Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1 The Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 26, 2006 Needs for Indicators.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1 The Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 26, 2006 Needs for Indicators."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 The Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 26, 2006 Needs for Indicators

2 2 Indicator Data Needs & Management Needs EPA Frameworks & Updates The Monitoring Network Design of the NWQMC Presentation Outline

3 3 Water indicators are rarely ( if ever) conceived independent of management needs Agency perspectives influence content Its strategic plan Its decision making Perception of Agency needs changes Role in data collection an issue Indicator Data Needs & Management Needs

4 4 The Search for Water indicators The search for data that exists Problems with “found data” Seldom 100% appropriate Seldom able to combine it or compute with it Data is seldom durable Data collected for specific purposes Indicator Data Needs & Management Needs

5 5 EPA Guidance on Data Quality Objectives EPA’s Report on the Environment (ROE) EPA’s “National Surveys” EPA Frameworks & Updates

6 6 Systematic Planning for Environmental Data Collection 1.Define the problem 2.Define the decision 3.Define the information inputs 4.Specify the circumstances Spatial Temporal Target population 5.Synthesize the above into a logical choice among alternatives EPA Guidance on Data Quality Objectives

7 7 Systematic Planning for Environmental Data Collection 6.Specify acceptable limits on decision errors 7.Define a sampling scheme 8.Design the analysis EPA Guidance on Data Quality Objectives

8 8 The ROE 03 was never > a draft The ROE 07 – Public review in 9-06 Discuss in detail the indicators and data that are currently available and their limitations. Identify the information gaps that should be addressed Target Audience: Environmental professionals in government agencies, academia, private industry, and non-governmental organizations. EPA’s Report on the Environment (ROE)

9 9 Based on 23 questions Air Water Land Human Health Ecological condition EPA’s Report on the Environment (ROE)

10 10 EPA’s “National Surveys” Statistically valid characterizations Stratified random samples Heavily dependent on biological endpoints National Coastal Assessment – Second report Wadeable Streams Assessment – Due May 8 th Lakes Assessment -- Being planned Being researched: Great Rivers Assessment Wetlands Assessments

11 11 Data Needs & Management Needs EPA Frameworks & Updates The Monitoring Network Design of the NWQMC Presentation Outline

12 12 The National Water Quality Monitoring Network for U.S. Coastal Waters and Their Tributaries National Science and Technology Council April 5, 2006

13 13 The Oceans Act of 2000 – Created U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy – To focus on: Protection of life and property Stewardship of resources Protection of environment and pollution prevention Enhancement of marine commerce Closer cooperation among government agencies Background

14 14 U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy 31 Chapters with 200+ specific recommendations Draft sent for review by 55 states and territories Chapter 15 Creating a National Monitoring Network

15 : Develop a national monitoring network that coordinates and expands existing efforts, including monitoring of atmospheric deposition. 15-2: Ensure that the national monitoring network includes adequate coverage in both coastal areas and the upland areas that affect them, and … linked to the IOOS. 15-3: Ensure that the monitoring network has clear goals, specific core variables and an apporpriate sampling framework. Chapter 15: Recommendations for “Creating a National Monitoring Network”

16 16 Created a Committee on Ocean Policy – Coordinate the activities of executive departments and agencies – Facilitate coordination and consultation among Federal, State, tribal, local governments, the private sector, foreign governments and international organizations Issued the U.S. Ocean Action Plan (December 17, 2004) The Administration’s Response

17 17 Charge formally accepted by ACWI in February, 2005 Delegated responsibility to NWQMC Progress report to SWAQ in May, 2005 Progress reported to ACWI in September, 2005 Draft report presented to ACWI in January, 2006 Report approved by ACWI in April, 2006 CEQ and NSTC Charge to ACWI 8

18 18 80 Participants in the National Water Quality Network Design 8

19 19 Participant Affiliation Federal Academia State & Tribal 40% 28% 23% 7% Industry 2% Local Participant Affiliation

