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PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

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Presentation on theme: "PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES"— Presentation transcript:

1 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES
. SCHOOL LEADERSHIP PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES

2 Complete your Training, You Must.

3 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
WHAT IS A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY? A PLC is a collection of collaborative teams whose members work interdependently to achieve common goals have a persistent dissatisfaction with the status quo are committed to the learning of each student are committed to the learning of each adult are action oriented and work to turn visions into reality set and pursue measurable improvement goals develop and monitor strategies to address weaknesses in learning assess their efforts on the basis of results rather than intentions Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

4 P.L.C. Collaborative Culture Continuum Rubric
Stages Pre-Initiation Initiation Developing Sustaining Teachers work in isolation. There is little awareness of what or how colleagues are teaching. Teachers recognize a common curriculum that they are responsible for teaching, but there is little exchange of ideas regarding teaching, learning and assessment strategies. Teachers function as a group that meets periodically to complete certain tasks such as reviewing intended outcomes and coordinating calendars. Teachers work to gather relevant data, set collective goals, develop strategies to reach the goals. They learn from one another and function as a team. Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

5 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity using shared planning to develop units, lessons, and activities NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit divides the labor; saves time because no one has to do it all; increases quantity and quality of ideas Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

6 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity learning from one another by watching each other teach NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit provides concrete examples of effective practices; expands the observer's repertoire of skills, stimulates analytical thinking about teaching Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

7 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity collectively studying student work to identify weaknesses and plan new ways to teach to those weaknesses NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit increases quantity and quality of insights into student performance; focuses efforts on "the bottom line"--student learning; increases professionalism and self-esteem of learning community members Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

8 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity sharing articles and other professional resources for ideas and insights; conducting book studies of books on teaching and learning NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit expands pool of ideas and resources available to members of the learning community Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

9 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity talking with one another about what and how you teach and the results your teaching produces NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit decreases isolation; increases experimentation and analysis of teaching practices; increases confidence of teachers; provides teachers with greater access to a range of teaching styles, models, and philosophies Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

10 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity providing moral support, comradeship, and encouragement NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit enables teachers to stick with new practices through the rough early stages; decreases burnout & stress; increases team members' willingness to try new methods & to share ideas & concerns with others Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

11 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity jointly exploring a problem, including data collection and analysis; conducting action research NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit improves quality of insights and solutions; increases professionalism Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

12 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity attending training together and helping each other implement the content of the training NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit helps learning community members get more out of training; enables them to go to one another with questions or to get clarification about what was presented during training Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

13 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity sharing the responsibility for making and/or collecting materials NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit helps learning community members feel secure in asking for help and advice; enables the giving of assistance and advice without establishing one-up/one-down relationships Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

14 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity participating in continual quality improvement activities NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit creates more efficient use of time; takes advantage of particular talents or interests of learning community members Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

15 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity using collective decision making to reach decisions that produce collective action NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit improves quality of instruction, student performance, and school operations Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

16 NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS
Learning Community Activity providing support for "help-seeking" as well as "help-giving" NEVER SELDOM SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS This occurs in my school . . . 1 2 3 4 5 Direct Benefit makes a strong statement of shared responsibility and commitment to one another's learning Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

17 If your school is not there yet, who is going to step in and make a PLC happen?
I DO

18 Eaker and DuFour’s Four Questions
KEY QUESTIONS FROM WHATEVER IT TAKES Eaker and DuFour’s Four Questions What do we want our students to know and be able to do? How will we know when they have learned? What will we do when they do not learn? What will we do if they already know the material? Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

19 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
“The quality of a school as a learning community can be measured by how effectively it addresses the needs of struggling students.” James Wright (2005) Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

20 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
DuFour's Pyramid End at about minutes – Stop at pyramid on intervention on the screen. Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

21 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

22 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
PYRAMID OF INTERVENTIONS TIER IV: Specially Designed Learning TIER III: SST-Driven Learning TIER II: Needs-Based Learning TIER I: Standards-Based Learning Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

23 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
ACTIVITY Draw a pyramid to scale if S-B practices are not implemented. Draw a pyramid to scale if Tier II interventions are not developed. Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

24 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
INTENSIVE & EXPENSIVE INTENSIVE & LESS EXPENSIVE Best Teachers Assigned to Weakest Students Lunch & Learn with Administrators Before School and After School Tutoring Tutoring During Electives One Academic Postponed Double Dosing Summer Intervention Saturday School Additional Courses Smaller Class Sizes Parapro for Class Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

