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 Form groups of 4.  Read each standard in the envelope.  Discuss the standard with the members in your group.  Categorize the grade level standard.

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Presentation on theme: " Form groups of 4.  Read each standard in the envelope.  Discuss the standard with the members in your group.  Categorize the grade level standard."— Presentation transcript:

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4  Form groups of 4.  Read each standard in the envelope.  Discuss the standard with the members in your group.  Categorize the grade level standard under each anchor standard.

5 1. Write key components of your standard on your large sheet. 2. Post the sheet on the wall. 3. Go around the room and add statements on each standard by completing one of these sentence frames: › One challenge for ELs that I have encountered within the __________ standard is _________________. › One challenge for Els that I anticipate within the __________ standard is _________________. › One benefit for ELs I have encountered within the __________ standard is _________________. › One benefit for Els I anticipate within the ___________ standard is _________________.

6  Define what students should know and be able to do for college and career readiness  Address K-12 in English/language arts and mathematics  Have been adopted by 45+ states  Were developed by states with leadership from Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and National Governor’s Association (NGA)

7  Standards are research-based Foster the independent reading of complex texts that are crucial for college and career readiness, Emphasize importance of informational texts.  Standards are aligned with the expectations of employers and colleges  Address concern that adult reading levels are disturbingly low  Include rigorous content and application of knowledge through higher-order skills  Are internationally-benchmarked

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9 K  English Language Arts/Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects  Math  Speaking and Listening, Reading, Writing, Language and Standard 10 Rang, Quality and Complexity  English Language Arts  Math  Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects  Speaking and Listening, Reading, Writing, Language and Standard 10 Rang, Quality and Complexity

10 Student performance expectations within the Common Core are very high. Educators of ELLs will be challenged to identify materials and methods that support ELLs in meeting the standards. Districts will be challenged to develop methods of validly and reliably assessing the progress and performance of ELLs toward meeting the standards. Districts must build the capacity of teachers to support ELLs toward meeting the standards.

11  Predictable, clear, and consistent instruction  Extended explanations  Opportunities to practice and expand language  Visual cues  Opportunities to build and connect background knowledge  Targeted vocabulary instruction  Explicit language instruction

12  Read the statements.  Select if you agree or disagree.  Justify your response.  Divide into jigsaw groups.  Read the article.  Share out within your jigsaw group.

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14  Confirm your original response.  Justify your response by citing the appropriate paragraph.

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17  Read the statements.  Indicate whether this applies to you or your classroom : often, sometimes, seldom, or never.  Give yourself the following points per item: › Often = 3 › Sometimes = 2 › Seldom = 1 › Never = 0

18 1) Offer enough high-quality English language input 2) Offer more opportunities for students to meaningfully use the target language.

19 Silent Response: Place your fingers on your chest to rate the accuracy of this statistic for classrooms in your school. Show 1 finger (highly accurate), 2 fingers(somewhat accurate), 3 fingers (not accurate)

20  Students know the information is important.  Students listen more attentively.  Students work harder to process the information.  Students have added opportunity for interest and challenge.

21  They have increased opportunities to become familiar with the new material.  They have more chances to experiment with and personalize the language.  They develop better communication skills.  They must work together to repair the miscomprehension.

22 Student Talk Time  Should be 20% of the lesson.  The teacher must speak more when providing explanations and examples early in the lesson.  Elsewhere he may speak less as students need ample opportunity to practice the new material.  Should be 80% of the lesson.  Student language use should promote qualitative thought.  Students need some drills to become familiar with and absorb the target language.  Too many drills result in students who fail to critically observe, analyze, and practice with the new language.

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25 Fillmore argued the amount of teacher talk time should not be decreased blindly. These two conditions must be met for successful SLA to occur with reduced teacher talk: 1. The students must have a high enough level of language proficiency to communicate with their teacher and among themselves. 2. There must be enough students who want to communicate in class.

26 Swain’s (1985) Output Hypothesis argues that comprehensible input is not a sufficient condition for SLA. It is only when input becomes intake that SLA takes place. The need to produce output encourages the learner to develop the necessary grammatical resources, which are referred to as “pushed language use”.

