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Book Four. rapport and goodwill There is great camaraderie among the teammates. They have developed a real camaraderie after working together for so.

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Presentation on theme: "Book Four. rapport and goodwill There is great camaraderie among the teammates. They have developed a real camaraderie after working together for so."— Presentation transcript:

1 Book Four

2 rapport and goodwill

3 There is great camaraderie among the teammates. They have developed a real camaraderie after working together for so long. It is about the camaraderie of troops bound for Vietnam who as their leader warns, have one another and nothing but one another when they fall into hell. —Stanley Kauffmann, New Republic, 25 Mar The coach attributed the team’s success to the camaraderie among the players.

4 fragile; easy to break

5 Frangible china teacups that were totally inappropriate for a child's birthday party were placed on the tables. Mom seldom used the frangible, antique dishes in the china cabinet.

6 any long, repetitive, or dull recital

7 He has a litany of grievances against his former employer. The team blamed its losses on a litany of injuries. The dissatisfied customer read a litany of complaints to the company representative.

8 a suspension of activity; an authorized delay

9 The treaty calls for a nuclear testing moratorium. The director of the blood bank called for a moratorium in donations until the surplus could be used up. In 2000, Illinois declared a moratorium on executions after 13 death-row inmates were exonerated. —Evan Thomas et al., Newsweek, 19 Nov The warring factions declared a moratorium on combat during the peace talks.

10 fervent (enthusiastic); fanatical

11 The detective was zealous in her pursuit of the kidnappers. I was zealous in my demands on my sisters for promptness in rehearsals. I was passionate, intolerant of small talk, hungry for knowledge, grabby, bossy, precocious. —Lynn Margulis, Curious Minds, (2004) 2005 The zealous gardener planted so many flowers that a number of them did not have the necessary space in which to grow.

12 To dry out; to remove moisture

13 That historian's recount of the event desiccates what is actually an exciting period in European history. Add a cup of desiccated coconut to the cookie dough batter. Janet desiccates flowers and then uses them to make wreaths.

14 causing mental or physical pain

15 I felt a wrenching pain in my back as I tried to move the large desk by myself. The wrenching photographs of the starving children prompted Mike to send a donation.

16 full; abundant

17 The book is replete with photographs. The country's history is replete with stories of people who became successful by working hard. The anglers were happy to find their stream replete with trout.

18 Tiresome and long; seemingly endless

19 The baby’s cry seemed interminable as we waited for her mother to get home. The last few hours of school before the holiday vacation seemed interminable.

20 suitable for cultivation of land

21 The family is selling several acres of arable land. Death Valley and the Badlands are both characterized by their lack of arable soil.

22 mournful; gloomy

23 There are several comedic actors known for their lugubrious manners. The diner's dim lighting makes eating there a particularly lugubrious experience. The lugubrious funeral scene temporarily interrupted the comic tone of the play.

24 to shorten

25 A truncated version of the 11 o'clock newscast followed the awards show, which ran over its time slot—as it always does. The candidate truncated his campaign because of a family illness.

26 Occurring or seeming to occur everywhere; omnipresent

27 The company's advertisements are ubiquitous. By that time cell phones had become ubiquitous, and people had long ceased to be impressed by the sight of one. Hot dogs are the ideal road trip food— inexpensive, portable, ubiquitous. —Paul Lucas, Saveur, June/July 2008 The camping trip was horrible; the mosquitoes were ubiquitous and hungry.

28 everyday language

29 My uncle writes essays in a very easy-to- read, vernacular style. He spoke in the vernacular of an urban teenager. But ask baseball people about [Michael] Young, and they'll admiringly tell you that he is a “grinder,” vernacular for a player who works his butt off. —Chris Ballard, Sports Illustrated, 8 May 2006

30 composure; calmness

31 She was an Olympic diver who always displays remarkable equanimity on the platform. Those who are doomed to become artists are seldom blessed with equanimity. They are tossed to drunken heights, only to be brought down into a sludge of headachy despair; their arrogance gives way to humiliation at the next curve of the switchback. —Patrick White, Flaws in the Glass, (1981) 1983 Oddly enough, the plaintiff recounted the story of her attack with perfect equanimity.


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