appears to have an inverse dose- response association with overweight *CDC Research to Practice Series, No. 4, July 2007

14 Babies Who are Exclusively Breastfed are Less Likely to Become Obese Von Kries R. et al. (1999). Breast Feeding and Obesity: Cross Sectional Study. Brit Med J 319:

15 Little Changes. Big Rewards.

16 Get Moving: Aim for at Least 60 Minutes of Physical Activity a Day Tips:   Schedule outdoor time: plan family walks, outings to the park, or bike rides   Be active indoors: dance, vacuum, make beds, play balloon volleyball   Sign up for activities through the YMCA, Parks and Rec Dept, schools and community centers (reference – resource guide)

17 Pull the Plug: Limit Screen Time to < 2 hrs/day Tips:   Remove TV and computers from children’s bedrooms   No TV for children under 2 years   Turn off TV during mealtimes

18 Eat Smart: Eat More Fruits & Vegetables Tips:   Offer fruits for snacks instead of chips, cookies, and candy   Choose frozen or canned vegetables if fresh are not available   Cut up fruits and vegetables so that they are ready to eat

19 Eat Smart: Eat Breakfast Daily Tips:   Stock kitchen with easy to grab breakfast items (fruits, mini bagels, cheese sticks, yogurt)   Check if the school has a breakfast program   Eat breakfast with your child

20 Eat Smart: Eat Less Fast Food Tips:   Order the smallest size food/beverage   Prepare homemade meals in advance to avoid the temptation of fast food   Avoid “extras” like cheese, bacon, and mayo

21 Eat Smart: Limit Portion Size Tips:   Serve food on smaller plates   (Note that a child’s stomach is the size of his/her fist)   Keep serving dishes off the table   Split an entrée or take half home when eating out

22 Impact of Increasing Portion Sizes in Children Doubling an age - appropriate portion of entrée   25% entrée &  15% total energy intakes Children consumed 25% less of an entrée when allowed to serve themselves vs. being served a large portion (Stomach  size of child’s fist) Fisher et al, AJCN, 2003 **P<.01

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24 Drink Well: Limit Sweetened Beverages Tips:   Decide what drinks are available in your home   Offer water or non/low-fat milk instead of juice or soda   Mix 100% fruit juice with water and limit to:   4-6 oz. for 1-6 years   8-12 oz for 7-18 years

25 My Healthy Lifestyle Goal Tracker

26 Resources For additional online training on Brief Negotiation, go to: For the AMA 2007 Expert Committee Recommendations, go to: For current Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance System (PedNSS) data go to:

27 Brief Focused Advice: Role Playing Exercise

28 Brief Focused Advice Step #1: Engage the Patient/Parent   How do you feel about your child’s weight? Step #2: Share Information   Your child’s current weight puts him/her at risk for diabetes, heart disease, asthma… Step #3: Make a Key Advice Statement I would strongly encourage you to …   Get up and play hard at least one hour a day   Cut back on screen time to < 2 hours a day   Eat at least 5 helpings of fruits & vegetables every day   Cut back on soda, sports drinks, juice and sweetened drinks Step #4: Arrange for Follow-up   Let’s set up a future appointment to talk about how things are going. Effective Communications with Families, Kaiser Permanente © 2004

29 Summary  The physician plays an important role in initiating childhood obesity prevention treatment  Brief focused advice is easy to incorporate into a well child visit  ‘Little Changes. Big Rewards.’ is an effective tool from a national campaign to deliver key evidence-based health promotion messages


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