25 Planning and Organization
GEORGIA STANDARDS FOR SCHOOL PERFORMANCE EIGHT STRANDS OF QUALITY Curriculum Instruction Assessment Planning and Organization Student, Family & Community Support Professional Learning Leadership School Culture Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

26 ns dc National Staff Development Council December 1 SAI SURVEY

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32 THE PYRAMID OF INTERVENTIONS
Case Conference Academic Help Option Staff Tutoring During the Day Assignment of Peer Tutor From Outside Class In-class Strategies; Informal Peer Tutor, Grouping, Extra Direction, Etc. Subject Area Teachers Phone Parents re: Lack of Academic Success with Note to HR Teachers Subject Area Teachers Phone Parents re: Lack of Academic Success with Note to HR Teachers Subject Area Teachers Confer with Students about Ways to Improve Academic Success. Pyramid Base: In the Fall all Homeroom Teachers Phone all Parents and Create an Initial Information Base.

33 T LA Sc S P E C I A L EDUCATION M SLT SS SE BUS FA

34 Professional Learning Standards
By Elements Learning Communities Leadership Resources Context Data Driven Research-Based Evaluation Learning Design Collaboration Process Equity Quality Teaching Family Involvement Content

35 Follow Up for your PLC High Schools Middle Schools Elementary
Chapter 3 and 4 Middle Schools Chapter 5 Elementary Chapters 6 OR 7 Explain that Elementary has two school perspectives about ladders of intervention. They can choose either or both chapters to study with their faculty.

36 Is there a disconnect between the posted beliefs and the daily classroom practices?

37 Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.
Does the staff of your school endorse this statement? As we begin to tie up our presentation about the WHYs and HOWs of Professional Learning Communities, you need to begin to view all of this information in respect to the specifics of your school. What strengths and weaknesses exists there that can help or hinder the development of a true Learning Community. What assumptions are present within the instructional staff of your school that would govern how they might answer a very key question: How does your school respond when students don’t learn? You are the one person here today who can answer this question: Perhaps you need to begin with a more fundamental question: Does the staff at your school endorse the statement on this slide? ALL KIDS CAN LEARN. If not, what can you do about? “ALL KIDS CAN LEARN.” Georgia will lead the nation in improving student achievement.

38 “We believe all kids can learn . . . based on their ability.”
The Charles Darwin School The Pontius Pilate School “We believe all kids can learn based on their ability.” “We believe all kids can learn if they take advantage of their opportunity we give them to learn.” In the 2004 book WHATEVER IT TAKES, How PLCs Respond When Kids Don’t Learn, DuFour, Eaker and others point out that different schools respond in different ways when students experience difficulties. The specific responses (or non-responses) of various school staffs are determined by their beliefs and assumptions about students and learning. Let’s look at the guiding philosophies at these four different schools. At the Charles Darwin School, the staff believes that the ability that students walk in the door with already predetermines the learning that they are going to graduate with or dropout with. At the Pontius Pilate School, the staff does the minimum requirements to educate the students in their classes and then at the end of the year, “washes their hands” of any responsibility. They main role is to get these kids out of school – one way or another. At the Chicago Cub Fan School, the staff dreams of playing in the world series (i.e. making AYP for all sub groups consistently), but they usually lack the commitment or execution to make the dream a reality. They still glow with that warm & fuzzy feeling, but it is always “Wait ‘til next year!” At the Henry Higgins School, the staff, like Professor Higgins of My Fair Lady, believes that they can perform miracles. They never give up and are willing to do Whatever It Takes in regard to time and support to help students reach high standards of achievement. You -- as a principal have to truthfully answer one very important question. Does your staff really believe that all students can succeed? The Chicago Cub Fan School The Henry Higgins School “We believe all kids can learn something, and we will help all students experience academic growth in a warm and nurturing environment.” “We believe all kids can learn and we will work to help all students achieve high standards of learning.”

39 From what you learned from the Pyramid of Intervention, address this question at your table:
If you were called upon to build a system of interventions to assist students with their learning, what is a short-term win you would plan to achieve in the first 3 months and how would you celebrate that win? Allow folks about 10 minutes to discuss and ask participants to share out their findings. Explain the the “Pyramid of Intervention” is about Beliefs and Attitudes.