20 20 Clear objectives linked to management questions A Network linked to IOOS A Network linking monitoring of linked resources – A “Continuum of Observations” Flexibility over time Includes – Data management system that provides accessible data – Metadata – Quality assurance Design Features

21 21 Monitoring design offers: – National and regional contexts for local programs – Continuum of observations and connectivity – A basis for cause-effect observations – Improved ecological forecasting capability It builds on but doesn’t replace existing programs Raises the bar by promoting – Comparable Data – Easy access to data The Design

22 22 Nine Resource compartments A Continuum of Observations Estuaries Nearshore Offshore and EEZ Great Lakes Coastal Beaches Wetlands With Flow and Flux from Rivers Atmosphere Groundwater Structure of the Design

23 23 Fixed station and probabilistic designs Stations identified Parameters and sampling frequencies specified Provisions for – Data comparability – Data management & access Structure of the Design

24 24 Physical: Flow magnitude and direction, physical habitat, sediments Chemical: -Inorganic: Water-quality characteristics, major ions, nutrients, metals and metalloids -Organic: Bulk organics, volatile organic compounds, pesticides, halogenated hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, contaminants with new and emerging concerns Biological: Diversity, toxicity Constituent Categories

25 25 Network Design Summary

26 26 Sites Shown Meet Several Needs Some sites cover each of the 18 estuaries shown here Some sites Cover the IOOS Region Other sites cover estuarine flow and transport Some of the other sites monitor short-term variability in each estuary Monitoring Estuaries 16

27 27 Monitoring Near Shore This shows 13 of the 50 sites that cover each IOOS Region 17

28 28 Great Lakes Nearshore and Offshore Sites Some sites Cover the IOOS Region 18

29 29 Monitoring Large Rivers 19

30 30 Proposed Riverine Stations – Great Lakes 20

31 31 Monitoring Coastal Rivers Monitoring Stations Existing Flow & Load Upgraded Reactivated New 2i

32 32  Estuaries  Nearshore  Offshore and EEZ  Great Lakes  Coastal Beaches  Wetlands With Flow and Flux from  Rivers  Atmosphere  Groundwater A Continuum of Observations 22

33 33 Design proposes to involve the IOOS Regional Associations in managing a part of the proposed monitoring Design has a data management plan that is consistent with the IOOS Data Plan Design relies on IOOS plans for monitoring the Offshore compartment Coordination With IOOS

34 34 National network at specified spatial and temporal density The Network will rely on existing efforts to the extent possible Federal backbone can be augmented with state and local data that are network compliant Additions and enhancements can be accommodated A Network of Networks

35 35 (continued) Conditions and trends identified at national scale State and local agencies continue to be responsible for detailed problem identification and source tracking A Network of Networks

36 36 Finalize design to determine the “whole” Complete the inventory to determine what portion is on-going Example: Streamgages – Need 258 sites at downstream point of HUC-6 basins – 222 streamgages in place METRIC: 86% of total needed are in place Metrics to Track Network Implementation

37 37 Design places major emphasis on storage and access – Built on ACWI’s Water Quality Data Elements for content, metadata – Assumes USGS and EPA data warehouses – Assumes web services will be the data exchange mechanism Network Data Management

38 38 Discuss the details and advantages of the Network with groups that may become partners in its implementation Appoint agency staff to coordinate implementation of pilots Identify and negotiate pilot studies – Further develop selected details of the Design – Conduct a full inventory of ongoing monitoring that might meet Network requirements Develop metrics to track progress in Network implementation Identify resources Next Steps

39 39 WATER What are the trends in extent and condition of fresh surface waters What are the trends in extent and condition of coastal waters? What are the trends in the condition of recreational waters? What are the trends in the contamination/quality / safety of fish and shellfish? What are the trends in extent and condition of groundwater? What are the trends in the extent and condition of wetlands? EPA’s Report on the Environment (ROE)


Download ppt "1 The Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable April 26, 2006 Needs for Indicators."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google