27 Output provides the learner with the opportunity to try out hypotheses to see if they work. Production helps to force the learner to move from semantic to syntactic processing. It is possible to comprehend a message without any syntactic analysis of the input it contains. Production is the trigger that forces learners to pay attention to the means of expression.

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42 Quizlet

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44 Put words in order of size. Use in oral sentences. Describe Plankton Small“My feet are small.” Little“My sister is little.” Tiny“A baby is tiny.” Itty Bitty“A snail is itty bitty.” Microscopic “Plankton are microscopic.” “Plankton no can swim.” “Plankton can float.” “The fish eat the plankton.”

45 Horses can gallop. Horses can canter. Horses can trot. Horses can walk.

46  Look at the picture  DO NOT SHOW YOUR PARTNER YOUR PICTURE!!!!!!!!!!!!! NO PEEKING!!!!!!!!!!  Partner A: Use the words in the box to describe picture A to your partner.  Partner B: Draw the picture that your partner is describing to you.  SWITCH!!!!

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49  Windows Movie Maker  Photo Story 3  PowerPoint  iMovie

50 Write a short story describing the interaction between two people who are negotiating the sale of a horse. Include:  at least 6 vocabulary words that describe characteristics of the horse  drawings or photos  dialogue

51  Create storyboard by drawing pictures and writing story.  Choose program.  Take pictures, videos, or scan drawings.  Record voice on computer.  Add titles.  Publish!

52  Windows Movie Maker  Photo Story 3  PowerPoint PowerPoint  iMovie iMovie

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54 Academic English is extended, reasoned discourse. It is not short responses or just one sentence after another. It is logical, connected discourse that is much more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language. Wong-Fillmore, 2004

55 Academic English uses grammatical devices that allow speakers and writers to pack as much information as necessary for interpretation into coherent and logical sequences. Wong-Fillmore, 2004

56 In an effort to create “ELL-friendly” materials, textbook publishers have created materials that are devoid of academic language. These texts are being used with ELLs, who are then completely unprepared to transition to authentic academic readings.

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58 What do you know about plants? Most plants are green. They need light and water to grow. Some plants have beautiful flowers. Many plants are good to eat. Plants are living things. They are part of a large group of living things called the plant kingdom. Plants are the same as animals in some ways. They need food and water. They reproduce, or make new plants. They grow and, in time, die.

59  Does it have extended, reasoned discourse?  Is it not just one short sentence after another?  Is it more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language?  Does it employ grammatical devices that allow for large amounts of information to be coherently included in one sentence?

60 What do you know about plants? Most plants are green. They need light and water to grow. Some plants have beautiful flowers. Many plants are good to eat. Plants are living things. They are part of a large group of living things called the plant kingdom. Plants are the same as animals in some ways. They need food and water. They reproduce, or make new plants. They grow and, in time, die.

61 S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S- v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v- o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o. S-v-o.

62 How can we engage students and support them in mastering academic language with texts that are devoid of grammatical complexity?

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64 The astrolabe (in Greek, “star reckoner”) is a manual computing and observation device with myriad uses in astronomy, time keeping, surveying, navigation, and astrology. The principles behind the most common variety, the planispheric astrolabe, were first laid down in antiquity by the Greeks, who pioneered the notion of projecting three dimensional images on flat surfaces. The device reached a high degree of refinement in the medieval Islamic world, where it was invaluable for determining prayer times and the direction of Mecca from anywhere in the Muslim world. Nicastro, Nicholas. Circumference: Eratosthenes and the Ancient Quest to Measure the Globe. New York: St. Martin’s Press, (2008)

65  Does it have extended, reasoned discourse?  Is it not just one short sentence after another?  Is it more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language?  Does it employ grammatical devices that allow for large amounts of information to be coherently included in one sentence?

