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Presentation to the Faculty and Staff of the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology June 4, 2009 College of Engineering, Computer Science,

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Presentation on theme: "Presentation to the Faculty and Staff of the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology June 4, 2009 College of Engineering, Computer Science,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation to the Faculty and Staff of the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology June 4, 2009 College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology Instructional Delivery Models Task Force: Progress Report

2  Context: conversion to semesters  Dean called it the “watershed” approach  Use this opportunity to completely re-envision and reinvent our curriculum.  Goal  Develop programs that are years ahead of their time and the envy of our colleagues nationwide.

3  Factors to consider  New Approaches to Teaching and Learning  New Strategies for Student Success and Retention  Expanded Use of Common Cores  Sustainable Courses  Adaptable/Nimble Programs  Design and Project-Based Learning  Writing Across the Curriculum  Combined Ethics/Writing/Economics Course  Current and Future Accreditation

4  Task force charge:  To look at innovative models and techniques for delivering an up-to-date and exciting ECST curriculum to our students (regardless of the conversion issue)  Task force members:  Don Maurizio – College (moderator)  Russ Abbott – Computer Science  Jai Hong – Technology  Crist Khachikian – Civil Engineering  Trinh Pham – Mechanical Engineering  Nancy Warter-Perez – Electrical Engineering

5  The data  What we learned from the data  Strategies for effective pedagogy  Where does the task force go from here?

6  Three first-time freshman cohorts (2001-3)  Thanks to the Student Support Services Staff  Data from Institutional Research  All ECST students who took the following core courses Fall 2004: CE/ME 201, 205, 208 CS 190, 201-3 ME 323MATH 206-9, 215; EE 204, CS 242Physics 211-3  Recorded all grades for that quarter  Tracked ≤ C- students back 2 years thru W09

7  The data may be open to a number of interpretations. This presentation will focus primarily on the data without attempting to draw conclusions from it. Focus on “what” and “how many” and not on the “why” 7

8  What is the distribution between first-time incoming freshman and transfers in ECST?  Of these students, what % persist through the 1 st year? 8

9 9 ECST n = 450 FreshmenTransfers ECST n = 193 ECST n = 123 1 st -time freshmantransfer Mid-Year dropouts End in good standing End in difficulty Distribution of freshman and transfer students 1 st year persistence

10  On average, how long does it take an incoming freshman to graduate from our programs? 10

11 Information about students who took 7 years or more to graduate was not available

12  On average, how many students repeat a course from the list below at least once? twice? three times?... 12 CE/ME 201, 205, 208 CS 190, 201-3, 242 ME 323MATH 206-9, 215 EE 204Physics 211-3

13 Repeat Cycle # of students % of previous repeating % of original cohort repeating Average # of grades/student 1 st time taking1708003.4 ± 2.3 * Repeat 187951% 1.7 ± 1.0 Repeat 239945%23%1.3 ± 0.6 Repeat 315639%9%1.1 ± 0.3 Repeat 46441%4%1.09 ± 0.3 Repeat 52234%1%1.05 ± 0.2 13. Excluding all W, WU, I, IC, and U data, the following table tries to represent the data to answer this question: * represents standard deviation value. *represents standard deviation - Excluding all W, WU, I, IC, and U data

14  What are student GPAs for when taking the courses:  For the 1 st time?  Repeated for the 1 st time?  Repeated for the 2 nd time?  … 14 CE/ME 201, 205, 208 CS 190, 201-3 ME 323MATH 206-9, 215; EE 204, CS 242Physics 211-3

15 15 5644

16  Conducted a student survey in a number of courses to address the following prompts:  Which courses were difficult? Why?  Which courses were enjoyable? Why?  Level of exposure to research/design  et cetera… Courses about which students were surveyed: CE/ME 201, 205, 208, 303 EE 204, 244, 304, 332, 334, 336 CS 201-3, 242, 312,Math 206-9, 215 Phys 211-3 16

17 17 Student profile Student employment

18  Which courses were ranked as the most difficult? Courses included in survey: CE/ME 201, 205, 208, 303 EE 204, 244, 304, 332, 334, 336 CS 201-3, 242, 312Math 206-9, 215 Phys 211-3 18

19 19 (a)Easy to hard: CS 201, 202, 203, 312 Math 206, 209, 207, 208 (b) Hard to easy:CE/ME 201, 205, 208, 303 (a)Easy to hard: CS 201, 202, 203, 312 Math 206, 209, 207, 208 (b) Hard to easy:CE/ME 201, 205, 208, 303

20  What did students say about why those courses were difficult? 20

21 21 Student not responsible Student responsible

22  Students also identified courses they particularly liked or learned the most from  What reasons did they give for these selections? 22

23 23

24 24

25  Many students repeat many courses  For those who repeat the average repeat rate was 3; a few repeated 9-11 times (with Ws and other “non- grades”)  Repeating courses does not improve performance  Graduation Rate: ~20% in 6 years  Courses were ranked as difficult because 1) material was difficult; 2) material was confusing; and 3) material wasn’t presented well  Students enjoy classes because 1) the topic interests them; and 2) they like the teaching style 25

26  Learning Styles (Modalities)  Auditory – Learn by hearing Efficacy*  Visual – Learn by seeing  Kinesthetic/Tactile – Learn by doing Tell me and I forget. Show me and I remember. Involve me and I understand. (John Gay) * Varies by individual 26

27  Active and Cooperative Learning  Active Learning – Learning by doing  Coop. Learning – Learning by working in teams  Project Based/Contextual Learning  Students are given a problem to solve  The problem contains the essential elements of the subject (at that point in the program)  The solution is tangible and open-ended 27

28  In-class active learning/reflection  In class reflection (e.g., minute paper, muddiest point, etc.)  In class assessment  New pedagogical technologies (e.g., clickers)  Broader modifications  Connecting labs and recitations to lecture courses  Group/team projects  Integrate MEP model into programs 28

29  Integrated Thematic approach – from freshman year to graduation  Integrated and contextualized math and science blocks  Writing/communication, ethics, and professionalism across the curriculum  Design across the curriculum  Project- and team-based learning 29

30  Multiple “challenges” running simultaneously  Freshman introduced to challenge  Courses oriented toward the challenge  Common core courses  Specialized higher-level  Senior/MS projects make an advance with respect to the challenge. 30

31  Students (at all levels) enter enterprise as interns  Just-in-time learning: academic material is learned in small increments as needed for the current task  Students advance in the enterprise as they progress through their college/graduate career  Senior/MS projects make a significant contribution to the enterprise’s product 31

32  Courses oriented towards the technology.  Technology must be broad enough to support this.  Senior/MS projects develop a significant product or result that uses or contributes to the technology.  Can be conceptualized as an alternative view of the “grand challenge” approach 32

33  Preliminary report to the Dean in a few weeks  Continue to develop and refine model 33


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