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Basic English Review—English the Easy Way © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING UNIT 1 The Sentence 1.To understand that a sentence expresses a complete thought.

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Presentation on theme: "Basic English Review—English the Easy Way © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING UNIT 1 The Sentence 1.To understand that a sentence expresses a complete thought."— Presentation transcript:

1 Basic English Review—English the Easy Way © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING UNIT 1 The Sentence 1.To understand that a sentence expresses a complete thought. 2.To recognize the different kinds of sentences. 3.To identify the eight parts of speech. 4.To write sentences effectively. objectives UNIT1

2 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 2 Section 1 A Sentence A sentence expresses a complete thought through a series or group of words. A simple sentence consists of two important parts, the subject (a noun or pronoun) and the verb. The subject noun is a person, place, or thing spoken of, and the verb is the word that tells what the subject does or is. A group of words is not a sentence unless it contains both a subject and a verb.

3 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 3 Section 1 The Sentence Alexa went to the trade show. Analysis Alexa—person spoken of—subject went—tells what Alexa did—verb

4 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 4 Section 1 The Sentence Anthony in his car at the toll booth. Analysis Anthony—person spoken of—subject There is no verb to tell what Anthony did—the sentence is incomplete. A verb such as drove, sat, or waited is needed to complete the sentence. Correct Anthony waited in his car at the toll booth. example

5 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 5 Section 1 The Sentence—Compound Subjects Take Plural Verbs Grace and Tom walk two miles every day. Analysis Grace, Tom—persons spoken of—subject walk—tells what Grace and Tom do—verb

6 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 6 Section 2 Kinds of Sentences Declarative Interrogative Exclamatory Imperative

7 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 7 Section 2 Declarative Sentence The declarative sentence makes a statement. It ends with a period. Examples: The band played many new songs. Jennifer Lopez sings with a band.

8 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 8 Section 2 Interrogative Sentence The interrogative sentence asks a question. It ends with a question mark. Examples: Are you looking for a job? How long have you been in school?

9 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 9 Section 2 Exclamatory Sentence The exclamatory sentence expresses surprise, disbelief, or deep feeling. It ends with an exclamation point. Examples That was a great movie! Watch out for that runaway truck!

10 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 10 Section 2 Imperative Sentence The imperative sentence gives a command, requests someone to do something, or begs. It usually ends with a period, but a strong command may end with an exclamation point. The subject you is often omitted, but understood.

11 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 11 Section 2 Imperative Sentence Listen to the teacher. (you understood) Keep your hand down. (you understood) Look at these new Web sites. Don't touch that delete button! (imperative and exclamatory) example

12 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 12 Section 3 Parts of Speech Most of the words that are used to make sentences can be sorted into eight classifications called parts of speech. Some words can be more than one part of speech depending on their position or use in a sentence.

13 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 13 Section 3-A Nouns - A noun names a person, a place, a thing, a concept, or an activity. Michael Jordan played basketball in Chicago. Analysis Michael Jordan—names a person—noun basketball—names a thing—noun Chicago—names a place—noun

14 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 14 Section 3-A Nouns Hope springs eternal. Analysis Hope—names a concept—noun example

15 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 15 Section 3-A Nouns Cross-training keeps Sonya and Chris fit. Analysis Cross-training—names an activity—noun Sonya and Chris—name people—nouns example

16 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 16 Section 3-B Pronouns – A pronoun is a word used as a substitute for a noun. He ran to catch the bus. Analysis He—used in place of the name of the individual—pronoun

17 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 17 Section 3-B Pronouns They visited the Hawaiian Islands. Analysis They—used in place of the names of the individuals—pronoun example

18 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 18 Section 3-B Pronouns The school admitted them. Analysis them—used in place of the names of the individuals—pronoun example

19 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 19 Section 3-C Verbs - A verb tells what the subject does or is or what happens to it. It can make a statement, ask a question, or give a command. Nichole Walter wrote an interesting term paper. Analysis wrote—tells what the subject, Nichole Walter, did—verb

20 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 20 Section 3-C Verbs Is Maui one of the Hawaiian Islands? Analysis Is—asks a question about the subject, Maui—verb example

21 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 21 Section 3-C Verbs Handle that vase carefully! Analysis Handle—gives a command to the understood subject, you (You handle that vase carefully!)—verb example

22 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 22 Section 3-D Adjectives An adjective modifies (describes) a noun or a pronoun. It answers such questions as these: How many? How big? What kind? Which? A, an, and the are adjectives. Definite (the) and indefinite (a, an) adjectives are referred to as articles.

23 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 23 Section 3-D Adjectives The three sisters started a new business. Analysis The—definite adjective three—tells how many sisters—adjective a—indefinite adjective new—tells what kind of business—adjective example

24 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 24 Section 3-D Adjectives The veteran coach wears blue hats. Analysis The—definite adjective veteran—tells what kind of coach— adjective blue—tells what kind of hats—adjective example

25 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 25 Section 3-E Adverbs An adverb modifies (describes) a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. It answers such questions as these: When? Where? How? Most words ending in ly are adverbs. Five common exceptions are friendly, lively, lonely, lovely, and ugly, which are adjectives.

26 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 26 Section 3-E Adverbs Sandy walked quickly in the hot sand. Analysis quickly—modifies the verb, walked, by telling how—adverb example

27 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 27 Section 3-E Adverbs The moving van traveled south from San Francisco. Analysis south—modifies the verb, traveled, by telling where or in what direction—adverb example

28 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 28 Section 3-E Adverbs Anne seldom missed a basketball game. Analysis seldom—modifies the verb, missed, by telling when—adverb example

29 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 29 Section 3-F Prepositions A preposition shows the relationship of a noun or pronoun to some other word in the sentence.

30 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 30 Section 3-F Prepositions The police chased the thief around the house and into the bushes. Analysis around—shows relationship between house and chased into—shows relationship between bushes and chased—preposition example

31 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 31 Section 3-F Prepositions The election established the winner by a majority of the votes. Analysis by—shows relationship between majority and winner—preposition of—shows relationship between votes and majority—preposition example

32 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 32 Section 3-G Conjunctions A conjunction joins words, phrases (groups of related words that lack a subject or a verb), and clauses (groups of words containing a subject and a verb).

33 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 33 Section 3-G Conjunctions Mysteries and comedies are my favorite television shows. Analysis and—joins the words Mysteries and comedies—conjunction example

34 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 34 Section 3-G Conjunctions Was your aunt the senator or governor of your state? Analysis or—joins the words senator and governor— conjunction example

35 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 35 Section 3-G Conjunctions The parents of the players and the students left the dressing room. Analysis and—joins the phrases The parents of the players and the students—conjunction example

36 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 36 Section 3-G Conjunctions When I entered the garage, I noticed the flat tire. Analysis When—introduces and joins the clause When I entered the garage with the clause I noticed the flat tire—conjunction example

37 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 37 Section 3-H Interjections An interjection is a word or words used to express strong and sudden feeling— surprise, fear, suspense, anger, love, joy, and other emotions. Words such as wow, ouch, hurrah, oh, and hooray are interjections. Words such as help, beware, and stop (usually verbs) may be used as interjections.

38 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 38 Section 3-H Interjections Ouch! That match burned my hand. Analysis Ouch!—expresses sudden feeling— interjection example

39 © SOUTH-WESTERN PUBLISHING Basic English Review—English the Easy Way UNIT 1 39 Section 3-H Interjections Wow! I finally found the perfect job. Analysis Wow!—expresses sudden feeling— interjection example


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