66 The astrolabe (in Greek, “star reckoner”) is a manual computing and observation device with myriad uses in astronomy, time keeping, surveying, navigation, and astrology. The principles behind the most common variety, the planispheric astrolabe, were first laid down in antiquity by the Greeks, who pioneered the notion of projecting three dimensional images on flat surfaces. The device reached a high degree of refinement in the medieval Islamic world, where it was invaluable for determining prayer times and the direction of Mecca from anywhere in the Muslim world. Nicastro, Nicholas. Circumference: Eratosthenes and the Ancient Quest to Measure the Globe. New York: St. Martin’s Press, (2008)

67  The astrolabe (in Greek, “star reckoner”) is a manual computing and observation device with myriad uses in astronomy, time keeping, surveying, navigation, and astrology.  Parenthetical devices  Greek roots  Modifiers  Serial commas

68  Read the text  Use the criteria to evaluate the level of complexity.

69 CriteriaEvidence Does it have extended, reasoned discourse? Is it not just one short sentence after another? Is it more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language? Does it employ grammatical devices that allow for large amounts of information to be coherently included in one sentence?

70 Criteria  Does it have extended, reasoned discourse?  Is it not just one short sentence after another?  Is it more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language?  Does it employ grammatical devices that allow for large amounts of information to be coherently included in one sentence? Evidence  Yes, particularly in the first paragraph.  No. When a horse walks, each hoof leaves the ground at a different time. It moves…  Yes. Palominos, pintos, the body swings gently …  Noun Phrases – Most horses that look white are actually gray. Informational Density –When a horse trots, its legs moves in pairs, left front leg with right hind leg, and right front leg with left hind leg.

71 Criteria  Does it have extended, reasoned discourse?  Is it not just one short sentence after another?  Is it more precise in reference than ordinary spoken language?  Does it employ grammatical devices that allow for large amounts of information to be coherently included in one sentence? Evidence  Yes, explanation for Ginger’s biting habit  No. Short sentences only appear in the dialogue.  Yes. Fond farewell, box lined with clean, fresh hay, sweet oats, patted me and left me to settle in.  Noun Phrases – So the poor horse that was killed in the hunt when I was young was my brother. Informational Density –We started slowly, then we started trotting and cantering and when we were on the common by Highwood, he gave me the lightest touch of the whip and we had a splendid gallop. Adverbial Clause- After I had eaten, I looked around my stall and into the one beyond. Frequent tense changes within the narrative.

72  Simple to Complex  Sentence Chain  Point of View Rewrites  Systematic Revising  Juicy Sentences

73 1. Read the sentences. 2. Write one complex sentence, including as much of the original information as possible. 3. Share your sentence with a partner.

74 1. Read the sentence strip. 2. Rewrite the sentence at the bottom of the page by: › Adding a sentence connector. › Adding a complex noun phrase › Changing to conditional tense › Adding a prepositional phrase › Adding an appositive › Adding an adverbial phrase › Changing to past tense › Changing the subject 3. Fold your sentence up and tape it closed!

75 1. Take out your digital oral storyboard. 2. Using your dialogue, think about the horse’s point of view. 3. Brainstorm the horse’s feelings during the sale. 4. Use this information to rewrite the story of the horse’s sale from the horse’s point of view. 5. Increase the complexity of your text by rewriting at least three sentences using the grammatical structures practiced during the Sentence Chain activity.

76  Important to be consistent in your editing/feedback system within your class and through out school  Create of find a list of symbols to use in revising and editing  Focus on content and form separately  Student Example: Bella Sciveri system used at Glen Burnie H.S.

77  Handout  Video Clip

78 The Chincoteague Pony, now a registered breed, descends from the 'wild' horses on Assateague Island, a 37 mile long barrier island off the coast of Maryland and Virginia.

79 1. Read the sentence orally with students. 2. Write what you think the sentence means on a post-it. 3. Deconstruct the sentence. 4. Ask HOT questions. 5. Students answer with text support. 6. Identify morphology. 7. Write what the sentence means to you now on a post it.

80 The Chincoteague Pony is a type of pony. The Chincoteague Pony is a registered breed. The Chincoteague Pony descends from the 'wild' horses on Assateague Island. Assateague Island is a 37 mile long barrier island. Assateague Island is off the coast of Maryland. Assateague Island is off the coast of Virginia.

81 1. Choose a text exemplar. 2. Find a juicy sentence. 3. Break it down. 4. Develop HOT questions. 5. Identify morphological/grammatical structures you can teach.


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