40 FIVE TALKING STRATEGIES
to promote teacher reflection on their own learning and teaching practices.

41 MAKE SUGGESTIONS. Do this during post-observation conferences and informally, day to day. Suggestions must be purposeful, appropriate, and non-threatening. Principals should listen carefully, share their own experiences, use examples and demonstrations, give teachers choices, contradict outdated or destructive policies, encourage risk taking, offer professional literature, recognize teachers’ strengths, and focus on improving instruction. 2. GIVE FEEDBACK. Effective principals "hold up a mirror," serve as "another set of eyes," and are "critical friends" to teachers. Feedback focuses on observed classroom behavior, is specific, expresses caring and interest, provides praise, is problem solving, responds to concerns about students, and stresses the principal’s availability for follow-up talk.

42 3. MODEL. Demonstrate teaching techniques in classrooms and during conferences. Model positive interactions with students. Teachers viewed these forms of modeling as impressive examples of instructional leadership. 4. USE INQUIRY AND SOLICIT ADVICE AND OPINIONS. Question teachers and solicit their advice about instruction. 5. PRAISE. Focus on specific and concrete teaching behaviors

43 Six Strategies to Promote Professional Learning:
Emphasize the study of teaching and learning. Provide staff development opportunities that address emergent needs. Encourage teacher input, allow discretion in attending, and support innovation. Principals who were identified as effective leaders in the study often participated in staff development sessions. 2. Support collaboration among educators. Networks are essential for successful teaching and learning. Model teamwork, provide time for collaborative work, and advocate sharing and peer observation. Encourage teachers to visit other teachers, even in other schools, to observe classrooms and programs.

44 Develop coaching relationships. Encourage teachers
Develop coaching relationships. Encourage teachers to become peer coaches. Based on two decades of research, Joyce and Showers (1995) concluded training is effective only when it includes peer coaching in the classroom. Encourage teachers to redesign instructional programs and support diverse approaches to teaching and learning. Be flexible on grouping and strategies. Provide resources to support program redesign when possible.

45 5. Apply principles of adult learning, growth, and development to staff development. Create cultures of collaboration, inquiry, lifelong learning, experimentation, and reflection consistent with the principles of adult learning and an understanding of teachers’ life cycles, roles, and motivation. 6. Implement action research to inform instructional decision making. Use action research. Effective principals in the study are working to conduct staff development as a large-scale action research project, although the efforts are not yet extensive. This is consistent with Calhoun’s (1994) thesis that without class and school-based data about learning, teachers cannot determine the effects of what they do in the classroom.

46 TIPS FOR ADMINISTRATORS
De-emphasize competition among teachers. Professional development programs should teach practicing and aspiring principals how to develop professional dialogue and collegiality among educators. The anchors for such programs should be training in group development, theories of teaching and learning for both adults and children, action research methods, change, and reflective practice.

47 Keys to Effective PLCs Collaboration embedded in routine practices
Time for collaboration built in school day and school calendar Teams focus on key questions Products of collaboration are made explicit Team norms guide collaboration Teams pursue specific and measurable performance goals Teams have access to relevant information

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49 REFLECTIVE BENCHMARKING
My School Staff will say that: I have a sense of humor. I am good at keeping the school safe. I like kids and kids respect me. I understand and can explain S-B practices. I am a good decision maker and believe in a democracy of ideas. I am driven to support professional learning for staff. I can explain why Differentiation is a great tool. I am highly visible in classrooms and the community. I can explain the power of Assessment for Learning practices. I am developing rising stars with my APs and my Leadership Team. ACTIVITY

50 REFLECTIVE BENCHMARKING
My School Staff will say that: I initiate and support change well. I am proactive and can see “around the corners.” I am very clear in communicating my expectations. I can think “out of the box” and “in the box.” I can identify problems, symptoms and root causes. I am good at getting people to work together. I am the lead learner in the school. I am their boss but I also am very much their coach. I model effective leadership and communicate “follower-ship.” I am organized, have a good memory and read a lot. ACTIVITY

51 LEADING THE CHARGE IN CHALLENGING TIMES
Making AYP Now with Standards-Based Practices Stocking a New Toolbox for Teachers & Leaders Surviving the Accountability Tsunami with a Balanced Leadership Approach Conquering the Knowing-Doing GAP with Professional Learning Teams Immediate Results with Differentiated Instruction and Assessment for Learning Using the Georgia School Standards to Move from Good to Great (Cover these by lecture or use participants to “install” the WORD WALL for review purposes.)

52 Curriculum, Assessment,
ROLE SELF ASSESSMENT Manager of Events & Crisis Knowledge of Curriculum, Assessment, Instruction Very Involved with Curriculum, Assessment, Instruction ACTIVITY


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