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INTERNATIONAL MEDIATORS COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE (IMCP) PEER-TO-PEER CONSULTATION BUILDING A COMMUNITY MEDIATION PROGRAM 1.14.15.

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Presentation on theme: "INTERNATIONAL MEDIATORS COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE (IMCP) PEER-TO-PEER CONSULTATION BUILDING A COMMUNITY MEDIATION PROGRAM 1.14.15."— Presentation transcript:

1 INTERNATIONAL MEDIATORS COMMUNITY OF PRACTICE (IMCP) PEER-TO-PEER CONSULTATION BUILDING A COMMUNITY MEDIATION PROGRAM 1.14.15

2 Agenda Roundtable Introductions Community Mediation Program Framework Case Study: El Salvador Question and Answer Working Groups Conclusions Networking Julie Walton Communities in Transition Amy Rymer Friends Peace Teams Jayne Nucete Center for International Development and Conflict Management, University of Maryland Building a Community Mediation Program

3 SUSTAINABILITY Building a Community Mediation Program PARTICIPANTS COURSE CONTENT APPRENTICESHIP MONITOR & EVALUATION Mediation Follow-up

4 SUSTAINABILITY Social Media, Events, Press Local, Internatio nal Scheduling, M&E Government, Education, Faith Based, Businesses, Local /I NGO’s Identifying Organizations, Get Referrals, Network

5 PARTICIPANTS

6 COURSE CONTENT Location Mediation Model Instructors Class Content Class Materials Food

7 APPRENTICESHIP All Mediation Training incudes observation and mentored mediation Where? - government, education, youth detention centers, prison, community centers Challenges Private room Transportation Timing Create the Train-the-Trainer program

8 MONITORING & EVALUATION (M&E) M&E Self Learning Design Monitoring & Evaluation (DME) http://dmeforpeace.org/discuss/forums/ thursday-talks http://dmeforpeace.org/learn/training- modules-design-monitoring-and- evaluation-peacebuilding Develop your TOC http://www.theoryofchange.org USAID http://www.usaid.gov/what-we- do/working-crises-and-conflict/technical- publications Theories and Indicators of Change (THINC) - full version, with primers (March 2013) Theories and Indicators of Change (THINC) - full version, with primers (March 2013). Theories and Indicators of Change (THINC) - Briefing Paper (March 2013). Theories and Indicators of Change (THINC) - Briefing Paper (March 2013) Free Courses – Coursera http://dmeforpeace.org/learn/free- online-courses-me-winter Theory of Change Develop indicators Establish Baseline Measure initial outcomes Make required adjustments Periodic survey for measuring future results Don’t reinvent the wheel Inputs Outputs OutcomesImpacts

9 MEDIATION FOLLOW-UP Social Services - Identify what is available: Counseling Anger Management Mentoring Youth programs Follow-up on agreement action items

10 CASE STUDY: EL SALVADOR Case Study: El Salvador

11 QUESTIONS FOR WORKSHOP Section ONE - Sustainability 1. What are the strengths and weaknesses of starting a peer mediation program in a youth detention center (15-22 years old) versus a school versus a community center for youth like the ones linked to Creative Associates? 2. What are ways to generate commitment among participants so that if one director or mentor leaves the center, the program continues? 3. When working with peer mediation programs, what are strategies to get buy-in from guards, administrators, and youth participants? Section TWO - Participants 1. What are strengths and weaknesses of starting a peer mediation program (in which youth mediate for other youth)? 2. What are strengths and weaknesses of starting a mediation program that focuses on training adult mediators who would do all types of mediations that could also include youth (youth-parent, youth-teacher, etc)? 3. What are the strengths and weaknesses of training mediators who are professionals working with youth in schools, youth organizations, and health services organizations versus the general adult population that might include parents and other adults who don’t work with youth professionally?

12 QUESTIONS FOR WORKSHOP Section THREE - Course Content 1. What are considerations for how to adjust training materials to different cultures? 2. Julie mentioned facilitative mediation as the approach they used to train mediators. Why do you think this approach was important or successful in Belize and how is the mediation style chosen before getting started? What is the dominant mediation style currently used in countries around the world (if there I 3. What alternatives might exist in formatting the mediations to accommodate a more informal space? For example, do mediations have to take place in a private room or could an environment of respect be created so that mediation could take place in a quiet corner or room that might still be exposed to other youth in the center? Section FOUR – Apprenticeship 1. How do you allow youth mediators who leave the center to continue practicing and using the skills they learned inside? 2. How do you create an apprenticeship program without needing to involve people from outside the center? Section FIVE – M&E 1. How much time is generally needed for all the preparatory work to establish strong monitoring for the program before it is, or as it is, implemented? Weeks, months? 2. How is success measured – by number of agreements, by changes in behavior after agreement, by recidivism rates? Section SIX-Follow-up programs 1. What follow-up activities, if any, will take place after the mediation has concluded?


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